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CHRONICLES OF ERI; 

BEING THE 

HISTORY OF THE GAAL SCIOT IBER: 

OR, 

THE IRISH PEOPLE; 

TRANSLATED FROM THE ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPTS IN THE 
PHOENICIAN DIALECT OF THE SCYTHIAN LANGUAGE. 



BY O'CONNOR. 





VOL. II. 



LONDON. 

PRINTED FOR SIR RICHARD PHILLIPS AND CO. 

1822. 




I/, 2 



Cf)e Chronicles of 



PART THE SECOND. 



CHAP. L 

Here commence the annals of Eri. This chapter gives 
an account of the arrival of the colony from Spain 
in Eri their conquest of three quarters of the is- 
land their covenant with the Danan, the former 
rulers their division of their own portion into 
three separate kingdoms the contention of Iber 
and Erimionn the fall of Iber; and the death of 
Erimionn. The whole embracing the space from 
1006 to } 004 years before Christ, being two years. 

JjAAL was favourable until the host came within 
sight of the land of their vengeance. Then did he 
send forth his messengers of air ; and they brake 
the vessels, and scattered them on every side : twelve 
ships did the servants of the anger of Baal bury 
beneath the waves of the vast deep. 

On that day was Colba overborne at the mouth 
of a river of the land, (a) 

On that day perished Cier within the jaws of an 
inlet of the sea at the extremity of the world or 
land. 

Howbeit the remainder of the host with difficulty 
reached the shore with Marcad, lolar, and Blat % 

VOL. II. B 



2 CHRONICLES 

sons of the hero, and Lugad the son of Ith, and 
the children of Marcad and lolar, and Er son of 
Cier, he would abide with the sons of Marcad, his 
companions in Gaelag. 

And Marcad bad, " Let three men abide with 
each ship, and let all the women tarry with them, 
whiles their brethren go to take vengeance for Ith's 
blood, and win the land ; and the cloth was spread 
to take the lots of those to stay behind. 

When all the men, and all the women cried aloud, 
" Let none be left, let all die together, or all have 
glory of those who shed Itfis blood !" They would 
not be intreated. 

And the Gaol were gathered together, and the 
men of the land assembled, more in number than 
the Gaol, one score for one. 

And the battle endured not long, when bands of 
the servants passed over unto us, and the masters 
fled. 

And on the next day the battle was renewed, and 
the men of the land were overthrown : the clubs 
availed not, the servants stung the masters sorely. 

And on the third day, the chiefs of the land did 
send messengers unto Marcad; and the messengers 
had their clubs behind them, and both their arms 
on their breasts, token of peace. 

Now it happed that men of the Gaal, in a ship of 
Feneid, on their way from Breotan to Gaelag, driven 
from its course, was broken here eight rings gone 
by; these did know the speech of the Danan. 

These did the Danan bring before Marcad; and 
when their joy had abated in some sort, for seeing 
the face of their brethren, they did speak in the 



OF ERI. 3 

speech now of one, now of another ; and after this 
manner was the covenant made sure between the 
chiefs of Iber, and the chiefs of the land aforetime. 

And the chiefs of the land said, " Ye be mightier 
than we through the falsehood ofCloden, the Danan 
will not be in subjection nor yet under tribute to 
thee. We will move to the far side of the old river, 
and dwell between the waters thereof, and the waves 
of the vast sea. We will not pass over to this side 
of the river to thy people, nor must thy people pass 
over to us. Moreover Cloden is in thy hand ; do 
unto them as seemeth good to thee ; if ye deal kindly 
by them, and put thy trust in them, look to it. 

On that day, the second day after Baal had en- 
tered into the second chamber of his house Sgith, 
was the covenant made. 

And the Danan did set up a large stone on the 
spot, where the covenant was made ; and I Ordac 
have set down words on the chronicles of the Gaal, 
to remain for ever. (#) 

And Marcad said, " Let this place be called 
MAG-MOR-TIOMNA," and all said, " Yea."(c) 

Now peace abideth. The Danan are in motion 
towards the country of the covenant. Firgneat flock 
aroupd the Gaal. 

The tents of Marcad are raised up on Magmor- 
tiomna; and the tents of Iber stand about the tents 
of the chief; for Marcad saith, " 'Twere well that 
the Gaal rest together, till the Danan pass the 
waters." 

Firgneat are helping unto us in all things ; arid 
the Gaal cast on this land in the days of Golam are 
with their brethren. 

B 2 



4 CHRONICLES 

And they do tell of Cloden ; they are Firgneat, 
Cegail, born of the elements of this land. 

And the Uanan did hither come from beneath the 
fingers of Baal, ten score and eleven knots now 
passed ; and they did overbear Firgneat, and hold 
them in bondage with rigour. 

Neither did ever hear of Baal.(d) 

Now what time we had sojourned three moons on 
Magmortiomna, Marcad called to him all the chil- 
dren of Iber; and the chiefs did hold talk in the pre- 
sence of the Gaol ; and he did rise in the midst, and 
said, 

" The land is now free for the foot of the children 
of Iber. What, if it were explored, none knoweth 
the limits thereof? After what manner shall we go 
forth ? The Danan may prove false. Shall we 
separate, or shall we move together ? Thin is our 
host by the power of Baal. 

" Sru was but his messenger, as drought and pesti- 
lence; Golam the renowned, though mighty, could 
not stand against the mightier Baal; therefore is 
our host thin. 

" Colba is beneath the waters of the deep unburied. 

" Cier can no more hear the sound of Marcad's 
voice. Oh, that he could ! Cier lieth under his 
heap ; his death-song chaunted ; his war-song raised. 
Who, but Baal, could overthrew Cier the mag- 
nanimous? What availeth man against the Al- 
mighty?" And Marcad wept; and all the host 
lifted up their voice, and cried. After awhile, Marcad 
said, " If Blat would speak." 

And Blat said, " What, if all move together?" 

And Marcad said, "What saieth lolarT 

And lolar said, " What, if three parts be made of 



OF ERT. 5 

the Gaol, and that one part move nigh unto their 
brethren, keeping a course all to the same point?" 

The words of lolar being good, preparations were 
made; and what time Baal entered the threshold of 
his house Tirim, the congregation were in motion. 

And Mar cad went out before the host, with one- 
third towards the south ; and Blat moved on the 
right of Mar cad; and lolar took his course on the 
right of Slat. 

And the Olam and the priests, the bards, and 
the minstrels, were divided amongst the chiefs ; and 
the women and children were with their Clann ; 
and Firgneat were with us, conducting the Gaol 
through the passages of the land. 

And Er the son of Cier was in the hand of 
Mar cad ; yea, before the sons of Marcad, as he 
went, the step of the warrior shortened e'en to the 
paceing of the lad. 

And we journeyed, Marcad having the waters of 
the great sea on his left close by, until we met water 
of rivers unfordable ; then artificers of the Gaol con- 
structed boats, for Marcad caused all the vessels to 
be burned on which the host were conveyed from 
Gaelag to this land. 

And thus did we proceed, till we saw from the sum- 
mit of mountains, the extremity of the world of land. 

Then we changed our course descending into the 
planes beneath, till we reached the streams of the 
waters, wherein perished Cier the magnanimous; and 
Marcad would go, to look upon the heap, beneath 
which Lieth the brother of his soul, that was, O 
grief! and go he did, taking with him a few in his 
company. 



6 CHRONICLE* 

And as we entered into that land, did we not see 
of Gaal of Iber, abiding thereon ? we did hear them 
speak in the tongue of the Gaal in great part : and 
they did tell of strange things confusedly; but they 
know not of Gaelag, nor Dunmianac, nor much of 
aught : these did minister unto us, to the fulness of 
their little means. 

And we did stand upon the extremity of the 
world of land, save the small portion separated there- 
from, whereon is raised the heap of Cier, in the 
midst of the waters of the roaring sea. on which the 
raging winds did not suffer Marcad now to pass. 

Therefore did we raise our eyes toward, our hands 
outstretched, tears flowing from the eyes of the boy 
Er; yea, and of all ; and Marcad said, with falter- 
ing voice, 

" May the spirit of Cier, the son of the hero, be 
immortal !" and he added, moreover, " Let this 
river be called the river of lifer, for the times to 
come, in memory of this son of Iber, the glory of the 
race."(V) 

And we returned to our brethren, and they would 
go also to see the heap of Cier, but Marcad stayed 
them. 

And the host moved forward till we reached the 
waters of Seanamhan, beyond which are the lands of 
the Danan; and we kept the river on the left of us, 
nor departed Marcad therefrom, till we reached the 
fountain thereof. 

Then we moved towards the sun's going, till we 
touched upon the world of waters, and we did hear 
of a truth, " the waves of the vast sea do wash the 
margin of the land, through all the course from the 



OF ERI. 7 

going forth of the waters of Seanamhan, to the very 
spot whereon ye stand." 

Then we moved northward ; the ocean on our left 
very near, till our foot was stayed by ocean's self. 

Then changing our course towards the sun's ris- 
ing, the waters of open sea or of salt lakes on our 
left, we advanced till our step was arrested at the 
extreme of land again; then we did tumour faces 
towards the strength of Baal. 

And, as Baal was entering the threshold of the 
mansion of his blessed fire, the whole host did move 
into Magmortiomna, for Mar cad loitered, that we 
may return to the spot, whence we did take our de- 
parture, at that set time. 

And now it was manifest, that the land was en- 
compassed with the waters of the mighty sea on 
every side an island. 

For nine days after, the Gaol abided in repose: 
then Marcad assembled the congregation, and he 
stood up in the midst, and said, 

" When our fathers came from Iber unto a strange 
land, did they not give names to their dwellings, the 
hills and planes, the waters of the rivers ; yea, the 
waves of the sea itself; to preserve the memory of 
their former place, that the name of Er should ne'er 
be lost, whilst time shall endure. 

" What, if this land, standing alone, an island, be 
called ERI for the times to come?(X) 

" TheGaalofSciot of Iber, Nomades, Oigeageis, we 
are, and ever shall be, go where we will, fare as we may. 

" For myself, I would, that those of my loins were 
called the race of Iber, so long as they endure. 

" Words have passed to my ear, * This land is 



8 CHRONICLES 

large, too large for one chief; the chiefs did choose 
Marcad in the place of his father to rule in Gaelag 
Gaelag is not Eri. These words are true. 

" What, then, if the chiefs speak their free thoughts, 
concerning these things ; if any have taken thought 
to utterance if not. What, if we forbear for other 
nine days, and in time that passeth between think, 
and then hold talk." 

And it was so. 

In the meanwhile the priests came together, and 
they did choose Blat, the son of the hero, Ard Cruim- 
tear, in the place of Fionar, who remained behind 
in Gaelag, oppressed with sickness and with age. 

And when the time was come for the assembly to 
be together, Iber rose, and said, 

" This land is large as it is said, six moons were 
the Gaol encompassing their portion thereof What 
eye can see, what voice can be heard, what arm 
reach so far ? There remain three of the race of 
hero. Let the chiefs speak." 

Now Blat Ard Cruimtear was on the mount. 
Mild and gentle as the evening's breeze from the 
summer's sun, was Iber; he said not aught all the 
chiefs held their peace therefore. 

And Blat opened his mouth, and said, 

" There remain three of the race what if the 
land be divided between Iber and lolar ? Let my 
glory be, that I am of the race, and belong to Baal 



moreover." 



When Blat uttered these words, the chiefs on the 
mount stamped with their feet, and the Gaol round 
about the assembly raised an outcry, all repeating 
the name of Cier. 






OF ERI. 9 

After awhile, Aongus, a chief of the Gaal, said, 

" Is Cier so soon forgotten ? Cier is beneath his 
heap not so his spirit ;" and passing to Iber, by 
whose side stood the boy Er. Aongus added, 

" What, though Blat, now Ard Cruimtear, there- 
fore not here in place, should think the day was for- 
gotten whereon Marcad was chosen chief in Gaelag ; 
the words of Cier on that day, saying, ' Let Marcad 
take the seat of his father/ still resound in the ear 
of Aongus. Do not they resound at this moment in 
the ear of Iber, yea, and of all who first heard 
them ? Were not these the words of Cier, the minds 

of the chiefs cleaving unto Cier the while? Ah! 

the bulk of Cier is beneath his heap ;" and taking 
the boy Er by the hand, he said, " The spirit of 
Cier abideth with his son. Shall the land be di- 
vided, and the child of Cier want the portion of his 
Sire ? Will the chiefs allow this- thing ?" 

The relation of Aongus being ended, the Gaal 
shouted, and invoked the spirit of Cier to look down 
upon his child. 

Whereupon Blat said, " The words came from my 
lips, for that Er is not of the age." 

And Aongus said, " When Enar, the father of 
Eolus, the wisest of men, was left alone of all the 
race. Did not nine of the heads of the people of 
Gaelag rule the land, yea, for one score rings, and 
four ? Can not the portion of Er, in Eri, be so ruled 
for the thirteen rings that the youth lacketh ?" 

And the Gaal called aloud on Iber and the chiefs 
to protect the orphan boy. Now silence was. Iber 
rose up, and said, 
. " What, if the land that remained) to the children 



10 CHRONICLES 

of Iber be divided into three parts, and the lots 
cast; and as they point, let Er the son of Cier y 
lolar, and Iber, take." 

And all cried, " Let Iber choose his portion." 

But Iber answered, " Nay, let the cloth be spread ; 
the words of Eolus the wise and good are ever pre- 
sent to my senses ;" and Iber would take but as the 
lot. 

And the land was set out in three parts, and Iber 
had the south ; beyond him, still more southward, is 
Lugad the son of Ith to raise his tents, bordering 
on the waters of the great sea. 

And the southern limit of the land of lolar is the 
northern bound of Iber. 

And the portion of Er extendeth from the northern 
marks of lolar, to the extremity of the land. Hovv- 
beit, the Firgneat have their dwellings on the far 
side of the waters of the land, that spread and move 
between the country of the Danan, and the land of 
Er; and nine of the heads of the Gaol rule the por- 
tion of the youth, till he shall come to the age.(-) 

And Blat is high-priest. 

And portions are devising for the chiefs ; and the 
Olam, the priests, the bards, the minstrels, and all 
of the Gaal. Thus doth time pass, and in providing 
sustenance for the life of man ; therefore the Olam 
hath yet no hearer. 

And when one ring was complete, strife fell out 
between Iber and lolar. Iber lamenteth to me, 
Ordac, saying, " The love of lolar to me ward 
lacketh. Blath to my seeming is the cause thereof/' 
Now, for the first time, did the Gaal draw the sword 
one against the other, and shed brother's blood. 



OF ERI, 11 

Was not Iber slain bv the hand of lolar ! ? O, 
shame ! 

And the heap of Iber is raised in the centre of the 
land, on the spot where he fell, the bed of his ever- 
lasting sleep ; his death-song chaunted ; his war- 
song poured forth ; and the children of the land in- 
voked the spirit of Iber, the strength of Golam now 
fallen in his prime, alas ! 

The stone being set, Lugad said aloud, " Let this 
heap be called Ceseol for ever."(*) 

And the land mourneth, for that Iber is no more : 
mild, and true, and just, was Iber. 

I, Ordac, did not return to Deas. I journeyed to 
Er, the son of Cier ; the writings of JEolus, and the 
chronicles of the Gaal along, which Marcad had put 
into my hands ere we did depart from Gaeleg. The 
king kept the writings since the days of Ardfear. 
Marcad saying to me, 

" Nourish the fire of the spirit, and fill the mind 
of the youth with the food prepared for the chil- 
dren of Iber, by JEolus the Wise, and by the Olam, 
in the words of the Chronicles of the Gaal of Sciot 
of Iber ; and Ordac will do his endeavour to the ut- 
most to make Er enamoured of justice and truth, 
and mercy, that he may be perfect. 

^ 7 OTES TO CHAPTER I. 

(a) At this day the haven of the river Boyne is called Imbar Colba, 
from this prince. 

(6) In this modest tale is to be found, the authentic history of the 
emigration of this colony of Iberian Scythians, or as they call them- 
selves, Gaal Sciot Ibcir, Nomades, Oigeageis, from Galicia, in Spain, 
to Eri, in which they make no boast of their own prowess ; but at- 
tribute their success to the want of destructive arms by the Danan, 



12 CHRONICLES 

and to the co-operation of the Firgneat, or native aborigines, on 
which you may remember Ith placed his chief expectation of winning 
the land. In this narrative is to be found a wholesome lesson to all 
those who have acquired power over their fellows : it would teach 
them to raise their hope of stability, and true glory, on the sure 
foundation of the affections of the people they govern, and would 
instruct them that contempt and continuance of insult, have proved 
the cause of their destruction as frequently as acts of open violence. 
; (c) This place is still called by the same name. 

(d) From these chronicles we learn the following important truths: 
That the aborigines were called by their first invaders, Cloden, a 
term of disrespect of the Danan language, which aborigines were 
by the Iberians called "Firgneat, native," and " Cegail, exhalations 
from the earth." That the Danan were the first people who invaded 
the aborigines, more than two centuries antecedently to the coming 
of the Iberians, and were from the north, from Co-Dania, as I think, 
but must not assert. 

That all the tales of Bartolanus, Numidius, the Fomorians, or 
African Pirates, with all their train, are merely flights of the fancy 
of the bards, and that there is no foundation whatever, for any of the 
conjectures of modern systemizers, concerning the arrival in this 
island of a tribe of the Cimmerian Belgae ; a supposition arising from 
the similarity of the word Fearbolg, " a sack-carrier," a name applied 
to "the Firgneat" from their abject condition to the Danan, and Viri 
Belgici, of the Latini^K The refutation of all their systems being to 
be found in the true character of the Belga, and in the miserable 
state of the Firbolg, in Eri, a state to which the brave Bdgce. could 
not have been reduced. The Danan are the Damnonii of the 
Latinists, who now by covenant yielded three parts of the island to 
the Iberians, and retired to the far side of Seanaman, where they ex- 
ercised their own laws, and were an independent people for 1000 
years afterwards. 

(e] The scene of this action was the extremity of the land, -on the 
northern bank of the river now called Kenmare, on an island a little 
way removed from the main land, called Fearmor, " the great man," 
was the heap of Cier raised, and from him was the river, now Ken- 
marc, called Iber, for many generations. 

(/) Here we have the true signification of the word " Er-i" the 
island of Er'. What a world of pains would a little knowledge have 
saved would-be Etymologists ! 



OF ERI. > 13 

(g) At this time the part of Eri, acquired by this colony, was 
divided into three separate independent kingdoms. 

(h) " Ceseol" means the bed of the land, it is supposed to be the 
centre of Eri, and is now called Geshill. 

For all the proper names you will consult the Glossary, which will 
explain the true significations, and point out modern corruptions. 



CHAP. II. 

The reign of lolar, Erimionn, a space of thirteen 
rings, from 1004 to 991 years before Christ. 

IBER fell, and lieth on Ceseol; and Er is in 
youth, and not one of the sons of Iber is of the age. 
Wherefore lolar taketh upon him to rule in Deas, 
yea, and to say unto the chiefs who sit in the place 
of Er, " Do this, refrain from that," as though he 
had authority. Moreover doth he not call himself 
Erimionn ? (a) 

And Lugad the son of ///* communed with lo- 
lar ; and he said unto him, " What if nine chiefs 
ruled in Deas, till the first-born of Iber shall come 
to the age, as in the portion of Er ?' 9 

And lolar answered, " Abide thou within thy 
portion, Lugad. What hast thou to do with the 
children of Iber r 

And words of the chiefs of Deas came to the ear 
of lolar, saying, "Doth lolar think to rule the por- 
tion of Iber ? It shall not be." 

And lolar said unto Blat, " Go thou and sit in 
Deas, and after a while thou and 1 will speak far- 
ther." And Blat went his way. 

Now lolar disclosed of his thoughts to Aongus, 



14 CHRONICLES 

enough to allow the chief to judge of what he did 
keep back, and Aongus repeated in the ears of his 
fellows the words of lolar, and they were of one 
mind to maintain for Er his portion.^) 

All eyes regard Er with a look of love and 
tenderness, as well those who remembered Daire 
his father, as he fought like the wolf to save the 
Gaalfrom captivity, and led those who stood about 
him, and in triumph bore off the forms of his 

father, and his brethren, fallen in the battle as 

those brought up with him in Eri. 

Er taketh delight in the lessons of wisdom, he 
chargeth the Olam to nourish the fire of the spirit of 
the youth, that he and his race may rule over men. 

Now it came to pass that JBlat y sitting in the 
place of Iber in Deas, Erac the first-born of Iber, 
came to the age, and the chiefs, and the Gael of 
that land said, " None but Erac shall rule over 
us." 

Now there was a covenant between lolar and 

~Blat, and Blat was to sit in Deas under lolar, and 

Blat answered to the chiefs, and said, " Am not I of 

the race of Er also?" and he calleth himself Amcr- 

gein. (c) 

Now Amergein had not taken a damsel, and 
lolar had hope (were not his thoughts made mani- 
fest unto Aongus?) of over-ruling Eri. Still did the 
chiefs say, " Amergein may not rule and be Ard 

Cruimtear." Then did Amergein say, " I rule but 

till Erac hath wisdom." 

And after a while Amergein took unto him Cora, 
the ndster of Lugad; then did lolar say, " Erac, 



OF ERJ. 15 



the son of Iber, my brother, is of the age," ana 
ergein answered, " Amergein sitteth in his own 
place." 

And lolar stirred up the children of Iber against 
Amergein ; and he sent a messenger unto the chiefs 
of the land who ruled in the place of Er, saying, 
" Will ye suffer that Amergein keep Erac the son 
of Ibsr, the nursing father of Er, from his seat?" And 
they answered, " We will abide." 

At this time, Er the son of Cier being of the age, 
was chosen by the chiefs to rule. 

Thus it was, when the priests of Gaelen assembled 
to make regulations concerning the congregations 
of the children of the land ; and when they were 
together, Amergein on the seat of the high-priest, 
Tirac and a company surrounded the hill, and they 
came upon Amergein, and they slew him, and went 
their way. 

And when the priests found that life was quite 
gone, they laid the weight of Amergein on the earth, 
and thereon did they pile stones till a little heap 
was raised ; and the heap is called Breag, because 
of the falsehood of lolar. (d) 

Nevertheless, the priests chose Erial, the son of 
lolar, to be high-priest. 

Now, three of the sons of Iber were of the age, 
and the chiefs of Deas assembled ; and words were 
spoken, " Erac is the servant of lolar." 

And Dorlat stood up, and said, " Is Erac the 
servant of lolar?" 

And Erac stood up, and he did say aloud, "Erac 
never was, nor will he ever be the servant of lolar, 
or of any man, Erac is the son of Iber, son of the 



16 CHRONICLES 

hero ;" and Erac was placed on the seat of his 
father. 

Now, this was grief to the spirit of lolar, for he 
devised other things ; and he pined more and more 
every day till he ceased ; the days of his rule from 
the fall of Iber being marked full thirteen rings.(e) 

And Erial called together the priests of Gaelen, 
and many of the Gaal ; and a heap was raised over 
lolar, and his death-song was chaunted ; the war- 
song was not heard. 

What tongue so false as to speak in the praise ol 
lolar in the battle ? 

NOTES TO CHAPTER II. 

(a) This title of Erimionn, now usurped by Mar, was always a 
source of discord and confusion amongst the ruling chiefs of the 
three kingdoms of Eri. From ii, this son of Golam and his race are. 
known by the name of Erimionn, corrupted into H'erimon. 

(b} You perceive the design of lolar was to supplant all the chil- 
dren of his two brothers ; Iber whom he alew on Ceseol, and Cicr? 
who was drowned ; in which project Amergein pretended to aid/ 
thinking himself secure of his co-operation, he sounded Aongus, a, 
chief of the portion of Er, one of the nine tutors of the youth. 

(c) Amergein signifies " of the race of Er also." 

(d) It is common at this day for every person who passes by any 
place, where one has been killed by evil mind, or accident in the 
open air, to throw a stone on the place, the heap of which is called 
Cam. "Breag" means "false." 

(e) When lolar found he was foiled in all his malpractices, he 
took the disappointment to heart, and died. 



OF ERI. 17 

CHAP. III. 

The covenant of the sons of lolar, a space of three 
rings. Before Christ 991. 

Now the sons of lolar did not call together the 
chiefs of Gaelen, they did say amongst themselves, 
" Erial, sit thou still on the seat of the high-priest;" 
arid Erial sayd, " Mumne, Luigne, and Laisne, my 
brethren, rule each one ring." (a) 

And it was so : and Mumne calleth himself Eri- 
mionn. And Erac, and all the sons of Iber, sent a 
messenger with letters unto Er, saying, 

" Will Er yield to the sons of lolar ? hath fear 
taken possession of his mind, that they will slay 
him, as their father slew Iber our father then mourn- 
ed for him ? If Er would speak." 

When the messenger came, Ordac was on the 
bed of sickness ; and Er did call unto him Aongus 
and Aod, chiefs of the land, and Togher of the Olam, 
and he did set the words before them, saying, " Er 
would answer, Er will abide in his own land." 

And the words were good, and they were sent by 
the hand of the messenger of Erac. 

And Ordac died ; and Togher was chosen Ard 
Olam within the portion of Er, whither all the Olam 
have come, and Er doth cherish the teachers of 
wisdom, (b) 

The tents of the chiefs are raised up on their Ta- 
naisteas, the Olam are in the booths, the bards and 
the minstrels are distributed amongst the chiefs. 
The Gaal and the heads of the people yet move 
through the land. 

VOL. ii. c 



18 CHRONICLES 

Neither the mounts of the congregations, nor the 
dwellings of the priests, are established, till the land 
shall be explored, (c) 

The Danan observe the covenant, the love of 
Firgneat is to us ward. Now Mumne had ruled in 
Gaelen for one ring, and Luigne hath taken the seat 
of the chief, calling himself Erimionn. (cT) 

And after one ring hath Laisne done in like sort. 
And in eleven moons Mumne died. 

And Laisne sent a messenger unto Erac, chief in 
J>eaVaying, " At what time will Erac send to have 
the marks set up, that Laisne may send also?"(e) 

And Erac bad the messenger to say, " The marks 
are set." And Laisne assembled chiefs and of the 
Gaol to fix the limits ; and they moved with staffs 
and dogs, as a hunting. 

And the men of Deas did speed to the borders to 
meet them ; and they were armed for the battle. 

But when it was told to Erac, " Laisne goeth as 
the hunter, bearing the staff," Erac said, " It is well ; 
a son of Iber will not raise the sword against the 
club." 

And the men of Deas did cut down poles ; and 
they hung up their swords on the branches of the 
trees, noting the place. 

And when the men of Gaelen shewed themselves, 
the men of Deas hastened towards them ; and Erac 
stepped out before the Gaal 9 and Laisne did speed 
to meet him, each the pole of the hunter in his hand. 
And Erac said unto Laisne, " Halh Laisne had sport 
so far from his dwelling? Moveth he with his com- 
pany to the tents of Iber?" 

And Laisne said, " Erimionn hath hither come 



OF ERI. 19 

to stop the foot of Iber from straying beyond the 

limits of his land." Scarcely had the last of the 

words been uttered, when Erac, raising his staff on 
high, smote Laisne on the summit of the head ; and 
ere Luigne and the Gaol of Gaelen had come nigh 
unto them, Erac repeated the blows so oft, that 
Laisne lay motionless on the earth. (/) 

Now Luigne speeded to the spot, the Goal of 
Gaelen at his back ; and thither also ran Eran, the 
brother of Erac, the men of Deas at his very heels : 
and they strove on the body of Laisne, till any of 
life that may have remained from the blows of Erac 
vanished. 

And after a while, Luigne fell also. 

And when the men of Gaelen saw Luigne fall, 
they gave way ; and the men of Deas cryed aloud, 
" Why in such haste, men of Gaelen ? Have ye for- 
gotten that ye came with your ERIMIONNS to fix 
the limits of the land ?" 

Now the host was gathered together, and the 
forms of Laisne and of Luigne were placed nigh 
unto each other, and the circle was made, and Erac 
stood in the midst, and he said 

" When Iber, my father, went to Ceseol, thither 
called by lolar, lolar slew my father with treachery, 
then lamented him, calling him the strength of Go- 
lam, fallen in his prime! Spirit of Iber! look out 
in smiles upon thy sons ; have they not taken ven- 
geance for thy blood ! Let the shades of the children 
ef the spoiler of a brothers life stray where they 
may ; the finger of man shall never point to the heap 
of these sons of Mar "(g) 

c2 



20 CHRONICLES 

And Erac bad, " Let the bodies of these twain 
be flung into the waters." And it was so. 

And Erac added moreover, " When the Gaal take 
down their swords from the branches whereon they 
hang, let them carry with them the clubs also where- 
with they humbled the pride of the ERIMIONNS, 
and made the men of Gaelen skip before them, and 
shew them to their children. And for the times to 
come, let this place be called Urlann."(K) 

And Erac returned to his place. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER III. 

(a) From hence it appears, they began to decline from the insti- 
tutions of their forefathers, who never presumed upon doing any act 
of government, without consulting and getting the sanction of the 
assembly. ' 

(b) Though the Oiam were generally established through Gaelag 
it appears that they were confined to the portion of Er, in Eri, for 
a long series of years ; from which circumstance, as you will ob- 
serve, that kingdom was far superior to the other two. 

(c) Here we have the progress of the colony in the assignment of 
portions of the land. 

(d) The Chronicles never fail to remark upon the usurpation of 
the sons of lolar, of the title of Erimionn. 

(e) It seems the people of Deas removed the land-marks. 

(/) This was a haughty reply of Laisne, not called for by the kind 
salutation of Erac. Whilst the mention of Erimionn served to in- 
flame Erac's anger. 

(g) This was the religious idea, but always combated by the 
Olam, who held, that the immortality of the spirit was the perpe- 
tuity of the knowledge and wisdom which man imparted and left (to 
use their expression) amongst men on earth. 

(h) Urlann is a staff, the place is this day called Hurling, or Z7r- 
Ungford. 



OF ERI. 21 



CHAP. IV. 

The reign of Erial, a space of seventeen rings, from 
988 to 971. 

Now there remained but two sons of lolar, Erial 
Ard Cruimtear, and Balb, the words of whose mouth 
were not to be understood : and the chiefs of Gael- 
en said, "Ard Cruimtear may not draw the sword: 
let the priests chuse another ; Erial must sit in the 
place of his father." (a) 

And Erial listened unto their voice, and JBiordac 
was Ard Cruimtear. 

Now the sons of Iber did carry high the head, 
stepping haughtily, calling Erac Erimionn, saying, 
" Are not the children of Iber the first-born of the 
hero ?" and they did trouble Gaelen. 

And the chiefs of Gaelen said unto Erial, " What 
if messengers be sent to Erac, to cease to vex the 
land? or" 
; And Erial did send unto Erac, saying, 

" Son of Iber, when our fathers won this land, 
were not the lots cast? did not Iber get his portion? 
and had not lolar, who was Erimionn, his division 
thereof? Were not the marks set up ? and did not 
our fathers swear, that they should there abide for 
ever? 

" And when Laisne did call on thee to fix the limits, 
earnest not thou forth with violence ? didst thou not 
slay Laisne and Luigne? and thou vauntest thyself, 
calling theeself Erimionn, which belongeth not unto 
thee. (I) 



22 CHRONICLES 

" The chiefs of Gaelen and Erial will have the 
marks set. Erial loveth peace, but he feareth not 
the sword. Let Erac say, Yea or nay ; no more." 

Now Erac called not together the chiefs of Deas; 
yet did he send unto Erial words ; and these were 
they : " Doth the blood of the horseman poured out 
on Ceseol yet smell in the nostrils of the eaglets? 
Attempt not too high a flight, lest thy wings be 
clipped, and a hook be put in thy nose, brood of 
lolar. Erac answereth, " Nay" (c) 

The young men would not listen to the voice of 
peace; headstrong, they were hurried away head- 
long. 

And when the chiefs of Gaelen heard the words, 
they all cried, ' To battle!" 

And the warriors of Gaelen were together on the 
hills of Earb : there did the host of Deas stand be- 
fore them, and there was the battle fought, from 
light even unto the failure thereof. 

And there did fall Erac, Eran, and Erbac. And 
the men of Gaelen returned to the lands of their 
dwelling. 

And Ernac, the remaining son odder, was chosen 
to rule in Deas. 

Er ruleth in peace; he turneth away his ear from 
the voice of the sons of Iber and lolar ; yea, he re- 
buketh them for their strife : and when they would 
that he should decide between them, he listeneth 
not to them in that neither. 

Erial dwelled in peace, save that one day on Earb > 
the time of seventeen rings, then he died. 



OF ERI. 23 

NOTES TO CHAPTER IV. 

(a) No person could rule if he had any defect of body or mind. 
This law was never violated. 

(b) The title of Erimionn was a constant source of jealousy and 
contention. 

(c) This passage, in the original, is full of keen satire. Marcad, 
the original name of Iber, signifies a horseman ; and lolar means an 
eagle. 



CHAP. V. 



The reign of Ete-Erial, a space of thirteen rings, 
from 971 to 958. 



was chosen to reign in Gaelen, in 
the place of his father, and he maketh his father his 
boast and his glory : he will tread in his steps in all 
his ways. 

J, even I, am that Eteerial, who write down these 
words, that they may be added for a perpetual me- 
morial of the days of Erial, and his son, for the eye 
of the race, and of the chiefs, yea, and of the Gaal in 
the times to come. 

For twelve rings and moreover, have I sat on the 
seat of my race, in the presence of the children of 
the land nought have I done of myself peace hath 
abided, my mind cleaveth to peace, (a) 

Maratel, the partner of the secret thoughts of Ete- 
erial, is no more, and two sons of Eteerial and 
Maratel are no more; Filiat abideth, 

The spirit of Eolus liveth in Eteerial, and will 
endure for ever, to light the people in the ways of 
truth ; the children of the land will warm their spirit 



24 CHRONICLES OF 

at the everlasting fire of Eolus. May the spirit of 
Eteerial abide amongst men with the spirit of his 



O that the race of Iber were like unto Er ! in 
truth hath he been suckled, in knowledge hath he 
been reared up, in wisdom is he strong ; he heareth 
the words of Eolus day after day, and he doth pro- 
fit therefrom. 

Er is like unto the oak, the seed whereof hath 
fallen on good ground, and its roots and fibres have 
been nourished by a sound and wholesome soil : Er 
is the friend and brother of Eteerial. 

Children of Golam, are we not brethren? 
Sons and daughters of Eri, love one the other. 
Eri of ours delightful beyond Gaelag of our fathers. 
Who hath seen Iber of our great fathers? Is Gaelag, 
yea, is Iber fair as Eri ? 

Gaol of Scioty hear the words of Eteerial. 

Sprinkle the devouring flame of your passions with 

the cool water of reason. Let the light of l?aaZglow 

within you, so will ye preserve yourselves from 

doing unto others what thou wouldst not have done 

unto theeself. Shun Casantir eider, go not to the 

land of metals. The children of Feine have fair 

words on their lips, their hearts are treacherous, the 

fire of their spirit burneth too fiercely ; is it not con- 

tinually fanned by the breath of avarice ? How ter- 

rible the fire of avarice ! Doth it not burn UD the de- 

sire of man toward that which is good ? 

Now doth Conmaol, the son of Erac, sit in the 

place of Ernac, already hath he stained his hands in 

the blood of Balb. Conmaol thirsteth for domi- 

nion. (c) 



OF ERI. 25 

And now Eteerial goeth to battle. 

Children of Gaelen, hear the words of Eteerial: 
should he return from the rage of Conmaol, he will 
rule as aforetime. Whence can the chief derive true 
glory but from the free praise of the people? Such 
was the glory of Erial, such is the glory of his son. 

What though Conmaol assembleth the warriors of 
Deas, Eteerial will not draw Er into the battle; if 
the men of Gaelen cannot limit the strides of Con- 
maol, troublous will be the days of Eri. 

And Eteerial did send by the hand of Marcad 
the writings of Eteerial; and Marcad did abide in 
the booth of Togher many days ; and Er did listen 
unto his words concerning Deas and Gaelen, and 
the words did pain our hearts. 

And Marcad took his departure; and Er said 
unto me, " Togher, write down all the words of 
Eteerial fit for the chronicles of the land ;" more- 
over Er added, (d) 

" How full of thanks is my mind unto Ordac, and 
unto thee, Togher, for giving a right direction to my 
reason, whereby my passions are in subjection there- 
unto continually. ; 

" Iber my son oweth thee no less ; still be assist- 
ing unto me, Togher, to guard him from the serpent 
flattery, whose mouth is filled with deceit, and from 
the worm envy, which corisumeth all the precious 
parts, leaving the offal, wherein to engender its per- 
nicious kind."(e) 

Now words came unto Er, " Eteerial, the wise 
and good, hath fallen on Ardcoran, there is his heap 
raised ;" the time of his rule being thirteen rings. 



26 CHRONICLES 



NOTES TO CHAPTER V. 

(a) Eteerial was a wise prince, and ruled according to law. 

(b) Here we have the opinion of the Olam. 

(c) Balb was a son of lolar, whom Conmaol slew. 

(d) Whatever more Eteerial wrote, the Olam did not think it fit 
for the chronicles of the land. 

(e) It may be said, how came our forefathers to have a name for 
a creature that did not exist in Eri ? The answer proves our race 
having originated in a country where snakes and lions were known: 
in the original the word is Nathair, the signification of which is a 
snake, at least so we always translate the word into the language in 
which I am writing. 



CHAP. VI. 

The reign o/*Coninaol, a space of one score and 
seven rings, from 958 to 931. 

FlLIAT, the son of Eteerial, was chosen to rule 
in Gaelen ; Conmaol calleth himself Erimionn. 

Now when the Gaol had abided in Eri two score 
and sixteen rings, two Ratha, and one day, Er, the 
son of Cier, died, having ruled for the course of two 
score rings and two. 

And all the children of the land gathered together 
to the tent, wherein lay Er in death, and a grievous 
lamentation was made. 

And when the days were fulfilled, the weight of 
Er was borne to Maginis; in that land hath his 
heap been raised. 

And I, Togher, was led by my brethren, for my 
eyes are dim, my limbs are weak ; slow were the 



OF ERI. 27 

steps of the congregation, loth to part from our be- 
loved, though no more. 

With a low* a slender, and a trembling voice, I 
feebly raised the death-song of the chief, all joined 
their voices to the voices of the harps. No war-song 
was heard, Er lived all his days in peace. 

And the bards and the minstrels told of Cier, the 
son of the hero, the father of Er, now laid in death ; 
borne on the tide of victory, forcing back the waves 
of Sruamac from spreading over the land ; now seek- 
ing the forms of his father and his brethren amongst 
the slain, now bearing them in triumph to the tents 
of Astiereis, and our shouts touched the heavens. 

Then they sung in lamentable strains, of Cier, 
overthrown by Baal himself in the great sea, and of 
the Gaol questing him amidst the rocks in the wa- 
ters of the vast deep, envying them the treasure they 
would have concealed. 

Now they sung, how the warriors undaunted 
e'en by the horrid frowns of raging Baal, bore his 
fine form to the summit of the rock, whose head 
doth peep above the fretted waves ; how they chaunt- 
ed his death-song, the winds howling as in sorrow 
for the havoc they had made ; how they poured forth 
his war-song, as when the hero was used to return 
with his fame from the battle, the sound of their 
voices lost in the roaring of the angry flood. 

Who so renowned as Cier in Gaelag of our fa- 
thers, who so glorious as Er in Eri. 

And when the stone was rolled to the entrance of 
the house of darkness, Aod, a chief of the land, 
raised his voice, and said, " Let this land be called 



28 CHRONICLES 

for the times to come ' THE LAND OF ULLAD/ a me- 
morial of the first of the race laid therein." (a) 

And I, Togher, have set down the words on the 
roll of the chronicles of the land. 

And Iber, the first-born of Er, was chosen to 
rule in Ullad, and I did stand before Iber, and I 
said unto him, " My eye hath endured to behold the 
heap beneath which is laid the form of thy father, 
and to set down words for other times up to this 
day. 

" Now suffer me to abide in the tent of my dwel- 
ling, I am no longer fit to sit on the seat of Ard 
Olam, the tongue of Iber will not gainsay his eye." 

And Iber did embrace Togher, saying, " Should 
Togher hear that the foot of Iber stray from the path 
on which he did direct that he should move, wilt 
not Togher tell him thereof as he was wont to do ?" 
Togher was silent, the fulness of his heart did deny 
utterance to the words he would have spoken. 

And Iber had the tent of Togher raised up nigh 
unto the tent of the chief. 

And Neact the son of Tol was chosen Ard Olam 
of Ullad. 

And Conmaol calleth himself Erimionn, evil is 
his mind towards the race of lolar ; the fall of Iber 
on Ceseol is still before his eye, still on his lips. 

And strife arose between Conmaol and Filial; 
and the Danan for the first time passed over the wa- 
ters of Seanamhan, and helped the men of Gaelen; 
but those of Gaelen could not stand before Con 
maol, and he wasted Oldanmact, and did put that 
land under tribute, (b) 



OF ERI. 29 

Peace abideth in Ullad; Iber walketh in the steps 
of his father in all his ways, and passages are open- 
ing through the land, and nine mounts are esta- 
blished ;(c) the youth are in the booths of the Olam. 

Now Filial, chief of Gaalen, was of a weak spirit, 
neither did he enquire of the blood of Balb the son 
of lolar, nor did he resist Conmaol, when he did 
spoil the borders, during one score and seven rings 
that he sat in the place of the chief. 

But when one score and seven rings were com- 
plete, and Filial died, and Tighernmas his son was 
chosen, the chiefs called on him to reclaim the lands 
within Oir and Ceas, that Conmaol had enforced ; 
and they roused him to fix the limits, and to main- 
tain them. 

And Tighernmas sent letters unto Conmaol, say- 
ing, " The portion of Eri-mionn doth not remain 
within Oir and Ceas ; what if the heads of the people 
were to meet from this side, and from that, and set 
up the marks where they did stand aforetime, and of 
right ought to stand ?" 

And Conmaol answered, " The portion of lolar 
doth remain, the marks are fixed, and may not be 
disturbed ; so saith Conmaol, who is Erimionn ?" (d) 

And Tighernmas sent the words to Conmaol, 
and the answer of Conmaol unto Iber; adding, 
moreover, " Will not Iber lend the strength of his 
arm to guard the borders of the nations of Eri ?" 

And Iber called for counsel, and he said unto the 
messenger, " Iber will not go forth of Ullad." 

And the anger of Tighernmas was kindled, and 
he assembled the warriors of Gaelen, and he sent 
defiance unto Conmaol. 



30 CHRONICLES 

And the battle was fought on Mag Aonac, there 
fell Conmaol, having ruled one score and seven 
rings, and there has his heap been raised, wonderful 
to behold. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER VI. 

(a) Ullad means a place of burial, from which the kingdom of 
Ullad, now Ulster, had its name. 

(b) This act of Conmaol, contrary to the covenant of Magmorti- 
omna, produced a good effect iii after times ; as the kings of Ullad 
never enforced this unjust imposition, by reason of which the bond 
of friendship was firm between Ullad and Oldanmaci, in consequence 
of which the balance of power was kept tolerably even. The king- 
doms of Deas and Gaelcn being generally opposed to Ullad, which 
was strengthened by the Danan ; as to Firgneat, they appear not 
ever to have been of any account. 

(c) These mounts were the Britetgne. 

(d) This expression may be taken in two ways, either that Con- 
maol said he was Erimionn, or asks the question, " Who is Erimi- 
onn?'' which last, according to the original, is the true reading. 



CHAP. VII. 

The reign of Tighernmas, a space of one score and 
seven rings, from 931 to 904. 

AONGUS the son of Conmaol was chosen to rule 
in Deas. 

And Tighernmas sent a messenger unto Aongus, 
saying, " At what time shall the heads of the peo- 
ple meet on Oir and Ceas, to fix the limits of the 
lands of Erimionn and of Iber ?" 

And Aongus called the chiefs ; and they would 



OF ERI. 31 

not answer to the words of Tighernmas : they sent 
back words, saying, 

" The land is the inheritance of the sons of the 
ra'ce, as to their portions, and of the chiefs ; yea, and 
of all the Gaal, according to the law of Tainistacht. 
The men of Deas know not of the lands of Iber, 
nor of Erimionn ; have not the words of Tigfam- 
mas come from the priests ?" 

And Tighernmas sent other words, calling the 
lands Deas and Gaelen. And the heads of the 
people met, and the marks are fixed, and there is 
peace, (a) 

Ullad enjoyeth repose. 

And when Iber had ruled one score rings and 
eight, he ceased, and the land mourned for him. 

And Iber his son was chosen, and he is called 
Iberic. When he had ruled for one ring, Neact 
died, and Felimd the son of Strot was chosen Ard 
Olam. (b) 

In these days came a ship, with men of Feine, 
with letters, saying, " Let my servants search through 
thy land for metals of precious things, if any such 
are to be found therein, and ye shall have one twen- 
tieth part, and my servants will pay for whatever 
they have from thee. Let there be a covenant be- 
tween thee and me." 

And Tighernmas took counsel within Gaelen; 
and he told the words of Feine: and the assembly 
called out, " It shall not be as Feine listeth ; deceit 
is in the heart, falsehood is in the tongue of Feine. 
Hath not Eteerial bad the Goal ' beware of Casan- 
tireider T Are not our brethren in the land of me- 
tals ? What if men of the Gaol abiding therein were 



32 CHRONICLES 

sent for ? cannot they live amongst their brethren 
here, and search in the bowels of this land ? Let no 
man hearken to the words of Feine" 

And it was so. 

And a vessel was made ready, and those who 
went therein returned as they went; they were not 
suffered to come to land, (c) 

And it came to pass in the days of Iberic, there 
came a ship to the inlet of the waters of the sea, nigh 
unto Buid-Cloc ; and those who were therein had 
the similitudes of the sun, moon, and the stars of 
Tarsnasc. And they told unto the priests, how 
Baal had given command to his servants to raise up 
a dwelling-place for Baal, and to set therein the 
likenesses, that Baal, and Re, and Treasnasc, may 
be always present before their eyes, (d) 

These words did the high-priest whisper 'into the 
ear of Tighernmas ; and he added moreover, "What 
if Tighernmas would assemble the people, and say 
unto them, ' Thus hath Baal spoken unto Tighern- 
mas, 

1 Am I too far from thee is my habitation too 
distant from the children of Eri? See that thou 
raisest up a pillar, and engrave thereon the sign of 
Sul, even me, and of Re, my dwelling-place, by 
night, and of Tarsnasc : (e) 

' And bow down before me, nigh unto thee, and 1 
will hear thy voice ; and my servants will whisper 
my answer into the ear of the people; and when 
thou askest aught of Baal, remember his servants, 
that it may be well with thee.'" 

And Tighernmas did and said according to the 
words of the high-priest ; and the priests said, " As 



OF ERI. 33 

Baal, the light, and heat, and life of the world, hath 
spoken unto Tighernmas, so be it ; blessed be Baal, 
blessed of Baal be Erimionn." 

And pillars were raised up nigh unto the mounts 
of the congregations of Gaelen, images of Sul, and 
Re, and Tarsnasc, set therein ; of gold, and silver, 
and brass, were the pictures. (/) 

Arid the priests bowed down before the pillars ; 
and Tighernmas humbled himself in the sight of the 
children of the land. 

And the congregations murmured, and raised a 
loud cry, saying, " Is the glory of sun, moon, and 
chief of the stars, to be confined within stones ? We 
will not bow the head, save to Baal only :" and they 
were of a mind to tumble down Cromcruad to the 
ground; howbeit their hands were stayed at that 
time, (g) 

And all the people were provoked with Tighern- 
mas because of Cromcruad ; and he did blame the 
priests in the hearing of the assembly. 

And when it came to the ear of the high-priest, 
that the priests were blamed of Tighernmas, he did 
creep privily to him, and he did say, " Shall the 
Gaol rise up against Baal and Erimionn? let the 
words go out from Erimionn, saying, * Let the con- 
gregations bow down before Cromcruad' " 

But Tighernmas would not, according to the words 
of the priest ; moreover, he repeated all his words in 
the hearing of the great congregation, (/i) 

And, behold, on the morrow, Tighernmas was 
found dead, as he lay within his tent. 

And the people called on the spirits of Erial and 
of Eleerial, and on the name of Tighernmas: and 

VOL. II. D 



34 CHRONICLES 

the high-priest told them, that the chief had been 
struck by Baal for his words spoken of the priests. 

And the people would look upon him, and lo, 
there was no mark on his body from Baal; and they 
fell upon the high-priest, and they slew him, and of 
the priests those whom they found : and Cromcruad 
was tumbled down wherever he was raised up. 

And the bards sung the death-song ; and the Gaol 
laid the weight of Tighernmas : no priest was there. 

Thus perished Tighernmas the son of Filial by 
the falsehood of the priests ; having ruled one score 
rings and seven. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER VII. 

(a) By the law of Tainistact, you have been informed of the re- 
gulation concerning the property of the territory, and very jealous 
were all the people of this law, here we have an instance of it. The 
words of Tighernmas, calling the lands of Erimionn and of Iber, 
gave so great offence, that the chiefs of Deas would not send an an- 
swer, till the lands were called by their proper names. 

(b) Iberic means a remedy, healing, or balm for Her. 

(c) The Phoenicians had heard of the emigration to, and settle- 
ment in, Eri of the Goal of Iber, and they came at this time to 
endeavour to get a footing here in the expectation* of finding 
metals. 

(d) This relation confirms the fact, that this Gael emigrated from 
Spain antecedently to the establishment of image-worship in Egypt 
and Phoenicia, which Sesostris first introduced in Spain. Had the 
emigration of our forefathers been later, it is not possible that they, 
in close communication with the Phoenicians, should not have heard 
of the innovation, more particularly as the visitations of the traders 
of that country, in consequence of the discovery of the mines of 
Breotan, were much more frequent on the coasts of Gaclag and 
Buasce : but our ancestors, having left Gaclag immediately after the 
irruption of Sesostris, we escaped the contagion with which it was 
now attempted by the priests of Gaelcn to infect king and people, 



OF ERI. 35 

for the advancement of the power and the increase of the wealth of 
the servants of Baal on earth. 

(e) For the meaning of all the proper names, consult the Glossary. 

(/) .Had the priests succeeded, their Asti would have been con^ 
verted into temples and oracles, as in Greece and Italy. 

(g) Cromcruad means " the pillar to bend before." 

(A) What a picture of art, imposture, and dissimulation ! What 
an exact similitude between all men, at all times, in pursuit of 
power and dominion ! 



CHAP. VIII. 

From the death 0/"Tighernmas to the death o/*FiO- 
caid, a space of eleven rings, from 904 to 8-93. 

Now when Tighernmas ceased by the hands of 
the priests, Erbot his son was in his youth. And 
in three moons died Aongus, chief in Deas, and 
Airt his first-born was in youth also, nor was there 
one of the race in Deas or Gaelen who could rule ; 
and Eri did call on Iberic to rule Erimionn, but he 
would not. 

And thus passed six rings, when Iberic died, 
having ruled one score and fourteen rings, and Ullad 
mourned for him. 

And Sobairce his first-born, the goodliest of the 
sons of Eri, was chosen to sit in the place of his fa- 
ther; and Ciermna, his brother of one birth, was 
but little inferior to Sobairce in outward form or 
inward worthiness. 

And now Eocaid the son of Daire, of the line of 
Ith, chief of Ib Lugad, took on him the name of 
Erimionn; he passed away his time trifling, his 

D2 



36 CHRONICLES 

mind bent more on the colours of raiment than on 
things useful to be known or dona 

Eri was troubled, words being spread abroad, 
" the Danan are holding talk with Firgneat privily." 

Now when Eocaid had called himself Erimionn 
for a course of nearly five rings, all the chiefs of 
Deas and Gaelen did send letters unto Sobairce and 
unto Ciermna, saying, 

" Will not the sons of Er listen to the voice of 
Eri, calling on them to guard her from the foemen, 
preparing to rise up against her? Will they not re- 
move Eocaid the son of Daire from the seat of the 
chief?" 

And Sobairce and Ciermna answering, said, " The 
sons of Er will remove Eocaid, and watch over 
Eri. n 

And ere Sobairce assembled the warriors, he sent 
a messenger of peace to Eocaid, saying, 

" Eocaid son of Ith hath not been chosen, nor 
doth it seem fit to the chiefs that he should rule : 
what if he remove to his own place?" 

But Eocaid delayed answer till Sobairce came 
upon him, and those about him fell off from him. 

And after two days Eocaid did send to Ciermna, 
by one who brought food unto him, to come to him, 
no covenant being made; and when Ciermna did 
not come so soon as the impatience of Eocaid looked 
for, he slew himself. 

Note. It appears that the king of Deas and the king of Gaelen, 
whichever conceived himself most powerful, arrogated the title of 
Erimionn; and now we find a prince of Ith, who, though of the 
royal line, was not strictly eligible to a throne, assuming the title of 
Erimionn also. 



OF ERI. 37 



CHAP. IX. 

The reign of Sobairce, a space of two score rings, 
lacking one ring, from the death of Eocaid, that is 
from 893 to 854. 

Now Sobairce sent messengers through the nations 
of Eri, saying, " Let the chiefs assemble on the 
plain of Almain out of hand, to meet Sobairce chief 
in Ulladr 

And the assembly were together, and they held 
talk, for Sobairce said, " I will do nought of my- 
self." 

And the chiefs of Gaelen did intreat Sobairce to 
rule over that land ; and the chiefs of Deas did be- 
seech Ciermna to sit in Deas. 

And Ciermna took his departure with the chiefs 
of Deas, and Sobairce returned to his place ; Erbot 
the son of Tighernmas along with him. 

And Felimid hath lived to see the sons of Er rule 
over all the Gaal in Eri : their minds are stored with 
wisdom, the words of Eolus are in their hearts. Now 
is discord banished from the land ; no more will our 
ears hear of the preparation of the Danan for battle. 
Felimid hath lived to a happy time ; his clays draw 
near unto an end. 

In one moon after Sobairce returned to Ullad, did 
Felimid breathe for the last time : and Catarac was 
was chosen Ard Olam. 

Sobairce hath given the Olam a charge to instruc 
Erbot in the ways of truth, and to repeat in his ear 
the words of Eolus continually. 



38 CHRONICLES 

v 

Now Sobairce raised up an house durable on the 
rock, that standeth above the waters of Foist ; (a) 
and Ciermna hath builded a house durable also on 
the summit that looketh out upon the world of wa- 
ters at the eastern extremity of Ib Lugad. (b) 

And the chiefs and all the people murmured when 
they saw and heard thereof; a thing not known to 
be done by our fathers aforetime. 

And when the words came to the ears of Sobairce 
and of Ciermna, they said, 

" Let not the chiefs nor the Gaol take fear unto 
them, that the sons of Er will do an injury unto them, 
how could they hurt the people and not endamage 
themselves ? 

" The gates of Dun Sobairce and of Dun Ciermna 
shall be open as wide, and as continually, as the mouth 
of the tent. 

" Nevertheless if the minds of the people are 
troubled because of this thing, let their full thoughts 
be declared ; short will be the time till the evil shall 
be removed out of sight." (c) 

And when the people heard the words, they said, 
" The strength of our hope is in Sobairce and Ci- 
ermna ; may the houses of the children of Er stand 
for ever !" 

Now Erbot was of the age, and Sobairce did go 
with him to Gaelenj and he called together the great 
congregation, and Sobairce presented Erbot to the 
assembly, and he said, 

" When the children of Eri did call on Sobairce 
to watch over Gaelen, for that not one of the race of 
lolar was of the age, and the Danan was said to 



OF ERI. 39 

threaten that land, Sobairce did listen unto their 
voice. 

" Gaelen is the portion of the sons oflolar, of whom 
is Erbot, no longer in youth. The Olam have in- 
structed him in lessons of truth and wisdom, which 
will teach him how to rule." 

And when Sobairce made an end, all being silent, 
after a while he said, 

" Was Sobairce a chief of Gaelen, he would say, 
What if Erbot the son of Tighernmas of the race 
of the hero sit on the seat of his fathers ?" 

And a shout was raised, and the assembly and 
all that were about the mount, cried aloud, " May 
jBaal prosper all the works of Sobairce the son of 
Er /" 

And Murcad, a chief of Gaelen, stood up, and 
said, " What if Erbot the son of Tighernmas of the 
race of the hero sit on the seat of his fathers ?" 

And all said, " Yea." 

And Sobairce laid a beautiful mantle of curious 
work on the shoulders of Erbot, and he did call me, 
Catarac, and he said, " B.ehold Catarac hath a pre- 
sent for Erbot r 

And I did give into the hands of Erbot the words 
of the writing of Eolus, and of Eteerial, and I did 
say, " Son of lolar, accept at my hands these words 
of thy great fathers, the wisest of the race. Before 
thy eyes heretofore have I set them, to thy heart I 
would have laid them ; thou wilt find in them food 
for thy mind, more delicious than the cool waters of 
the fountain to the parched lips of the hunter, as he 
raceth after his dogs, pursuing the deer on the sides 
of the naked hills, what time the sheep yieldeth his 



40 CHRONICLES 

cumbrous raiment to man, more provident for the 
times to come." 

And Erbot did lay the writings beneath his mantle. 
And now the boards were spread, and there was 
feasting, and music, and dancing, and tales of other 
times times of Gaeleg, yea, and of Iber, for full 
nine days. 

And Sobairce returned to Ullad, and Erbot and 
all the chiefs of Gaelen attended his steps on his 
homeward way to the waters of Ramhar, which rim 
between the nations of Ullad and of Gaelen; and 
\ve did pass by the way that Sobairce hath opened 
throughout from thence even to Dun Sobairce. 

Now did Sobairce send a messenger unto Cierm- 
na, saying, " Airt the son Aongus is of the age ; 
the eye of Sobairce doth long to look upon his bro- 
ther." 

And Ciermna assembled the chiefs of Deas, and 
they did choose Airt the son of Aongus. 

And Ciermna returned towards Ullad, and a great 
company moved with him, now of one land, now of 
another, to the limits of Deas ; and multitudes sur- 
rounded his way through Gaelen. 

And when he touched the border of Ullad, he 
came down from his horse; and he bowed the head, 
and he bathed his body in the waters of Ramhar: 
and when he stood on the land of Ullad, he kissed 
the earth. 

And Sobairce moved on the way that Ciermna 
was a coming the journey of two days ; and they did 
meet in the vale of Bearna : and when they were yet 
far distant, they did come down from their horses, 
and they did run with all their speed to meet each 



OF ERI. 41 

other, and they embraced tenderly, tears of joy rush- 
ing from their eyes. 

And a huge stone is set up on the spot, on the 
one side of which is engraved the name of Sobairce, 
and on the other the name of Ciermna. 

And the boards were spread at Dun Sobairce, 
and there was feasting for one entire moon, even the 
moon Cruining all were bidden : tents were raised 
all about, and the song, and the voice of the harp was 
heard, and the tales of other times; and the dance 
and the chase passed days and nights away in joy 
and gladness. 

And the day before the congregation were to be 
separated, they were called to one place, and boards 
were raised up in the midst; and Leaf, one of the 
Olam, was lifted up thereon : Leat, whose voice is 
strong, and the sounds thereof are sweet. 

And J, Catarac, did give into his hands, the writ- 
ing of Eolus, and the roll of the chronicles, up to 
the day on which Leat was standing in the presence 
of the children of the land, and Leat did read the 
words aloud ; and the joy of amazement ran through 
the congregation. 

And all the chiefs, and Olam, and priests, bards 
and minstrels, and all the Gaal, and the matrons and 
damsels, all raised up their hands towards the hea- 
vens ; and they did beseech Baal to prosper all the 
works of Sobairce and of Ciermna, the glory of the 
Gaal, the sword and buckler of the land. 

.Now peace is on every side: the Danan seek the 
love of the men of Ullad. Firgneat join themselves 
to us, fearing nothing. 

And Airt and Erbot did journey to Dun Sobairce. 



42 CHRONICLES 

Erbot inclirieth unto the priests ; he hath, or seemeth 
to have, forgotten the lessons of the Olam. 

It happed on a day that Sobairce did speak of 
words of Eolus unto Erbot, who knew them not; 
and Sobairce did inquire of the writings Catarac did 
give unto him in Gaelen; when Erbot said, Ard 
Cruimtear did remove them from my tent, saying, 
they are the work of the Olam, who speak evil of 
J3aal and his servants continually. 

Airt delighteth in sports and music, and the song 
and dance, more than in wisdom. 

Sobairce and Ciermna lament unto me, Catarac, 
the gloominess of Erbot, and the trifling levity of 
unthinking Airt. 

When Sobairce had ruled for the course of one 
score rings and one, Catarac died, and Leat was 
chosen Ard Olam. 

Ways are making through the land ; the Gaal in- 
crease cattle abound the Olam are heard know- 
ledge is in respect. Five congregations are added 
through Ullad: day followeth day; as the things 
are of one day, so of the next. Ullad is as the infant 
reposing on the breast of the mother, after sucking 
the pap. (d) 

When Sobairce had ruled for one score rings and 
twelve, Leat died, and Nid was chosen Ard Olam. 

And when Sobairce had ruled one score and 
seventeen rings over Eri, Erbot, chief in Gaelen, 
died, and Smior Gaal his son was chosen. 

And ere that moon did wane, Airt the son of 
Aongus, chief in Deas, died also ; and the chiefs did 
not come to the mount for eight moons that lacked 
of his full age ; then they did choose Eocaid his son. 



OF ERI. 43 

And when Sobairce had ruled for the circuit 01 
two score rings and four, he sickened and died ; 
and his heap hath been raised, as he did bid, nigh 
unto the mount of Ullad. 

For he said, If at any time the mind of the chief, 
or the thoughts of the people, should be unruly, per- 
adventure they will return into the way of reason, 
when they think on Sobairce laid beneath the heap 
before them. 

And ere the twelfth day was to a-i end, from the 
day that Sobairce ceased, Ciermna ceased also ; his 
spirit, though great, could not endure existence, 
Sobairce being no more. 

And the heap of Ciermna is raised nigh unto the 
heap of Sobairce, as though he had ruled in Ullad; 
and Ullad mourneth, and long will mourn for So- 
bairce and Ciermna. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER IX. 

(a) This is the first mention of an house, according to our present 
acceptation of the word, in the history of this Gaal. 

(b) This house was called Dun Sobairce. See the Glossary and 
Map ; as also for Dun Ciermna. 

(c) This is language worthy of a wise man and a good prince ; 
such conduct alway serves to inspire the people with confidence in 
their rulers. The modern practice of oligarchies, who have usurped 
the government of the whole of Europe, is never to concede any 
thing to the wishes of the people, however just or moderate they 
may be ; for which reason, the people have no confidence in the 
usurpers, who depend for the continuance of t eir powe , not on 
the affections, but the corruption of the people ; and ndeavour to 
extenuate their offence by charging the corrupted with the guilt to 
which they have enticed them. 

(d) What is translated congregations, is ~Britetgnc, or fire-hill, as 
heretofore explained. 



44 CHRONICLES 

CHAP. X. 

The reign of Q\\\\o\, a space of one score and four 
rings, from 854 to 830. 

WHEN the chiefs of Ullad were called to the mount, 
they chose Oilliol the son of Sobairce. 

Now Eocaid, chief in Deas, raised his hand high, 
and his voice higher, in threats against the Danan ; 
and he sent an herald to demand tribute not due; 
and if not paid out of hand, to say, in the hearing of 
Seorl, chief of that land, that the warriors of Deas 
would pour into Oldanmact. 

And Seorl sent the words of Eocaid by the mouth 
of his messenger unto Oilliol, and to say moreover, 

" It hath been told unto the Danan, that when 
the pillar was raised up for a memorial of the cove- 
nant between their fathers and the race of I her, your 
fathers of that day did shape figures, rolled one upon 
the other, that tell why the stone was set up, and 
shew that they were not to pass over the waters of 
the great river to trouble Oldanmact; and that the 
figures then formed remain together within the house 
of the chief of Ullad even unto this day. Now Eo- 
caid, chief in Deas, calling himself Erimionn, threat- 
eneth to pass over the river, against the will of the 
Danan, demanding tribute. Therefore Seorl and the 
Danan would know, if Oilliol will stop the foot of 
Eocaid, the covenant being as Seorl sayeth, or to 
that like." 

And Oilliol said, " The words of the covenant 



OF ERI. 45 

do abide within the booth of the Ard Olam ; thou 
shalt hear them." 

And Nid, even I, did open the roll of the chroni- 
cles ; and words were read as Seorl had declared 
by the mouth of his messenger. 

And Oilliol inquired the cause of the wrath of 
Eocaid; and the man answered, "The JDanan, from 
the chief to the Clod, have done nought." (a) 

Whereupon Oilliol said unto the messenger, " Say 
thou unto SeorL Oilliol will send unto Eocaid to 
refrain, and if he will persist wrongfully, Oilliol will 
then declare unto him what he intendeth." 

And the man took his departure, and Oilliol did 
send letters unto Eocaid, saying : 

" Words have come from Seorl unto the ear of 
Oilliol; ' Eocaid doth threaten to pass over the 
waters of Seanamhan, under pretence of exacting 
tribute;' and Oilliol addeth, Why tribute to Eo- 
caid? why calleth Eocaid himself Erimionn? Oil- 
liol will fulfil the oath of his father, sworn on 
Magmortiomna y even against a son of Iber. There- 
fore," (6) 

And Eocaid refrained, and peace abided. 

Oilliol walketh in the path of his fathers ; more- 
over he maketh circ'iits through Ullad ring after 
ring, sojourning now in the tents of one, then of 
another, looking into the conditions of the children 
of the land : and the gates of Dun Sobairce are open 
at all times, for the entrance of chiefs, and the 
Gaal. 

Now when Oilliol had ruled for the course of one 
score and two rings, it happed that Smior Gaal went 



46 CHRONICLES 

to the tents of Iber, where the half of Eri was as- 
sembled for the chase. 

And whilst the hunters were together, the boards 
were spread, the horns went round, the nights pass- 
ed away in song, the harps, and the dance. 

And one morning, after Smior Gaol had heated 
himself in the dance, and the horns had been emp- 
tied to excess the night before, he plunged into the 
waters of Sior, and long time passed not till his skin 
was hot, his frame was as in fire; yet did he hunt 
the whole day long, and thus kept struggling with 
distemper, till forced to become companion to his 
bed by night and day : and he did rage. 

The hunters now began to move towards their 
dwellings, and Eocaid was troubled sore because of 
Smior Gaal, hearing that he was in doubtful case to 
live or die. 

And Eocaid went to the tent wherein Smior Gaol 
lay, to comfort him. And on the fifth day did Smior 
Gaol die. 

And Eocaid was not at ease, yet he went to and 
fro, as he was wont, in open air, till the subtle poison 
imbibed from Smior Gaol ran through all his frame, 
and on the fifth day also from the time he sickened, 
did Eocaid die. 

And many were they who were swept off in Deas 
in like manner. 

And Mogfeil the son of Eocaid was chosen to 
rule in Deas. 

And Fiaca the son of Erbot was placed on the 
seat of the chief in Gaelen. 

And when Oilliolhzd ruled in Ullad for the course 



OF ERI. 47 

of one score rings and four, in truth and justice, he 
died. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER X. 

(a) This Danan word, Clod, must mean one of the lowest degree : 
Cloden was the term applied by the Danan to the aborigines of this 
island. 

(b] It has been the practice of those who have put together bardic 
tales of Eri, to give a regular catalogue of chief kings, from the fall 
of Iber on Ceseol elected as it were by constituted authorities. You 
see by these chronicles (the only authentic record that hath escaped 
the tooth of time, and the destroying hands of Danes and English), 
that the assumption of the title was an usurpation not warranted 
by law. 



CHAP. XL 

The reign of Daire, a space of seventeen rings, from 
830 to 813 

IT was against the will of Daire that he was placed 
on the seat of his father : he said, " My frame is 
weakly, and if Ullad should be troubled !" 

But the chiefs would not pass on to another of 
the sons of Oilliol; and whilst Daire sat amongst 
the Olam and the bards, and touched the strings of 
the harp, Eocaid his brother did bestir himself for 
the chief. 

And when Daire had sat during one ring, Nid 
died, and Grad was chosen Ard Olam. 

Now when Daire had ruled for six rings, it came 
to pass, that Cuil, chief of the Danan, stirred up the 
Firgneat, saying. 



48 CHRONICLES 

" The strangers have evil minds towards us ; they 
be weak ; do they not slay each other in Deas and 
Gaelen ? (a) 

" Let us join our hands together; ye shall have 
one quarter of Gaelen'' 

And Firgneat did spread themselves from the 
borders of the waters that wash the lands of their 
dwellings ; and they did join themselves to the Da- 
nan, and a great multitude they were; and they 
moved towards Gaelen. 

And when words came to Fiaca, " The Danan 
and Firgneat are moving towards the land," he call- 
ed together the chiefs, and Morad stood up and said, 
" What if a messenger be sent to Daire, to drive 
back the waves that threaten the land ?" (6) 

And Colgar stood up in haste, and said, "Who 
is he that will write the words ? Shall the hand be 
upon a pen, not on the sword ? Whilst Scriobnoir 
is writing for help, where will be our flocks and 
herds ? where the glory of the Gaol r And all cried, 
" To battle !" 

And they met on Mag Duor ; and the men of 
Gaelen had the worst: howbeit, they turned not 
their backs, and the Danan and Firgneat advanced 
into the land. 

And on the morrow, as the multitude were pass- 
ing towards the sun's rising, Fiaca bad Colgar, 
" Take with thee a chosen band of youths, and 
haste behind the foe, and thence rush upon them 
with uproar." 

And Colgar did so ; and whilst those with 
Fiaca met them in front, those with Colgar were 
on their backs ; and when Firgneat felt the weight 



OF ERI. 49 

of the Gaal they escaped as they could ; but Danan 
proved men, many were the warriors of Oldanmact 
who fell on that day, for they said, " Are we worthy 
to live, if we cannot stand on the land of our fa- 
thers ?" and many of the Gaal fell also 

And they returned each to their own lands, bear- 
ing evil minds to each other. 

Now when Daire came to hear of these things, his 
mind was troubled, for he said, " Should Iber join 
himself to Fiaca, and part Oldanmact, it will fare 
ill with Ullad: (c) 

And Daire sent Eocaid his brother unto Cuill, to 
learn of a truth the cause of the passing of the Dan- 
an into Gaelen ; that if it should appear the Danan 
were not transgressors, Eocaid may whisper words 
of comfort in his ear. 

And Eocaid discovered that Fiaca and Mogfeibe 
had been harassing Oldanmact for a long while ; 
moreover, that the messenger sent from Cuill unto 
Dun Sobairce with tidings thereof, had been laid 
hold on, and put under an oath in the presence of 
the earth, in the hearing of the waves of the sea, that 
he would say unto Cuill, " The chief of Ullad would 
not listen unto the words of my lips." 

Whereupon Eocaid said unto Cuill, " Cuill, hear 
the words of Daire from the mouth of Eocaid his 
brother. Let not the Danan break the covenant of 
M agmortiomna ; and if the children of Iber do not 
observe the same for the times to come, let Cuill 
send words by a sure tongue to the chief of largael: 
so will they come to the ear of Daire; then will the 
warriors of Ullad haste to help the Danan." (d) 

VOL. II. E 



50 CHRONICLES 

And Eocaid returned to Dun Sobairce. 

And Daire preserved Ullad in peace all his days, 
of seventeen rings that he ruled ; then did he sicken 
and die. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER XI. 

(a) In ancient days it was a thing unknown for tribes and the 
people of the same community to destroy each other ; domestic 
butchery was reserved for polished ages, for more advanced stages 
to civilization of the perfectible animal, man. Insatiable appetite for 
power hurried the chiefs of Deas and Gaelen into the commission of 
frightful excesses, which it is not my intention to extenuate ; at the 
same time I beg of those English, who are in the habit of stigmatis- 
ing us with every foul epithet their language furnishes, to review 
the pages of their own history, tolerably authentic ; exempt as it is 
from captivating figures of fine imagination, unclouded by mists of 
fable, on the shoulders of which the mantle of antiquity was never 
laid. 

(6) It is observable that the figure generally presented for an hos- 
tile invasion is a flood, as you may hare seen in divers passages in 
these Chronicles, and in the Dissertation. Which* instances could 
be given five hundred fold, was it necessary. 

(c) From this passage you can understand the policy of Ullad t 
which you will find adhered too invariably, and which throws con- 
siderable light on the true state of En'. 

(d) The reason of sending to the chief of largaal was, to prevent 
the danger of the messenger from Oldanmact to Dun Sobairce beinj 
intercepted. largaal is this day called Donegal. 



CHAP. XII. 

The reign of Eocaid, a space of sixteen rings, from 
813 to 797. 

EOCAID the son of Oilliol, and brother of Daire, 
was chosen chief in Ullad. 



OF ERh 5} 



Now there was amity between the sons of Iber 
and of lolar : the children of lolar were touched at 
heart because of the tenderness of Eocaid to Smior- 
gael 

And what time Eocaid had ruled five years in 
Ulfad; Fiaca sent Fionn his son to Mogfeibe to say 
unto him, 

" So long as Ullad is in friendship with the Dan- 
an, to move and stay them, and Firgneat at his 
pleasure, there will be no safe footing for the sons 
of Iber nor of lolar. What if Mogfeibe join his 
strength to the weight of Fiaca to the feeling of 
Oldanmact ?" 

Now Mogfeibe being no way subtle, and Fionn 
being young, moreover not knowing that the words 
were secret words for Mogfeibe's ear, Mogfeibe said 
unto Fionn, " 1 will send an answer at such a time." 

And Mogfeibe assembled the chiefs, Daire chief 
of Ib Lugad being present : and Mogfeibe repeated 
the words of Fionn, but the assembly would not ac- 
cording thereunto. 

And long time passed riot till Mogfeibe died, and 
Eocaid his son was chosen. 

And Fiaca journeyed to the tents of Eocaid, in 
hopes to persuade him to enter Oldanmact; but the 
chiefs of Deas would not consent thereto. 

Urged by the vehemence of his passion to destroy 
the Firgneat, for they were despised of him, he as- 
sembled a small company, enough as he thought, 
and with these did he move to Maggeintir. (a) 

What though Firgneat were taken unawares, yet 
did they run together, and they d-id surround Fiaca. 

E 2 



62 CHRONICLES 

and all that were with him ; and they did smite the 
men of Gaelen sorely, and they did slay Fiaca. 

And they drew the body of Fiaca to the margin 
of their land, and they flung it into the waters of 
Aron . 

Thus perished Fiaca, and Fionn his son was cho- 
sen to rule in Gaelen. 

And when Eocaid had ruled seven rings, Grad 
died, and Deirim was chosen ArdOlam. 

Eocaid walketh in the steps of his father, he de- 
lighteth in that which is good; Ullad is in repose, 
Eri resteth in the calm of peace. 

And when he had ruled sixteen rings he died, 
and the land mourned for him. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER XII. 

(a) Dull of apprehension, slow to avenge even flagrant wrongs, it 
appears the Firgneat were not insensible to insult and contempt, the 
original word diomeas denoting that Fiaca had spoken of them in 
terms of reproach contemptuously though the particular instances 
are not mentioned ; and to retaliate, even after life, they treated his 
body in the manner most mortifying to his race, as though he had 
been a murderer, 



CHAP. XIII. 

The reign of Eolus, a space of one score and nine 
rings, from 797 to 768. 

EOLUS sitteth on the seat of his fathers ; he is not 
exceeded by one of the race for wisdom. 

He hath journeyed through Ullad ring after ring, 



OF ERI. 53 

and visiteth the booths of the Olam, and sitteth 
amongst them, hearing and giving lessons of know- 
ledge continually, now six rings that he hath ruled. 

And now he moved towards Deas, I, Deirim, 
in his company. He had a strong desire to see Eo- 
caid chief of that land : the report of Eocaid is good, 
he loveth truth and justice and peace more than 
any of his race since the Gaol first touched JEri. 

And Eolus and Eocaid exchanged vows of friend- 
ship all their days. 

And as Eolus was returning through Gaelen, he 
tarried awhile at the tents of Fionn: all the efforts 
of Eolus to lead him in the path of wisdom availed 
not the priests have taken dominion of his reason. 

Great was the joy when Eolus returned to Dun 
Sobaircc. And when Eolus had ruled for nine 
rings, he sent messengers through Ullad, saying, 
44 Let the congregation be gathered together at the 
mount of Dun Sobairce, what time jBaal shall enter 
his house Sgith." 

And when the time came, a great multitude was 
assembled, and Eolus rose in the midst, and he said, 

" It is the wish of Eolus that the number of the 
Olam be increased, and that three booths durable 
be established in divers parts of the land, where provi- 
sion might be made for the Olam and for the youths : 
therefore if it seemeth good, what if three schools be 
builded, one at Druimcrit, one at Druimmor, and 
one at Dun Sobairce here, and nine Olam abide in 

each?" () 

And the words were heard by all with gladness; 
and it was so. And when Eolus had ruled for ten 
rings, words came to Dun Sobairce that Eocaid 



54 CHRONICLES 

Mumo, chief in Deas, had ceased, being flung from 
his horse in passing over on the hurdles on the wa- 
ters of Sior, where they glide between Arda, and 
there was he drowned. 

And a mighty heap hath been raised on the far 
side of the river, and the heap is called Mumain, and 
from thence is all Deas aforetime called MUMAIN 
in respect for the chief. (&) 

And Glas the son of Noid, the son of Eocaid 
Faobarglas was chosen to rule in Mumain. 

And when Eolus had ruled fourteen rings, Fionn 
chief of Gaelen died, and Aongus the son of Fiaca 
was chosen. 

Now the mind of Aongus was evil towards the 
Danan and to Firgneat ; he remembered the death 
of his father, and he took to heart the m'anner 
thereof, which he laid to the Danan; how be it they 
had no share therein ; and he sought pretences, now 
one, then another, to do them injury. 

And he sent a messenger to demand tribute, and 
whe-n Forb, chief in Oldanmact, asked, " What tri- 
bute?" he was answered, " Eiric for the blood or 
my father." The Danan were amazed at hearing the 
words, yet did they know the mind of Aongus 
thereby. 

And after a while the warriors of Gaelen came 
upon Oldanmact unawares, and the Danan tied from 
the presence of Aongus towards the sun's going, not 
having time to send words to the chief of largaeL 

And the Gaol pursued after them ; st-il.! the Danan 
kept on flying before the-m, feigning fear. 

And when the Gaol had gotten entangled in the 
midst of the hills, the Danan rose up against them, 



OF EKI. 55 

and many of the Gaol fell, and Mai, a chief of Gaelen, 
fell also. 

Now Aongus was not with the host ; the moon 
was at the palest ; Aongus yet lay in his tent, Sana, 
the delight of his soul, nigh unto him. And one 
came running to the tent of the chief, and told what 
happed : and Aongus trembled, for he did not yet 
know that J3aal was in the chamber of his rest, (c) 

But when he heard that Baal had not come forth, 
he was rejoiced, and said, " Good, our fathers drew 
not the sword till JBaal looked out upon them." 

And Aongus hasted to the battle, the hills were 
covered with the foe : Aongus strode in his strength, 
and his strength was terrible. 

The Danan fought valiantly ; all could not avail 
against Albuadac ; great was the slaughter of that 
day. And when the men of Gaelen stood round 
Aongus after the battle, he said aloud, " Let these 
hills be called Cealg for the times to come, because 
of the treachery of the Danan." (d) 

And Aongus wasted Oldanmact, and he laid Cios 
for Eiric on the land, vengeance for the blood of his 
father ; for he said, the Danan were helping untp 
Firgneat ; but that was not so : and he doubled the 
tribute, calling himself Erimionn. 

And Aongus turned his face toward Maggeinim, 
with intent utterly to root out Firgneat ; and as he 
was about to enter that land, lo ! the warriors of Ullad 
were moving towards Oldanmact, words having 
passed from mouth to ear, even unto Dun Solairce, 
of the doings of Aongus. 

And now Eolus sent the warriors, and three of 



56 CHRONICLES 

his brethren, Oilliol, Ruidruide, and Ros, to aid 
the Danan. 

Oilliol staid the foot of the host, whilst Ruidruide 
and Ros rode towards Aongus ; and when they 
reached within the hearing of their voices by the 
men of Gaelen, they came down from their horses, 
their swords in their left hands, their shields at their 
backs, their mantles girded close, and they moved 
on their feet towards Aongus. 

And Ros raised his voice, and said, " We have 
hither come according to the words of Eolus to say 
unto Aongus, "The Firgneat against whom thou 
raisest up the sword are of Ullad, and the children 
of Er have sworn unto them, and the covenant of 
peace is between them and us. 

" What hath been done is done. Have the Firgneat 
joined themselves unto the Danan? Let Aongus 
search them out through Oldanmact, they are war- 
riors, their hand's upon the sword : why spoil the 
lands of those who abide in their dwellings? 

" Hath Aongus an evil mind towards Firgneat ? 
Shall it be said in times to come, The Gaol of 
Sciot of Iber turned their backs on men, to war 
with the earth, and dwellings, and women and chil- 
'dren ?" and Ros repeated the words aloud in the 
hearing of the Gaol. 

And the words of Ros were pleasing in the ears 
of the Gaal, and Aongus took counsel, and returned 
to Gaelen. 

And Oilliol sent a messenger, even the chief of 
largael, with words unto Forb, that Forb may 
know Don for times to come. 



OF ERI. 57 

And the hearts of the Danan beat warmly in love 
for Ullad, and the race of Er. 

And there is peace, for Glas doth walk in the 
steps of Mumo ; he would have the youth of his 
land instructed in lessons of truth; his voice is of no 
account, the children of Mumain are more inclined 
to sports, and music, and tales of the bards; but 
Glas preserved the land in peace all his days, of nine 
rings that he ruled ; then he died, and Eunda the 
son of Eocaid Mumo was chosen. 

At this time died also Deirim, Ard Olam of Ullad, 
and Dub was chosen in his place. 

Peace abideth ; Eunda, yea, and Aongus listen to 
the voice of Eolus: he holdeth on in the ways of 
truth and justice, never stepping aside from the les- 
sons of his great father, the sure guide thereto. 

And four congregations are established, and nine 
booths are on the passages through Ullad, to minis- 
ter to the wayfaring and to the stranger, far from the 
voice of his kindred. Eolus toileth without ceasing 
for the good of Ulad.(e) 

When Eolus had ruled one score rings and eight, 
Aongus, chief in Gaelen, died, and Maine his bro- 
ther was chosen. 

And when Eolus had ruled for the course of one 
score rings and nine, he did feel as though he had 
run his course to the view of the utmost end ; and 
he bad those about him to raise up the tent of the 
chief, midway between the mount of Ullad, and the 
booth of the Olam of Dun Sobairce. 

And when it was told unto Eolus, that his tent 
was fixed, he said, " Let my weight be borne hence, 



58 CHRONICLES 

and Jaid within my tent, that I may cease therein, 
as my fathers did, no soil on Sobairce from my 
words." (/) 

And it was so: and when he was placed within 
the tent, he felt inclined to sleep ; and sleep came 
over him, and his spirit was refreshed therefrom. 
And he called for me, Dub, and he said unto me, 
" Let my sons be gathered together, even here, that 
I may see and speak to them ere that I die." 

And when the youths did stand in the presence 
of their father, Dub within the tent, Eolus raised 
himself up, and he opened his mouth, and said, 

" My sons, a treasure hath been committed to 
my care by Eocaid, my father, entrusted to him by 
his father, and so from father to son, from genera- 
tion to generation. Whether it hath suffered aught of 
diminution in my hands hath no doubt been judged, 
though the truth will not be declared in full till I 
shall be beneath the heap." 

Now Eolus perceiving that the young men looked 
one upon another with inquiring eyes, as in conjeo 
ture of a treasure so long concealed, of which they 
had not heard afore, he said, 

" Ye seem in wonder at the mention of a hoard, 
which till now ye heard not of. Think ye that J have 
great possessions in flocks and herds, and many 
horses, and a store of dogs ; that the apparel of ray 
house is of great worth, and metals had from within 
the bosom of the earth ; that costly arms are mine? 

" Be undeceived ; of these and of such like I have 
not more nor less as J know of than my gone father 
had. Howbeit, Dub, let me hope that Eolus hath 



OF ERI. 59 

increased the store he cometh now not to part 
amongst these bis sons ; nay, he will give all to each, 
no severance made. 

" To all of you, my sons, and unto each, I leave 
the treasure, reputation a good name. It will en- 
dure with care, should all else fail the care yield- 
ing the highest gratification to the spirit of man ; all 
the race will be partakers of this inheritance with ye, 
ID y sons. 

" In nothing will ye run so great a risk of loss of 
any portion of this vast treasure, as by suffering 
your passions to diminish the love ye ought to bear 
one towards another ; whereby the band would be 
loosened, that should firmly unite you. 

" O my sons, beware of vanity. Let not the 
gaudy fly approach too nigh unto you. Crush be- 
neath thy feet the worm Envy, that consumeth the 
heart's blood, and changeth the colour of the eye of 
man. 

" Ye feave the words of our great father, whose 
name I bear preserve them in your memories : they 
have been the guide of thy father let them be thine, 
rny sons. 

" The spirit of Eolus yet abideth with me: may it 
abide with you, and be immortal, to light his race, 
and all the children of the land to glory and to hap- 
piness ! 

" Few words more: 

" From this tent let not thy father be removed ; 
hitherto hath my weight, enlivened by rny spirit, 
been borne : suffer not my form to be touched in 
death : here let the heap be raised over me, if the 
children of Ullad shall think me worthy of memo- 



60 CHRONICLES 

rial. Go now, my sons, unto Dun Sobairce, and 
there abide till ye shall hear*of me." 

But they besought their father to permit them to 
raise up their tents nigh unto him. And Eolus was 
touched at heart; tears flowed from him he wept 
aloud : the youths looked on their father, then on 
each other, making no effort to smother their grief. 

When Eolus found utterance for his words, he 
said, " How pleasing are the words of my children 
to my ears, how refreshing to my feeble spirit! Do 
abide near unto your father, tha*t his eyes may look 
on his children whilst Baal yet affordeth his light." 

Now when it was spread abroad, that Eolus lay 
on the bed of sickness within his tent, chiefs, and of 
the Gaol in multitudes, swarmed around him ; and 
when he heard the humming of the voices, he in- 
quired, and Ros told unto him, " The children of 
the land stand about thy tent, to know what service 
they can render unto my father." 

And Eolus said, " It is good : this is a sign unto 
me, that my labour hath been well accepted. Be- 
hold the full reward !" And he clasped his hands, 
and said, " O that my spirit may abide with the 
spirit of my fathers amongst the children of Eri for 
ever !" 

And he said unto Ros, 

" Go forth, my son, and take unto thy tents the 
chiefs, and the Olam; and let the boards be spread, 
and for the Gaal, and the women, and the little 
ones, that they may be comforted." And it was so. 

And Eolus watched the whole night through ; 
and ere Baal had reached the summit of his next 
day's course, Eolus breathed for the last time. 



OF ERI. 61 

Now when it was known that Eolus had ceased, 
a loud and grievous lamentation was heard ; and the 
lower part of the tent was raised up, and the entire 
congregation moved one after the other round the 
tent; and they did look upon the form of the chief: 
and they lifted up their hands and eyes towards the 
heaven, and besought Baal to take the spirit of Eo- 
lus nigh unto him, and to give him power and do- 
minion over evil spirits of the air. And the Olam 
said aloud, " Children of Ullad, inhale the spirit of 
Eolus ; let it be preserved for ever." (g) 

And when the day came, that the heap of Eolus 
was to be raised, and the congregation were toge- 
ther, trunks of trees were fixed up round about the 
tent, wherein lieth the form of Eolus ; and the tops 
of the trees leaned one against each other, and on 
them was piled up the heap, beneath which his bulk 
abideth as he ceased, according to his words. 

And the death-song of the chief was raised by me, 
Dub, and chanted by the voices of the children of the 
land. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER XIII. 

(a) Before this regulation of Eolus, the Otam instructed the youth 
at their booths ; none, therefore, could have attended the Olam but 
those of the neighbourhood ; the inconvenience of which being 
felt, three seminaries, or colleges (in the original, " Mur Ofam&n," 
the wall of the teachers, denoting the durability of the dwelling), 
were now established, for nine Olam each, and lands assigned for 
the maintenance of teachers and disciples, who abided within the 
schools from the time they put on the " Brat" or close cloke, till 
that of wearing the F'olan, or open mantle ; neither age mentioned 
that I know of. 

(6) The kingdom of Deas (the south, and also the right side, or 
hand, that point being on the right when the face is towards the 



02 CHRONICLES 

east) was qow called " Mumain" " respect for Mumo" from the 
heap raised over him, as Ullad had its name for the like reason. 
Look on the Map for the situation of the place. This kingdom is 
now Munster, a word of no meaning ; according to English custom, 
sufficient for the purpose, if it disfigures the venerable features of 
antiquity. 

(c) This Gaol held it dishonorable to attack a foe by night. 

(d) Here is proof of the proneness of man to give good or evil 
report of the same action, according to the doer. Aongus calls the 
hills " Cealg," that is, " deceit," because of the trick of war prac- 
tised by the Danan, which the Danan, no doubt, considered a fair 
stratagem, and which Aongus, had he done the like, would have 
called address and prudence. Will man never desist from impos- 
ture ? Never, whilst the multitude are so easily imposed on, as really 
to seem pleased with deception. 

(e) Considering that Ullad enjoyed an uninterrupted state of 
peace and repose for two hundred and thirty years, their march 
would appear slow, were not the state of the land covered over with 
woods and stagnate waters in a great measure, and the paucity of 
the Gaal on their arrival, " a thin host, by the power of Baal" as 
Marcad said, taken to account. These booths were called Ruths, 
where hospitality was exercised to travellers and strangers. 

(/) Thjs expression alludes to Sobairce having built Dun Sobairce; 
and though Eolus desired to end his days in his tent, after the man- 
ner of all his race before the time of Sobairce, he wished to have it 
understood, that he meant not to find fault with Sobairce, or those 
descended from him, who had done otherways. 

(g) Here we have a demonstration of the difference between the 
airy fancies of the priests, received and cherished by the multitude 
under the name of Religion, and the substantial opinions of ths 
Olam, founded upon all the knowledge attainable by man, rejecting 
every thing as fraud and imposture, for the ends of self- aggrandise- 
ment, that was incompatible with the senses, and at variance with 
-right reason. They did not admit of any partiality in their supreme 
being, or that he selected one or more as depositaries of his will, 
secreted from the rest of his creatures ; they preferred a belief, that 
those who pretended to have communication with the Author of 
life and light were cheats and impostors, more particularly uhen 
the evidence was before their senses continually, that the very indi- 
viduals, and their order and descendants, were to possess riches 



OF ERI. 63 

and influence, in consequence of the reception of laws they called 
divine, of which they were to be the interpreters, as well as autho- 
rised to model, enact, and repeal, from time to time, every altera- 
tion tending to increase their own power. 



CHAP. XIV. 

The reign of Oilliol, a space of seven rings, from 
768 to 761. 

Now the chiefs were together on the mount of UUad, 
and they chose Oilliol, the first-born of Eolus. 

And he sent letters unto Maine, that Oldanmact 
might be relieved from the tribute under which that 
land had been laid by Aongus : and he said unto 
Maine, " Call thou for the writing of Eolus, my great 
father and thine, which the priests, in the days of 
Erbot, did steal away from that chief, and therefrom 
thou wilt find, that no word of tribute was spoken of 
on Magmortiomna. 

" Moreover shall the Gaol ofSciot of Iber unto the 
Danan what they would not bear from Sru, and 
therefore did not our fathers depart from GaelagT 

And Maine was consenting unto the desire of Oil- 
liol, but the priests did prevent Maine, saying, " This 
is a device of the Olam, to make the Danan strong to 
help the sons of Er to rule over Eri? and Maine re- 
peated the words to Oilliol; but they were vain 
words, words of the priests, (a) 

Maine is ruled by the priests in all things. 

Eunda passeth all his days in searching into the 
bowels of the earth, in the mountains at the extremity 
of Eri, that look over the world of waters, (b) 



64 CHRONICLES 

Peace abideth. 

Now Oilliol took delight in the chase; and when 
he had ruled for seven rings he went a hunting, as he 
oft had done afore, to the vale of Cora in Ardlain ; 
and a stone flung from the sling of Solar of the Gaal 
at a wolf, struck the head of Oilliol, and he fell into 
the arms of death on the instant. 

And where he fell there hath his heap been raised. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER XIV. 

(a) This was a calumny of the priests of Gaekn : the conduct of 
Sobairce and Ciermna, and every part of the conduct of the race of 
Er, are proof that they had no intention to exercise any authority 
over any part of Eri t save Ullad ; for surely the policy of cultivating 
the friendship of the Danan and Firgneat, for the purpose of pre- 
serving peace, which we have seen the chiefs of Mumain and of 
'Gaelen ever ready to disturb, could not give a colour to this charge 
of the priests : the fact is, the priests detested the Olam, who de- 
spised the priests and regarded not what they said " theirs were 
vain words, words of the priests." 

(6) The part of the country here spoken of were the mountains 
between the present Bantry Bay and the river Kenmare, wherein 
is found, at this day, abundance of ore of divers Kinds. 



CHAP. XV. 

The reign of Ros the son o/*Eolus, a space of seven 
rings, from 761 to 754. 

ROS the son of Eolus was chosen to reign in Ullad 
And when two rings were complete, Dub died, 

and Trien- was chosen Ard Olam. 

And when three rings were run, Eunda, chief in 

Mumain, died, and Fearard his son was chosen. 



OF ERI. 65 

And when five rings were numbered, Maine died, 
and Roiteasac his brother was chosen chief in Gaelen. 

And when Ros had ruled for the circuits of seven 
rings, he sickened and died. 

The bards and minstrels bewailed Ros. 



CHAP. XVI. 

The reign of Ardfear the son of Eolus, a space of 
eighteen rings, from 754 to 73"6. 

ARDFEAR, the youngest of the sons of Eolus, 
was chosen chief in UllacL 

He abideth in Dun Sobairce, inclining his ear to 
the bards, and the music of the harps; all of TJllad 
save Dun Sobairce, he leaveth unto Cier of the race; 
and Cier assembleth the hunters. 

Thus passed the days of Ardfear, for thirteen 
rings that Cier lived, then did he die; and from that 
day Ardfear lifted not up his head for the five rings 
that he endured : then did he cease, having sat oh 
the seat of the chief for the course of eighteen rings. 



CHAP. XVII. 

The reign o/'Seadna, a space often rings, from 736 

to 726. * 

SEADNA the son of Ardfear was chosen in the 
place of his father ; and when he had ruled for one 
ring Trein died, and Murdac was chosen Ar d Olam. 

VOL. II. P 



6 CHRONICLES 

And ere one other ring was completed, Roiteasac 
died, and Don his first-born was chosen to rule in 
Graelen. 

And when Seadna had ruled for three rings, mes- 
sengers were sent through Ullad. saying, 

" Let the chiefs, and one of three of the Olam, as 
seem good unto them, and all the heads of the 
people, and of the Gaal as may be, meet Seadna on 
the mount of Ullad, what time Baal shall have run 
his course through his house Sgith" 

And when the time came, a great congregation 
was together, and Seadna rose in the midst, and 
said, 

" Seadna s desire hath been to see the men of Ullad 
about him, that he may know them, and that they 
may know one the other ; moreover, that the words 
of Eolus may be repeated in the ears of the children 
of the land, and that they may hear the words of the 
Chronicles of their race, that the deeds of times of 
old may be kept alive in the memories of all. What 
ifMurdac read them ?" 

And 1 Murdac did stand nigh unto the seat of the 
chief, and I did read the writings from the beginning 
unto the end, and joy ran through the assembly, for 
the writings had not ofttimes been read since the days 
of Eolus. 

And Seadna had the boards spread, and the con- 
gregation remained together for three days, in joy and 
gladness. 

And Seadna cherisheth the Olam, entering into 
the booths, hearing and giving lessons of wisdom ; he 
deUghteth in music and the song, and the tale of 



OF ERI 67 

times. Seaana doth excel in the ehase, and 
the management of the horse. 

Now when Seadna had ruled for the circuit of ten 
rings, he did leave Dun Sobairce, with intent to go 
unto Loc Cuatt, on the waters of Foist, and of the 
deep; and Fiaca his son, and Eocaid the son of DoiY, 
chief of Maginis, were with the chief; and they did 
move forth of the waters of Foist, and as they turned 
towards the strength of J5a/, the sea began to heave, 
from the strong breathing of the winds, fill a storm 
arose, and the ship was filled with water; and Seadna 
was covered over therein, and all that were within 
the ship, save Fiaca, and Garth the son of Doil, and 
Lortan one of the shipmen, they escaped to the 
land. 

Thus perished Seadna the son of Ardfear, having 
ruled for the course of ten rings. 



CHAP. XVJII. 

The reign of Seadna the son of Ruidruide the son 
of Eolus, a space of fourteen rings, from 726 to 
712. 

Now the chiefs were called together to say who 
should rule in Ullad, and Seadna the son of Ruid- 
ruide the son of Eolus was chosen : Fiaca the first- 
born of Seadna would not suffer himself to be placed 
on the seat of his father. 

Seadna ruleth the land in truth and justice. 

And when Seadna had ruled for two rings Fearard 

F2 



68 CHRONICLES 

died, and Ceas his son was chosen in Mumain ; he 
ruled that land for six rings then he ceased, and 
Marcad the brother of Fearard was chosen. 

And when Seadna ruled during fourteen rings then 
he did die. 



CHAP. XIX. 

The reign of Fiaca the son of Seadna the son of 
Ardfear, a space of nine rings from 712 to 703. 

Now Seadna was no more, and all the chiefs were 
together on the mount to say who was to rule, and 
all called out as with one voice, " Let Fiaca the son 
of Seadna the son of Ardfear take the seat of his 
father." 

And Fiaca did beseech the chiefs to permit him to 
abide in the tent of his dwelling, that his mind was 
not n't to rule; but chiefs and Gaol con tinned to raise 
their voices, saying, " Let none hut Fiaca rule the 
land ;" and he listened unto them. 

And Fiaca abideth within DunSobairce lamenting 
his father, and oft doth he say unto me, "Afurdac, 
my spirit grieveth that I did suffer myself to be 
placed on the seat of my father : 1 strive to the ut- 
most to justify the love of the people towards me, 
but I do feel that I foil therein." 

And Eocaid his brother silteth for Fiaca on the 
mount, and in the hall within Dun Sobairce for the 
chief. 

And Eocaid doth call together the chiefs, and the 
^ and the heads of the people to the mounts of 



OF ERI. 69 

the congregation, ring after ring ; and the words of 
Eolus and of the chronicles are told in the ears of the 
children of the land. 

And the boards are spread, and the voice of the 
harp, and the tales of other times are heard, but not 
by the ear of Fiaca; alas ! the eye of Fiaca is still 
bent in fancy on the form of his father, lying on the 
earth beneath the waters of the sea, his days and 
nights are passed in solitude* 

And what time Fiaca did rule three rings, Mar- 
cad died, and Noid his son was chosen, to rule in 
Mumain. 

Fiaca mourneth continually, yet doth he charge 
Eocaid his brother, and Eocaid his son, to nourish 
the tire of the spirit of the youth of Ullad. 

And now having ruled for nine rings complete, and 
Eocaid his son being of the age, Fiaca did call him 
to him, and also JNeartan the son of Beirt, Murcad 
being on the bed of sickness ; and Fiaca did pour 
into the ear of Eocaid lessons of wisdom never ex- 
ceeded by any of the wise men of the race. 

And he did send Eocaid his son, and Neartan 
the Otam, under whose eye Eocaid hath been 
brought up, to Diruimcrit, with words unto the 
Olam within the booth there, and not to return for 
full seven days. 

And Fiaca did shut himself up within his cham- 
ber, and he took not of the food with which he was 
served, and he pined away into the arms of death. 

And when it was noised abroad that Fiaca was 
no more, the children of the land flocked together 
to Dun Sobairce. 

And messengers were sent to Druimcrit to tell 



70 CHRONICLES Ofr ERI. 

unto Eocaid of what had happed ; and he did return 
in haste. 

And when the days were fulfilled, the weight of 
Fiaca was borne to the land of Ardtain, and there 
was it laid, wrapped in the mantle of his father, ad 
Fiaca did bid, and there is his heap raised, looking 
Over the deep, according to the words of the chief. 

And I Murdac did raise the death-song ; and it 
was chamited by the bards and matrons, and dam- 
sels, to the sound of the voices of a thousand harps. 

And the mournful tale of Seadna was told by thfe 
bards ; and the melancholy of Fiaca for the loss of 
his father, are they not amongst the writings of the 
bards in t)un Sobairce ? (a) 

The children of the land knew not Fiaca, but I 
Murdac did know him to the inmost ; therefore do I 
bewail him ; excelled he was not, no not by any 
of the race. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER XIX. 

(o) Let me remark here, once for all, that the writings of the Olam 
were of an entirely different tcind from those of the bards. Every 
work called a " History of Ireland" thai has e*er yet been offered 
to the world, has been put together from the materials furnished 
by the bards, of which the works themselves give ample proof. 



of 



PART THE THIRD. 



CHAP. I. 

The reign of Eocaid, Olam Fodla Ardri, a space of 
two score rings t from 703 to 663. 

Now all the chiefs were gathered together on the 
mount of Ullad, and Eocaid the son of Fiaca the 
son of Seadna, was chosen. 

All eyes delight to look upon him, all ears are 
charmed with the sound of his voice. 

What though he was brought up amongst the 
Olam, and heard with attentive ears the lessons of 
wisdom in the words of truth. Yet did he take 
pleasure in the chase, and whilst he stored his mind 
with the treasure of knowledge, he did make strong 
his frame by exercise, and thereby laid up a gather- 
ing of health for times to come. 

In years a youth, in wisdom aged is he : 

At this time died Murdac, and Near tan the son 
of lleirt was chosen Ard Olam of Utlad. 

Now Eocaid took deeply to his heart the dealing 
of Marcac towards Fiaca his father; for Marcac 



72 CHRONICLES 

had said (as told to Eocaid) in the hearing of man 
of the chiefs of Mumain and of Gaelen. 

" Fiaca was the cause of Seadnas death with 
evil mind ;" and the words of Marcac did Noid re- 
peat, and many more words of his own did he add 
thereto. 

Now Eocaid being chosen chief in Ullad, he did 
send letters unto Noid, saying, 

" The words said to be spoken by Marcac thy 
father, and by thee now, concerning Fiaca my father, 
wound my spirit. 

" The words of Marcac had passed, and had been 
forgotten, did not the lips of Noid now recal them. 

" Saidst thou them not? so answer so shall my 
wounds be healed. Saidst thou them ? Declare also 
the cause of thy knowledge, or confess thou hast 
none, and we may live in peace; or answer not, or 
say Noid hath said, Let Noid and Eocaid think 
on everlasting sleep Eocaid and Noid may not 
live." 

And Noid sent letters unto Eocaid by the mes- 
senger of Noid, and these are the words thereof: 

" Shall Mumain speak humbly unto Ullad, and 
sue for pardon of his words? What Noid hath said, 
that hath he said ; and he will speak the words 
again in the hearing of Mumain ; yea, in the hearing 
of Eocaid, even in Ullad." 

And when Eocaid did read the words, he said 
unto the messenger, 

" Say unto Noid, 

" The chief of Ullad will hear the words of Noid 
in the land of Noid." 



OF ERI. 73 

Are not the words on the Chronicles of Ullad in 
Dun Sobairce ? 

And Eocaid called together the assembly, and he 
bad unto me Neartan, 

" Let the words of Marcac aforetime, and now of 
Noid, and the words of Eocaid unto Noid, be re- 
peated aloud." And it was so. 

And the chiefs and the Gaal raised up their hands, 
and swore to take vengeance of Noid for his words, 
so great a host went not forth of Ullad since the 
Gaal first breathed in ErL 

We were all of one mind, was not I myself, even 
J Neartan with the host? 

And the warriors moved towards the south, and 
when we came to the waters of Buidamau, we 
washed ourselves therein. 

And we passed through Gaelen ; the men of that 
land were amazed, they thought not of our coming. 

And we passed over the waters of Sior, and we 
raised our tents on the narrow plain, that runneth 
its length between the hills of S'oir and Star. 

And Eocaid did send a messenger unto the tents 
of Noid, saying, 

" Eocaid stand eth on the land ofMumain, to hear 
tlie words of Noid 9 in the presence of the host of 



And Noid answered, 

" Eocaid dealeth deceitfully; could not the words 
of Noid be more distinctly heard in the calm of 
peace, than in the storm of preparation for the 
battle? The warriors of Mumain are scattered 
through the land." 



74 CHRONICLES 

Now Baal had entered into the second chamber 
of his house Meas. 

And Eocaid answered, 

" Let Baal take his course through Meas, and 
through as many chambers of his house Cruining, as 
will suffice for the gathering together of the men of 
Mumain ; then will Eocaid hear the words of Noid." 

And Eocaid returned to this side of Sior, and 
there did he raise up his tent in the midst of the 
warriors of Ullad ; for he said, " We will pass 
through the waters of the land, even in the presence 
of Noid and the host of Mumain." 



And Noid sent through Mumain to assemble the 
host. 

And when Baal had entered the last chamber of 
his house Cruining, we beheld the warriors of Mu,- 
main pouring from the tops of the mountains into the 
plain. 

And on the next day Noid sent defiance unto 
Eocaid : he thought to have kept the men of Ullad 
from passing over the waters of Sior. 

For it had not been told unto him, that Eocaid 
had stones, great and small, thrown into the shoals 
of the river, for the men of war to pass over. 

And when the men of Mumain saw the men of 
Ullad go through the waters where it was not 
thought upon, they moved backward their faces 
towards us, till they reached the tents of Noid, nigh 
unto Tuamleicmor, beneath which lieth Airt the 
son of Conmaol, there thrown from the back of the 
horse, there fallen to rise no more. 

Now it was mid-day when the warriors stood be- 



OF ERI. 75 

fore each other ; and they did fight till Baal denied 
his light. 

And as Eocaid lay in his tent after the battle, in 
the midst of the warriors, and one third kept watch, 
word was brought unto him that Noid had been killed. 

And Eocaid raised himself on the bed whereon 
he lay, and he said, 

" As the spirit of Noid is quenched, so let the 
fire of the wrath of Eocaid be extinguished for ever." 

And on the morrow Eocaid sent to the chiefs Oi 
Mumain, saying, 

" Sheathed be the sword, let peace abide. Noid was 
chief of the race of Iber, let the people chaunt the 
death-song ; none but a chief shall raise the war-song 
of the chief. 

And the Cruimtear laid the weight of Noid in 
the chamber of ever-during sleep, in the house of 
death ; and the bards, and the matrons, and the 
damsels chanted the death-song; and when the 
harps poured forth their mournful voice, the men or 
Ullad seemed as though every sense had sat within 
their ear, and feasted there, so ravishing the sounds 
of Mumain s harps. () 

And Eocaid raised the war-song : and he told Oi 
Marcac and of Cier, sons of the hero, their hearts 
knitted together in love of Cier, overwhelmed by 
the waves of the sea, and of the youth JEr, in the 
hand of Marcac, as he moved before the host to 
make a circuit of the land, the strides of the warrior 
shortened e'en to the pacing of the lad. 

And the warriors were touched feelingly. 

But when he spoke of Marcac the Hither of Noid, 
and of Noid self, now low, the sons of Marcac, Iber 



76 CHRONICLES 

first-born of the hero, blasting the glory of Fiaca the 
son of Er with the deadly poison of false tongues, 
the warriors wept, and Eocaid wept, and cried. 

And Eocaid tarried in the land of Mumain for 
nine days, and the chiefs of that land were with 
him; and Ceas the brother of Noid came unto Eo- 
caid, and they gave the hand of friendship one to the 
other. 

And we heard the minstrels of Mumain, and Eo- 
caid was charmed with the music of their harp. 

And we did hear the bards relate the tales of 
other times; one would almost fancy they believed 
what they did tell, so aptly are the words suited to 
the tale. 

We were in amazement; and Eocaid said unto 
me, " Near tan, 'twere good the men of Uilad tar- 
ried here not long ; the levity of Mumain is captiva- 
ting, and levity is hurtful to the man of toil." And 
Eocaid did give unto Ceas two beautiful horses, and 
two dogs, for the horses and the dogs of Uliad do 
excel the horses and the dogs of Gaelen and of 
Mumain. 

And we passed over the Soir, and we did keep 
the waters thereof on our right, till we did see the 
waters of Biora; and we did turn our faces to the 
fingers of Baal, till we came to the tents of Maol, 
chief of Ros ; and there Don, chief of Gaelen, did 
tarry, waiting the coming of Eocaid, for Eocaid had 
sent a messenger unto him, to meet him there. 

And Eocaid bad, " Let the warriors move slowly 
towards Ullad;" and Eocaid staid two days after. 

And as Eocaid moved towards Ullad, the princes 
of Er, Ros, and Ardfear, and three chiefs of Ullad, 



OF ERI. 77 

Aod chief of Maginis, Nnolt chief of Ardtain, and 
Conn chief of Jargael, and I Near tun, and a goodly 
company of horsemen, we did view th-e mount of 
Gaelen, 

And on the third day we did raise np our tents 
on Eaden Star; and Eocaid did abide there for three 
days, then we did move towards Dun Sobairce. 

And when the days of one moon had passed, 
Eocaid did send a messenger unto me, saying, 

" Let Near tan stand in Dun Sobairce" 

And I did stand in the presence of the chief, and 
he did disclose unto me the thoughts of his mind ; 
and Ive did call unto him Aod, chief of Maginis; 
and Aod, and I Neartan did abide within Dun 
Sobairce continually, our ears intent on the \vonder- 
ous wisdom of Eocaid, far exceeding the counsel 
he sought of us. 

All his words were of Eri, the glory of the chiefs, 
the happiness of the Gaul. 

And when Baal had entered the threshold of his 
house, Tionnscnad, Eocaid did send Aod chief of 
Maginis, and Naolt chief of Ardtain, with letters 
unto Ceas, who had been chosen to sit in the place 
of Noid his brother in Mumain, and unto Don chief 
in Gaelen, saying unto Ceas: " Eooaid will move 
towards the tents of Maol chief of Ros, in Gae- 
len, with words for the ear of Ceas, the son of 
Marcac" 

And unto 'Don: 

" If Don the son of Roithedsac will come to the 
tents of Maol chief of Ros, Eocaid, king in Ullad, 
will be there with words for the ear of Don." 



76 CHRONICLES 

And Eocaid bad the chiefs, Aod and Naolt, to 
await his coming to the tents of MaoL 

And Eocaid did take his departure from Dun 
Sobairce\ I Neartan in company of the king: and 
we did tarry four days on Eaden Siar ; and Eocaid 
did speak with the Gaol from Leir even unto the 
stream of MagnaMe, till lost in the waters of BU- 
idtiman. 

And we did move towards the tents of Maol, and 
there did Ceas and Don tarry, waiting the coming of 
Eocaid. 

And there also were Aod and Naolt. 

And on the day after the day on which we were to- 
gether, Eocaid did speak unto Ceas and unto Don, 
of his desire that the chiefs of /for should know each 
other ; and that laws should be set down connect- 
edly for the nations of the Gaal'm Eri, and that all 
the rules now in confusion should be placed in order 
for the eye of man for the times to come. 

" What if the sons of Iber and of lolar, and the 
chiefs of Mumain and of Gaelen, should meet the 
sons of Er and the chiefs ofUllad?" 

And he did add moreover: 

"As I did go from hence towards the land ofUllad, 
and now did hither eoine from thence, I did stand 
upon a hill, Eaden Siar it is called ; and as I cast 
my eyes from thence on every side, I did think, and 
I did say unto Neartan : 

" O that the children of the race and all the chiefs 
of the Gaalof Sciotin Eri would gather themselves 
together to this mount, not made by hands of man ; 
and there would utter their preconceived thoughts 



OP ERI. 79 

for the glory of the chiefs and the happiness of the 



" If Don and Ceas would speak." 

And they did consent thereunto. 

And Eocaid said, " What if Ceas and the princes 
of the race of Iber, and all the chiefs of Mumain, 
and Don, and the princes of the race of lolar, and 
all the chiefs of Gaelen, would raise their tents on 
Eaden Siar, what time Baal shall enter into his 
house Cruining, there will they meet Eocaid, and 
the princes of the race of Er, and the "chiefs of 
Ulladr 

And it was so. 

And the chiefs gave the hand of friendship and of 
surety to each other ; and they took their departure 
at the same time from the tents of Maol; and Eo- 
caid, and those with him, returned to Dun Sobairce. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER I. 

(a) It is a singular fact, that the description of the three king- 
doms of Eri, found interpersed through these Chronicles, are just as 
at this day. 

For all the proper names, you are referred to the Map and Glos- 
sary. 



CHAP. II. 

Now messengers were sent out througn Ullad with 
letters, saying, 

" Let the tents of thesons of Er, andof all the chiefs 
of Ullad, stand nigh unto Dun Sobairce, what time 



80 CHRONICLES 

Baal shall touch the threshold of his house Meas, 
the mantle clasped, the sword sheathed in the left 
hand." 

And it was so. 

And Eocaid called all the sons of Er, and all the 
chiefs of Ullad to him in Dun Sobairce, and me 
Neartan did he call unto him also. And he did 
speak unto them of the words passed at the tents 
of Maol, and they were pleasing to the ears of the 
assembly. 

And in nine days Eocaid, and all the race of Er 
of the age, and all the chiefs of Ullad, and I Near- 
tan the son of Ifei'rl, - did take our departure from 
Dun Sobairce, and in twelve days we were on Eaden 
Siar. 

And on the third day Ceas, chief of Mumain, and 
all of the race of Jber, and all the chiefs of Mumain, 
and 1th the son of Lugad, chief of Ib Lugad. 

And Don, chief of Gaelen, and all the race of 
lolar, arid all the chiefs of Gaelen (save Murcad, 
chief of Ard Cloc, he lay on his bed sick), were on 
Eaden Siar. 

And on the four days, Eocaid, and Ceas, and 
Don, did look over the land on every side. 

And what time Baal was within his house Cruin- 
ing, 

Ail the assembly were together on the summit of 
the hill. 

And Eocaid stood up in the midst, and he did 
say 

" Kings of Mumain and Gaelen, princes of the 
race, chiefs of the nations of the Gaal in Eri: 

" According to the words of Eocaid, by the hands 



OF ERI. 81 

of the messengers are we together. Now hearken, 
that ye may understand the cause of the desire or 
his mind, that we should be met even here. 

" When Cealgac did deal deceitfully, did not 
Calma and Ronard take their departure from liter 
of our fathers, that no strife should be? 

" When the children of Feine thought to throw 
chains of slavery over them, did not our fathers 
escape from them? for they were of one mind. 

" Did not Cogarrad, though of the race, lead his 
followers over Beama r tmt no seeds of hatred should 
be scattered over the land of Gaelag? 

" For the circuit of four hundred and fourscore 
and four rings that our fathers sojourned in that land, 
did the nations of Eisfeine and the chiefs of Aoimag 
prevail against the children of Iber, their force as the 
force of one man ? 

" When Sruamac spread the waves of devastation 
over Gaelag, what power could stop them ? Golam 
the victorious, and all the host availed nought. 

" Could they stand up against pestilence, and 
drought, and famine? Did they fall, no fault was 
theirs ; these are of necessity. Those who survived 
the havoc, were they not of one mind, preferring 
every danger, yea", death itself, to the risk of the loss 
of their darling liberty. 

" And, therefore, did they preserve the treasure; 
c.nd hither did bear it through all the perils of the 
raging seas. And even here, did not the host made 
few and thin by Srumac, sorely reduced from one 
cause and another, plant and take root by help of 
such a hand as even Cegail the Firgneat could lend, 

VOL. II. G 



82 CHRONICLES 

in despite of the rude blasts of the bold and angry 
Danan ? 

" What though the Gaol were as one for all the 
rings counted from the days of Ardfear even unto 
Golam, two rings only had been complete in Eri till 
strife arose: the sun blushed, the moon grew pale, 
the stars did wink in shame, affright, and sorrow, 
for the foul deeds of Eri s sons. 

" Instances Eocaid must not rest upon ; let the 
bare mention now suffice to prevent the like for times 
to come. 

" The sons of Golam know not each the other : 
the nations of Eri have become as strangers, the 
chiefs of the Gaol as foes ; their voices sounding in 
discord one to the other. 

" On these things hath Eocaid deeply thought, 
and on the means for staying them. 

" Therefore, what if the kings of the nations in 
Eri, and all of the race of the hero, and all the 
chiefs of the Gaol of Sciot of Iber, should meet, 
and that they would chuse one from amongst them 
to sit e'en one step higher than his fellows, and all 
should consent to laws to be set down for the eye, 
and the direction of the whole to be holden talk 
upon? 

" And as this hill doth stand so aptly for the end, 
inviting us by his kindly aspect to so fair a work of 
love and harmony, 

" What if the Gaol, from the hill of Leir to the 
fountain of Magnailbes streams, and as they move 
till mingled with the waters of the Buidaman, and 
as the Buidaman doth glide to where one, stand- 



OF ERI, 83 

ing on the head of Leir, can see the Highest land 
thereto 

" What if the Gaal thereon were entreated to 
move to Mumain, to Gaelen, and to Ullad, and tp 
dwell thereon according to portions dealt out with 
no sparing hand : thanks for their accord. 

" And all the land now spoken of rest with the 
chief of Eri, reward for his care, yielded to his some- 
what, though so little, height above his brethren &f 
the race." 

And Eocaid added moreover : 

4< Jf Ceas and Don would speak." 

And Ceas stood up and said, " The words of Eo- 
caid are pleasing in the ear of Ceas" 

And Don did stand up, and he did say, " The 
words of Eocaid are good." 

And Eocaid said, " What think the race and the 
chiefs of the Gaal? If they would tell their thoughts." 

And all said, " it is well," 

And the boards were spread, and there was feast- 
ing, and mirth, and great joy, that the qhiefs in Eri 
were drawn towards each other. 

And the day before the chiefs did separate, 
Ceas and Don did entreat Eocaid to perfect the 
work he had begun, and that three of the chiefs of 
Mumain, and three of the chiefs of Gaelen, would 
abide with him on Eaden Siar, to look into the con- 
ditions of the Gaal to be removed from round abpujt 
Eaden Star, that their portions may be assigned to 
them through the nations of Eri. 

And it was so. 

And Eocaid, and three chiefs of Mumain, and 
three chiefs of Ullad, and three chiefs of Gaelen, 

G 2 



84 CHRONICLES 

did abide on the hill, and all save those did move 
towards the tents of their dwellings. 

And Eocaid did toil without ceasing, and he bad 
that words should be spoken to the Gaol " Repose 
within your homes, till it shall be convenient that 
ye remove ; yea, think not of taking your departure 
till in gathering pass in the ring that is to come." 

And the words did gladden the hearts of the 
Gaal. 

And Eocaid did not move towards Dun Sobaircc, 
till Baal had entered into his house Slat. 

And joy ran through Ullad, for that Eocaid did 
abide thereon. 

And he did call chiefs and Olam, and heads of the 
people about him ; and he did make inquiry from 
them, of all things fitting for him to know. 

And when Baal had entered into his house Sgith, 
messengers went forth through Ullad, with words, 
saying, " Let the princes of the race, and the chiefs 
of the Gaal, meet Eocaid on the mount of Ullad, 
what time Baal shall enter into his house Meas" 

And when the time came, and the assembly were 
together on the -mount, 

Eocaid rose from his seat : 

And he did repeat unto all the account of what 
had been done ; and he added moreover 

" It is the desire of my mind to make known 
laws for Ullad, shaped ; but that Eri should take 
place of Ullad, as is fitting to be done ; therefore 
doth he defer the mention of them. 

" This is not a .business of haste ; it would not be 
jrood that words put on the roll should be of no 
effect, or to be blotted out therefrom. Therefore 



OF ERI. 85 

the messengers cannot go forth through the nations 
of the Gaal in Eri, till this ring shall be completed 
at the soonest. 

" And to the end that the work now in hand should 
be durable, and spoken of in times to come, our 
fame borne on the lips of all that shall utter them, 
what if the chiefs, and Olam, and heads of the peo- 
ple in Ullad, did think upon those things that would 
insure the harmony of the nations of Eri, and the 
happiness of the GaalT* 

And Eocaid said, " The day is now spent ; this 
night let the tales of other times be heard from the 
lips of the bards, and sweet music from the harps 
of the minstrels. 

" And on the morrow the Olam will repeat unto 
us the writings of Eolus, and the words of the chro- 
nicles." 

And it was so. 

And the assembly took their departure to the 
tents of their abidings. 

And Eocaid ceaseth not from toil : he goeth forth 
alone: he heareth the words of men and gaineth 
knowledge of all sorts of things : he doth commune 
with me Neartan; he enricheth my mind from the 
store of his amazing wisdom. 

Now Baal had entered his house Blat. and mes- 
sengers went forth through Eri, saying, 

" Let the kings of the nations of Eri, and the 
princes and the chiefs of the Gaal, be together on 
the hill of Eaden Siar, what time Baal shall enter 
the threshold of his house larsgith." 

And Eocaid, and the race, and the chiefs oCUllad, 
and three of the Olam, one from, each of the schools* 



86 CHRONICLES 

and I Neartan did move towards the south, what 
time Baal had passed through three chambers of 
the blessed fire. 

And Eocaid did see the Gaol who were to re- 
move; and they did all desire to raise up their tents 
on the lands of Ullad; but Eocaid restrained them. 
And when I Near tan did inquire the cause therefore, 
he did answer unto me, 

" The priests of Gaelen, and the bards of Mumain, 
may raise jealousy in the minds of Don and Ceas, 
that would burn up the knitting fruit, but now put 
forth from the blossom of the hope of Eocaid." 

And I did hold my peace. 

And now the chiefs of Eri and the chiefs of the 
Gaal were gathered together on Eaden Star. 

And the boards were spread, and there was feast- 
ing and sports for three days : and on the fourth 
day, when all stood together on the summit of the 
hill, Eocaid rose up, and he did say : 

" Words were spoken heretofore by me, and they 
were pleasing in the ears of Ceas and Don, and of 
the princes, and of all the chiefs of the Gaal of Eri, 
for so they did declare. 

" What if one of the race did sit even one step 
higher than his fellows to watch over Eri ? 

" Doth the same mind abide even now ?" 

And all said, " Yea." 

And as Eocaid was about to speak, 

Ceas stood up, and said, 

" What if Eocaid the son of Fiaca the son of Se- 
adna, of the race of Er^ son of the hero, do sit on 
the seat of the chief of Eri f 

And all said, " Yea." 



OF ERI. &7 

And Eocaid said, " The desire of the mind of 
Eocaid is to justify the judgment of his brethren 
concerning him : what his thoughts are may not 
now be disclosed ; better be late, yea, not be, than 
ready to evil. 

" The Gaal abide yet on the portion of the chief; 
what if forms and substances were delayed to be 
established, till Eocaid shall be prepared to lay 
before the assembly of Eri the things that are to 
stand or fall to nought according to their words." 

And he added moreover, 

" What time Baal shall enter his house larsgith 
in the ring that is next to be completed, messengers 
shall go forth through the nations of Eri, who shall 
bear the tidings of our gathering ourselves together, 
even here ; and in the time between, let all think of 
what is best to be done." 

And it was so. 

And the assembly did remain together for nine 
days, in exceeding mirth and gladness. 

And Eocaid did not move towards Ullad, he 
abided in his tent on Eaden Star. 

Note. The words of the chronicles are so clear, they stand not in 
need of explanation. 



CHAP. III. 

The Tale of Liz fail (a) 

Now it happed upon a day as Eocaid did commune 
with Near tan , 

That lonar, Ard Cruimtear of Gaelen, did come 
unto the tent of Eocaid, and he did say, 






88 CHRONICLES 

" As I did rise, three mornings now are passed, 
from the arms of the image of death, and had puri- 
fied my head, my feet, my hands, and my heart in 
the presence of Baal, 

" And forth had walked to refresh my spirit ; lo, 
three young men drew nigh unto me, and one said, 

" If I seeArd Cruimtear, 'twere good he knew we 
have tidings for the ear of the chief of En, fit to be 
toJd and heard. 

" And I did return unto Asti, nigh unto the mount 
of Gaelen, with the young men, and I did inquire of 
them, what manner of thing it was the chief should 
know. 

" And Saor, one of the youths, did stand up be- 
fore me, and he did tell, 

" We be of the Gaol, of Sciot of Her, and have 
hither come with words for the ear of the chief, a 
son of Cier, as we hear, whose heap is raised on the 
rocks of the terrible sea, behind the utmost limits 
of our land; and hither have we come to tell. 

" Our fathers of old time did leave the land of 
Iber with Cathac one of the race, and his mind was 
to be chief. And when the chiefs of Iber would not 
have it so, Cathac did call unto him a company of 
young men, and they did provide a ship upon the 
gathering together of all the waters behind the land. 

" And before the day that he who was to be cho- 
sen king was named, Cathac and the young men 
were together. 

" Now long and long before this time, one whose 
name we never heard was to be called chief; and the 
night before the day he was to come forth into the 
presence of the Gaal, 



OF ERI. 89 

" A mighty stone, white as snow, round as the 
head of man, smooth as the arrow for the warrior's 
bow, was borne in a chest drawn by many beasts, 
the priests surrounding the way they moved. 

" And the priests said, how Baal had sent the 
blessed stone even from the bosom of the mountains 
that rear their mighty heads above the plains, thus 
formed by his own hand, white and round, and 
smooth, to show unto the chief, e'en what he ought 
to be. 

" And mighty Baal forth did send his terrible 
voice, saying, Let all the race for evermore receive 
the name of chief on Liafail, (for so they called the 
stone) from the mouth of the high-priest, the servant 
of Baal on earth. 

" And thus were four chiefs named. 

" Now before the day the chief who crossed the 
way Cathac desired to move was to come forth and 
take his seat on Liafail, lo, Cathac and the young 
men did bear away the blessed stone to the ship 
that floated on the waters behind the land of lber> 
and thereon they had much store ; 

" For being but few to journey on the land, they 
would move on the face of the waters in search of 
their brethren, led by two of the race, to the extre- 
mity of the world of land to the sun's going, as they 
had heard. 

" And they were driven from their course. 

" These words have we heard ; it is but a tale of 
other times long passed, told from mouth to ear ; it 
is but breath: what hath been said fit for the chief 
to hear remains. 

" We are of Ton, companion of Cathac, our fa- 



90 CHRONICLES 

thers told, the vessel was borne to this land, and 
here was broken, but all the men came safe with 
Liafail ; and Firgneat did lead our fathers to their 
caves, and when they came to understand the words 
concerning Liafail, 

" Chiefs of Iber } Goal of Sciot, look on this stone, 
So smooth, so fair, so round, and so compact. 
Be thus ; guard well this blessed gift, 
And in what land this messenger shall stay 
A chief of Iber shall still bear the sway," 

" Firgneat would not suffer him to abide with us ; 
and when the Danan came to hear the words, they 
did bear away our Liafail from them. 

" And Liafail is now in Oldanmact, and called 
Stanclidden : the Danan cast their lots beneath him, 
as we hear. 

" Thither send, O king ! and have the name of 
chief on Liafail from the priest's mouth ; so will the 
land remain to a son of Her and the Gaol of Sciot 
for evermore." 

And Eocaid said, let me see the youths. 

And Saor repeated his tale ; and Eocaid inquired 
of the young men if they did ever hear, what time 
these things did hap? But they had no note, only 
that the Danan then were not upon this land. 

And the youths did speak most part in the tongue 
of the Gaol of Sciot, though not throughout. 

And they do dwell on the hills and in the vales 
that touch the waves of the world of waters, and of 
the sea of Iber unto the waters that do spread them- 
selves upon the land, as thou goest towards the fin- 
gers of 



OF ERI. 91 

And Eocaid did send Saor, and a company of 
gallant youths, to Meirt chief of Oldanmact, with 
a present of four horses, and a piece of fine cloth, 
and a request to give Stanclidden unto Saor ; Stan- 
clidden which is Liafail. 

And Meirt did commune with those about him, 
and they were of a mind to consent unto the desire 
of the son of Er. 

And Eocaid had sent a car for Liafail, and he 
was placed thereon, and Saor and the young men 
returned with him unto Eocaid. 

And when the day came for seating Eocaid, and 
all the assembly were on the mount, and a mighty 
congregation of the children of the land were round 
about, what time Baal had touched larsgith, 

And the heralds proclaimed aloud, 

" Let Eocaid the son of Fiaca the son of Seadna 
the son of Ardfear the son of Eolus, of the race of 
Er, son of the hero, sit .Erimionn" 

When the air had ceased to tremble for the shouts 
of joy, 

Eocaid said, " Let Saor of the Gaal of Sciot of 
Iber be called." 

And he was raised upon the shields of the tallest 
of the warriors, and Saor did repeat the tale of Lia- 
fail, and when he had made end, 

Eocaid did speak unto the heralds, and they did 
say aloud> 

" The desire of Eocaid is towards Liafail" 

Thus spake the heralds ; but the Cruimtear and 
the Carneac held their peace ; they remembered of 
Luban and Cromcruad, as the days of Tighernmas. 

But when it did seem good in the eyes of the 



92 CHRONICLES 

people, and all the chiefs were consenting unto it, 
lonar stood up, and he did say, 

" Is it the will of the congregation that Erimionn 
receive the asion and mantle on Liafail?" 

And all shouted, " Yea." 

And Eocaid was seated on Liafail, and the Ard 
Cruimtear of Gaelen placed the asion on the head, 
and the mantle laid he on the shoulders of Eocaid. 

And the Ard Criumtear and all the priests turned 
their eyes towards Baal, and bowed the head, 

And all the assembly turned their faces toward 
Eocaid, and clapped their hands and shouted. 

And when silence abided, Erimionn did speak 
again unto the heralds, 

And they did say aloud, 

" From this <day forth, for evermore, what if this 
mount be called, 

"The hill of TOBRAD?"(&) 

And all said, " Yea." 

And the tale of Liafail, and all the acts of the 
day whereon Eocaid was proclaimed Erimionn, are 
taken down as Eocaid did bid unto me Neartan 
the son of Beirt, Ard Olam of Ullad, to remain with 
the words of the chronicles for ever. 

And there was feasting and sports for one whole 
moon, and the song and music, and the dance, and 
tales of other times. 

And at the end of one moon, even the moon lar- 
sgith, when all the assembly of Eri were together 
on the mount, 

Erimionn rose, and said, 

" The full mind of Eocaid is not formed even 
yet ; in the ring that is to be completed after that 



OF ERI. 93 

-which now is, he will be prepared with words for 
the ears of the chiefs, and Gaal of Eri, if the chiefs 
of the race and of the Gaal will suffer him to take 
his course." 

And all said, " Yea." 

And Erimionn said, " Neartan, Ard Olam of Ul- 
lad hath a feast for the ears of the assembly." 

And I did stand up, and I did read the writings 
of Eulus and of Eteerial, and the words of the 
chronicles of G-aelag and of Eri, to the day on 
which I spoke. 

And what time Baal entered into the second 
chamber of his house Cruining, the assembly re- 
turned to the tents of their dwellings. 

And Erimionn gave a charge unto Ros, a chief of 
the race, to have an eye of care for Ullad. 

And Eocaid dwelleth on Tobrad; he went not 
unto 'Dun Sobairce. 

And he had timber hewed down, and he had an 
house durable builded up on the summit of the hill 
of Tobrad, and chambers added he thereto of tim- 
ber framed together; and timbers were laid upon 
those fixed, and covered with rushes and branches, 
and the house and the chambers were finished ere 
Baal had taken his departure from his house Dei- 
rionac. (c) 

And Erimionn did send a messenger unto Ard- 
fear, of the race of Er, to come unto him. 

And when Ardfear was on Tobrad, I Neartan in 
the presence of Eocaid and Ardfear, Eocaid did 
say, 

" Go, Ardfear, with words to Ceas and Don, arid 
say unto them, Eocaid would that three of the 



94 CHRONICLES 

Olam, and nine of the heads of the people, were 
chosen in each of the nations of Eri by their fellows, 
that they may hear and be consenting unto the laws 
to be spoken of for the children of the land, and 
that they may be known ere Baal entereth larsgith" 

And Ardfeqr did go, and he did return with 
words, " As Erimionn hath spoken, Cea$ and Don 
will do according thereunto." 

And the Ard Cruimtear of Gaelen did come unto 
Erimionn, and he did remind him of the nine laws of 
Baal to the nine Cruimtear from the beginning ; and 
be did raise his voice, and he did say, 

" Son of Er, touch not the laws of Baal;" and he 
did speak as having authority. 

And Eocaid smiled, and said, " The thoughts 01 
Erimionn are on Eri, so downward are they bent 
thereto, fancy hath not leisure for the air. Prithee 
Cruimtear, hold thy peace, till counsel be required 
of thee." 

And lonar spake again, and said, 

" Will Erimionn destroy the laws of Baal?" 

And Eocaid opened his mouth, wherefrorn did 
flow wisdom, as the stream from a pure fountain; at 
length he said, 

" Is the knowledge of Ard Cruimtear no greater 
than it seemeth ? Is it in the power of man to alter 
the unchangeable? The laws of Baal are beyond the 
reach of man. 

" When man can mount unto the air as doth the 

bird : 

" When he can dive unto the bottom of the deep, 
and sport amidst the waters, as the fish : 



OF ERI. 95 

" When he can burrow in the earth, and there 
abide e'en as the worm doth : 

" When he can endure the burning flame, to dwell 
therein : 

" When he can retain his food, or sustenance re- 
ject, and live : Then can he set aside the laws of the 
Almighty." 

Nay, Ard Cruimtear Eocaid can not touch the 
laws of Baal. But he will touch, and strike, and 
down will beat pernicious laws of man, speaking 
with false tongues in the name of the Most High. 

And lonar turned to vspeak, when Erimionn said 
unto him tenderly, 

" What availeth it to speak of things whereon no 
man can decide." 

And lonar went his way angrily. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER III. 

(a) Liafail means the stone of destiny t on which many chief kings 
of Eri were crowned, till the time of Feargus, who led a colony to 
present Scotland, 503 years since Christ, at which time he requested 
permission to take the stone to that land, to secure the establish* 
ment of his race therein ; which request was complied with, and 
many of the Scottish chiefs of Caledonia-were inaugurated on Liafail, 
which it is generally supposed was laid hold on, and brought away 
from Scone to London, where, in Westminster Abbey, a stone is 
shown for Liafail, by the name of Jacob's pillow; but that Edward 
of England did not take off the real stone is evident from a view of it, 
and the perusal of these chronicles; Jacob's pillow being in nothing 
like Liafail, save in its being a stone. 

(6) Tobrad means election; it is now corrupted to Tara. 

(c) This building was called Teacmor, the great house ; called by 
M'Pherson Temora, to please the English ear. 



96 CHRONICLES 



CHAP. IV. 

Now Baal had entered the threshold of his house 
larsgith, freshly, 

When Eocaid sent forth messengers with letters, 
saying, 

" Let the kings, princes, and nobles of the Gaal 
in Eri, and chiefs of the Olam, and heads of the 
people, meet Erimionn in the high chamber of Teac- 
mor, on Tobrad, what time the fires shall be lighted 
on the summits of the plains of Eri. 

And now as Baal was moving into Fluicim, the 
fires blazing on the summits of the land, the glory 
of Eri shined on Tobrad. 

And all the heralds raised their voices aloud, and 
the gates of the high chamber of Teacmor opened, 
and Erimonn, and the kings of Mumain and Gaelen, 
arid the princes and nobles and the chiefs of the 
Olam, and heads of the people of the nations of the 
Gaal of Eri entered. 

And the throne was set in the middle of the cham- 
ber, one step higher than the floor thereof. 

And a table stood on the floor beneath the throne, 
and the king of Mumain, of the race of Iber, took 
his seat opposite to the table, on the right side of 
the throne. 

And the king of Gaelen, of the race of lolar, took 
his seat opposite to the table, his face towards the 
throne. 

And the seat of the king of Ullad of the race of 
Er, opposite to the table on the left side of the 



OF ERI. 



97 



throne was empty. Did not the king of Ullad sit on 
the throne Erwrionn ? 

And the chief secretary of Eri sat between the 
throne and the table, close thereunto : 

And the chief secretary of Mumain sat between 
the king of Mumain and the table. 

And the chief secretary of Gaelen sat between the 
king of Gaelen and the table. 

And the chief secretary of Ullad sat between the 
seat of the king of Ullad and the table. 

And the princes of the race of Iber, the first-born 
of the hero, and the princes of Ith y sat on the right 
and left of the king of Mumain. 

And the princes of the race of lolar, sat on the 
right and left of the king of Gaelen. 

And the princes of the race of Er sat on the 
right and left of the seat of the king of Ullad. 

And the nobles sat behind the princes of the na- 
tion, to which they belonged. 

And the Olam, and the heads of the people, sat 
behind the nobles of their lands. 

And on the table in the midst were the rolls of 
other times closed, and the writings of Eolus, and 
the chronicles of the Gaol. 

And rolls open to receive the words of the days 
as they pass, for the eye of the children of the land 
that are to come. 

And as Erimionn rose from the throne, and was 
about to speak, an uproar was raised about Teac- 
mor, and it was told within, that men armed stood 
on Tobrad. 

And Eocaid loosed the girdle, and opened the 
clasp of his mantle, and he said, 

VOL. II. H 



98 CHRONICLES 

" When the laws of Eri are the theme, let the 
sword remain in his scabbard, the bow in his case, 
and Cran Tubai] be hung up in the tents of the Gaal. 

" Reason is the parent of Justice; Justice is the 
handmaid of the laws; arms are instruments of the 
passions of man, 

" Behold Erimtonn beareth not the sword in the 
habitation of the laws. 

" Heralds, say without 

' " Let those who are armed depart every man to 
his tent ; and those who stand on Tobrad abide in 
peace." 

And it was so. 

And Erimionn rose again, and he said, 

" Four rings have been completed since Eocaid 
the son of Fiaca hath been chosen to sit on the 
seat of the chief in Ullad\ since which time the kings, 
the princes of the race, and chiefs of the Gaal, have 
placed him even here, the tie and knot of the cinc- 
ture that is to bind together the affections of all the 
children of the land ; 

"That he may do somewhat to justify their thoughts 
of him, he hath laboured without ceasing to give the 
laws a form, and strength moreover to protect the 
children of Eri from violence and oppression. 

" It is known unto you, that the Cruimtear have 
feigned nine laws from Baal. 

" The foundation laid in deceit, the work hath 
been raised by imposture, and propped up by igno- 
rance on this side, and by fear on that side thereof. 

" When 1 have inquired of the priests that now 
be, for the ground of the fancy of some, of the artifice 
of others, the answer of one and of all hath been 

" The many of the race are poor, they are igno- 



OF ERI. 99 

rant, their ways are perverse ; they have the desire 
of all men, to live at ease, and passions exciting them 
to avarice, yea, and to the possession of power. 

" If they be not controlled by laws other than 
the work of their fellow man, those who have riches 
and dominion will hold both doubtfully. Where 
ignorance prevaileth, fear alone inspireth awe and 
respect. 

" Will the kings, and princes, and nobles, surren- 
der their flocks, and herds, and masterdom, to the 
multitude ? 

" Is it not wiser and better far, that the king re- 
verence the priests ? so may the servants of Baal 
keep the minds of the Gaal in obedience to the king. 

" Then will the king enjoy in peace his large au- 
thority, and the priest his small portion of the land. 

" Such and such like hath been the saying of the 
priests. 

" When | have inquired of them, What if the 
pains taken by the priests to make men ignorant, 
and to keep their minds in the ways of falsehood, 
were bestowed by the Olam to instruct them in the 
lessons of wisdom, in the words of truth? 

" Still hath the answer of the priests beenrrr- 

" Let the Olam speak unto the poor ; and all their 
lessons of knowledge and of wisdom will but create 
in their minds a hunger for riches, a thirst for domi- 
nion, not to be allayed nor quenched till satisfied in 
both. 

"So saith the Cruimtear ; nevertheless my opi- 
nion differeth from the fancy or the artifice of the 
priest : 

" Therefore, 

H 2 



100 CHRONICLES 

" What if five of the laws of the olden time only 
be retained to stand on the roll, at the head of the 
laws of JSri, not deceitfully, as commands from 
Baal, according to the words of the priests, but 
openly, laws of the land, by consent of all the chil- 
dren thereof? 

" J3aal spake not to Astor. 

" It is the voice of Reason that crieth aloud, 

. <; LET NOT MAN SLAY HIS FELLOW. 

" Baal spake not to Lamas. 
" It is Justice that directeth, 

" LET NOT MAN TAKE OF THE BELONGINGS OF ANO- 
THER PRIVATELY. 

" Baal held not converse with Soth. 
" It is the spirit of Truth that saith, 

" LET NOT THE LIPS UTTER WHAT THE MIND 
KNOWETH TO BE FALSE. 

" Baal opened not his mouth to AL 
" It is the gentle voice of tender Pity that whis- 
pereth, 

" MAN, BE MERCIFUL. 

" Baal talked not with Sear. 

" It is the tongue of Wisdom that teacheth, 

" LET MAN DO EVEN AS HE WOULD BE DONE BY. 

" What if these five laws stand laws of Eri ? n 

And all said, " Yea." 

And Erimionn raised his voice, and said, 

"When we were together aforetime, I did say unto 
the assembly then 

" The desire of the mind of Eocaid is towards 
ueace, and the laws of peace continually : 

" True; we have laws from our fathers, the work 
of the chiefs ; therefore they restrain not their pas- 
sions, no punishment following their transgressions. 



OF ERI. 101 

" Fences there are round about the Gaal on every 
side; the Gaal respect them through fear, nothing 
from love. 

" Moreover, the words of the laws from the mouths 
of our great fathers to the ears of our fathers, and so 
to us, are loosed and made fast, as the justicer 
pleaseth, without the consent of the Cluastig. 

" Whilst the words are guarded as though they 
were the property of the judge, and by whom set 
forth no one can render account 

" Therefore, that the laws should be made sure 
to curb violence, and to punish the doer of wrong, 
be he chief, be he of the Gaal, and that the jus- 
ticers also be brought within the rule of number and 
authority ; 

" What if the number of the justicers in each of 
the nations of the Gaal in Eri be twice nine jus- 
ticers ; one in the land of each Tanaisteas, and one 
chief judge to abide nigh unto the king in each of 
the nations, and one other justicer moreover to sit 
nigh unto this TeacmorT 

And all said, " Yea." 

And Erimionn said, 

" It is known unto us, that heretofore the jus- 
ticers have taken on them to hear and to determine, 
the Cluastig not called ; 

" What if the justicer be silent, till the Cluastig 
say aloud, Yea, or Nay ; and if nine Cluastig 
be present, they do all say Yea, or they do all say 
Nay. 

" And if twice nine, or more, do stand round 
about the seat of the justicer, the thing inquired of 
shall be as the greater number shall say. 



102 CHRONICLES 

" And the justicer open not his lips till the hands 
be counted ; then the justicer shall spread out the 
roll of the laws, and he shall say aloud, in the hear- 
ing of all the Cluastig, and of him complained against, 
the words thereon." 

And all said, " Yea." 

And Erimionn said, 

" If the Cluastig say, The man did slay his fellow 
with evil mind, 

" What if the judge read aloud, 

" Let the slayer of man be swept alive out of 
sight into the bowels of the earth, no trace of him 
remaining." 

And all said, " Yea." 

And Erimionn said, 

" If one hath declared other than the truth before 
the justicer and the Cluastig, and the falsehood be 
made manifest, 

" Let the false one suffer in like sort, as by his 
words another had been troubled ; and so in all cases 
whatsoever." 

And all said, ' Yea." 

And Erimionn said, 

" If one taketh by stealth ought of another, and 
the taking be proved, 

" Let the evil-doer restore two-fold, and be put 
to shame in the sight of the children of the land ; 
and if the transgressor cannot restore, the clan 
make good the loss, and the evil-doer bear his own 
shame." 

And all said, " Yea." 

And Eocai&> still standing, raised his voice, and 
said, 



OF EIM. 103 

" What if words be set down on the roll of the 
laws? 

" Let not the Gaal of Sciot of Iber go forth of 
Eri to waste the lands of others : and should the 
Gaal of strange nations enter the land of the children 
of Iber to vex them, let the warriors be of one mind, 
and as one arm, to drive the foreigner into the sea, 
or give them graves in Eri, unless they become sub- 
jected." 

And all shouted " JEW," nine times. 

And Erimionn said, 

" Eri is the birth-right of all the children of the 
land ; the king hath his portion, the prince, the nobles, 
each hath his portion thereof; the Olam, the priests, 
the bards, and the minstrels have their portions. 

" And the Gaal by their clan have their portions 
thereof. 

" From the earth man deriveth sustenance where- 
by to live. Hath any increased his store of cattle, 
or of stuff, or of arms ? Let his words as to these, 
and these like, stand ; of his portion of the land none 
can have dominion longer than he doth abide thereon t 
the children of his loins, and the mother of the chil- 
dren shall dwell thereon, till partition made; then 
let not the woman who bore, nor the damsels who 
are to bring forth, be forgotten ; are not all the race 
born of woman ? 

" Sons of Eri, honour and respect thy father, 

" Love, honour, and respect, and tenderly cherish 
all the days of thy life the mother who bofe, and 
suckled, and reared thee up. Let thy hands minis- 
ter unto her in all her necessities ; let thy eye never 



104 CHRONICLES 

look upon thy mother but in thanks and gentleness. 

" Sons of Eri, 

" Let the strength of thy arms protect the weak- 
ness of the daughters of the land, 

" What if Eri lay under the rules of Tainistact, 
as aforetime ?" 

And it was so. 

And Erimionn said, 

" What if words be set down as laws of the Gaol 
in Eri, according to your will now expressed ?" 

And all said, " Yea." 

Whereupon Eocaid said, 

" The chief desire of Eocaid is yet to be made 
known. The children of the race since our fathers 
first touched this land have been strangers one to 
the other, nay worse when, till now, have they come 
together, but in strife and enmity? 

" When Don and Ceas, chiefs of the race of Iber 
and of lolar, did say unto me, ' Eocaid the son of 
Er, perfect, we pray thee, the work thou hast taken 
in hand ;' from that time, even unto this, have I ap- 
plied my mind thereunto, and I have thought, 

" That if all the kings, and princes, and nobles, 
and chiefs of the Olam, and heads of the people 
should come together to the high chamber of Teac- 
mor in Tobrad, even to this place, at what times the 
fires shall be seen on the summits of the plains, in 
every ring, after three rings shall be completed ; 

" And that the assembly shall hear and shall de- 
cide all controversies of the nations; so shall reason 
take place of passion, and harmony succeed to dis- 
cord. The kingdoms ofMumain, and of Ullad, and 



OF ERI. 105 

of Gaelen remaining perfect, the assemblies willing 
fox themselves as to themselves, as herefore. 

" Each here is equal, free for his words ; he who 
first riseth let him speak unto the end, and when all 
who will speak what his mind had thought upon 
have said, let the right hands be counted, and let 
them be of avail." 

And all said, "Yea." 

And Eocaid said, " Of one thing more let my 
words be heard. 

" When the sons of Golam first did hither come, 
and win this land, it was divided into portions, the 
Danan keeping Oldanmact, according to the cove- 
nant of Magmortiomna, as aforetime; and lands 
were assigned to the Cegail Firgneat, on the borders 
of the waters of the land, between Ullad and Ol- 
danmact. 

" Marcac moved to Deas ; and there also, on the 
waters of the vast sea, Lugad the son of Itli abided. 
lolar raised his tents in the middle of the land. 

" And in the northern portion was Er the son of 
Cier seated by the affections of the nobles and of 
the Gaal; howbeit Amergein the priest devised other 
things. 

" Two rings were but completed, when Marcac 
fell on Ceseol; there was his name invoked, calling him 
Iber, the strength of Golam. Then did lolar take 
upon him to rule all the nations, the children of 
Iber and the son of Cier not of the age, calling him- 
self ERIMIONN. 

" Since which day the sons of lolar are called of 
Erimionn, lolar no longer spoken of. 

" Two Erimionn there cannot be ; 



106 CHRONICLES 

* Therefore, what if he that shall be seated on 
this seat, by the voice of the kings, princes, and 
nobles of the land shall be called for all the time 
that is to come 

ARDRI." 

And all said " Yea." 

And Ardri said, 

" Eocaid hath now disclosed all his thoughts: as 
occasion maketh necessary, laws can be added by 
us, and by those hereafter." 

And the assembly went forth of the high cham- 
ber, and the boards were spread, and the feast was 
served, and all were rejoiced for three days; 

And on the fourth day, 

When the assembly was together in the high 
chamber, 

Ardri rose, and said, 

" The words of the laws of JEW, and the custom 
of Tainistact are set down on the rolls, and now 
abide on the table of the high chamber of Teacmor. 

" What if the words be read ? ' 

And all said, Yea." 

And the chief secretary of Eri read aloud, 

" O man, shed not the blood of thy kind mali- 
ciously. 

" Take not thou aught belonging to another, co- 
vertly. 

" Let not thy lips speak falsely to the injury of 
another. 

" Have mercy on every living being; be merciful. 

'* Do thou unto others as you would wish others 
would do unto thee. This is just and proper. 

" Shall one kill another treacherously, let him be 



OF ERI. 107 

dragged on the ground and cast beneath the surface 
of the earth without memorial. 

" Shall one take privately the property of another, 
let him pay Eric twice the value of the thing taken, 
and set apart. Is he not able to pay, hath he ab- 
sconded from the land of his dwelling, let the family 
pay, but let the transgressor bear his own shame. 

" Shall one have spoken falsely of another, let the 
false one suffer in the like manner as he designed 
against the other, and let the like be observed in all 
cases for ever. 

" Let not the Gaal of Sciot of Iber go forth of 
Eri to trouble another land, and if another race 
shall enter the land of the children of Iber, to op- 
press them without cause, let the warriors be of one 
mind, and as one arm to drive them into the sea, or 
give them graves in Eri, unless they become sub* 
jected. 

" Let the custom of Tainistact abide." 

And it was right and good. 

"And Ardri said, " What if the judgments stand?" 

And all said, "Yea." 

And Ardri said, " Let the writing of Eolus and 
the words of the chronicles be read." 

And I Neartan did read the words thereof, and 
when I had made an end, 

Ardri said, 

" Let the heralds say without, 

" Standeth any one on Tobrad for justice ?* 

And it was answered, " Nay." 

And the assembly went forth, and the doors of 
the high chamber were closed. 



108 CHRONICLES 

Am] Eocaid suffered not any one to depart whilst 
Baal abided in his house Fluicim. 

The song and the harp, and dance, and tales of 
other times, and sports ceased not. 

And after one moon all took their departure from 
Tobrad, save Ardri, he dwelleth thereon. 

Note. Though the chronicles give a good idea of the facts herein 
related, few words may not prove unacceptable to render the his- 
tory perfectly clear. 

As at some certain stage of society, every nation of the earth has 
produced its legislator, *o halh Eri her Eocaid Olam Fodla. His was 
a spirit of peace, and having lamented the strife and contention that 
had existed ever since the arrival in this island of this tribe, and fore- 
seeing the probability of a dreadful continuance thereof, if some bond 
of union should not be devised, he conceived the idea of a triennial 
assembly of the kings, princes, nobles, a deputation of the Olam, and 
heads of the people an epitome of representation. The place ot 
meeting was on the mount of Tobrad, the situation almost central, 
whereon Eocaid had erected an house durable, in which was one 
apartment where the states sat, called the "high chamber ofTeacmor 
on Tobrad." The usual season for calling the assembly together 
was the beginning of November, when the fires were lighted on all 
the summits of the plains of Eri. The nine laws established at this 
time, were, with a very few additions, the only laws of Eri whilst 
sovereignty resided within the land ; they sufficiently demonstrate 
the genius of the people. 



CHAP. V. 



Now Eocaid lay beneath the covering of his tent, 
and the rain descended in torrents; but he would 
not enter into the chambers of Teacmor. 



OF ERI. J09 

For he said, "The sons of Marcac and lolar 
abide in their tents." 

He would not be intreated. 

And Eocaid is intent on building up a house dur- 
able for Olam, and of the youth nigh unto Teacmor, 
but the rains and the cold did prevent the work. 

Now Baal had entered into his house Blat, and 
Eocaid moved towards Dun Sobairce. 

And when it was known through Ullad that the 
king was within the land, all the princes, and all 
the chiefs, and of the Olam, and of Gaal, flocked 
about him. 

And tents were raised up about Dun Sobairce. 

Now Eocaid took delight in hearing- the tales of 
other times, and Noradan told the tale of Ait and 
Deama, and of the dog Gaot/i, in the presence of 
Eocaid, in the ears of the people. 

And Eocaid inquired if the tale was true, or the 
invention of the fancy of the bards ? 

And Meiltan the aged chief of Larn, said, " The 
words are true; in the tent of my dwelling now 
abideth Cosluath, sprung from Gaot/t." 

And Eocaid said unto Noradan, 

" Let the \\ords of the tale be set down, they are 
of pleasure and instruction, fit to be told and heard." 

And Eocaid made a circuit of Ullad, at the charge 
of the king; and he did give directions that houses 
durable should be buildecl at Druimcrit and Druim- 
mor, and where the booth of the Olam standeth, 
nigh unto Dun Sobairce, as Eolus had thought to 
do. 

And he did pass through the land of Firgneat to 



110 CHRONICLES 

Oldanmact, he had desire to speak with Meirt, chief 
of the Danan. 

And as he passed through the land of Geintir, lie 
did chance to see Tatla, a damsel of that land : 
she was fair, yea, very fair. Tatla was in every 
month in Geintir, and how she abided with her wi- 
dow mother, nor could be won to leave her and the 
little ones, by any of the Dorlam of Firgneat. 

And Eocaid took Tatla unto him. 

And messengers were sent through Ullad with 
words, saying, 

" Let the princes and nobles, and nine chiefs of 
the Olam, and twice nine heads of the people, meet 
the king on the mount of Ullad, out of hand." 

And Eocaid sent words unto Morda chief judge, 
aind unto Nelt judge in Ardlam. and unto Beirid 
judge in largael, to come unto him in Dun Sobairce. 

And when the assembly were together, 

Eocaid rose and said, 

" We are met to hold talk on laws for Ullad. It 
is known unto you that the words are set down on 
the roll on the table of the high chamber of Teac- 
mor on Tobrad. 

" Hath any here present to add thereto?" 

And Morda stood up, and said, 

" Hath riot the king thought of the judges choos- 
ing from amongst them to sit in the assembly of Eri, 
and to stand with the king on the mount of Ullad 
for times to comer" 

And Eocaid s&ld, 

" The king hath thought, and he hath determined 
that the office of the judge is to listen to complaints 



OF ERI. 

of the injured, to hear the Clnastig, and to read 
aloud the words on the roll of the laws. 

" How be it 'twere well that some three of the jus- 
ticers were with the assembly, to speak if'called upon, 
but by no means to hold up their right hands. 

" Therefore, what if three of the judges named by 
the king stand on the mount with the assembly 
hereafter ?" 

And it was so. 

And the king said, 

, " What if the chief judge read aloud the words on 
the roll of the laws ofEri?" 

And Morda did read the words. 

And Eocaid said, " What if the nine laws for En 
be accepted as laws for Ullad ?" 

And all said, " Yea." 

And Eocaid said, 

" What if the judgments stand even here also?" 

And all said, " Yea." 

And Eocaid said, 

" What if the custom of Tainistact abide also ?* 

And all said, " Yea." 

And Eocaid said, 

" Let the writings of Eolus and the words of the 
chronicles be read aloud." 

And Meilt, chief of the Olam of Dun Sobairce, 
did read the writings of Eolus, and the chronicles of 
Gaelag. 

And I Neartan did read the words of the chro- 
nicles of Eri. 

And the king bad the heralds to say aloud, 
x " Stand any on the mount for justice?'* 

And no voice answered. 



112 CHRONICLES 

And all the assembly did abide at Dun Sobairce 
for nine days in mirth and great joy. 

And Eocaid called unto him Feargus, a prince of 
Ullady Delb of the Olam, and Morda, chief judge, 
to sit for the king in Ullad. 

And he did give a charge unto Feargus to have 
an eye to the work of the Mur Olamam. 

And unto Delb he did intreat to speak to the 
Olam, to nourish the fire of the spirit of the youth, 
and to repeat in their ears the lessons of wisdom, till 
their tender minds should comprehend the truth of 
the words thereof. 

Now Eocaid moved towards Teacmor\ 

His mind intent on building Mur Olamam of 
Teacmor. 

And Mur Olamam is builded up, nevertheless the 
Olam have not entered therewithin. 

And there is peace throughout Eri: Ardri is the 
delight of all the children of the land : 

He doth walk in the ways of justice ; reason light- 
ing his paths, truth directing his steps thereon. 

Now when Baal entered the threshold of his house 
larsgith, Eocaid moved towards Dun Sobairce, and 
he bad ArdJ'ear, a prince of Ullad, to call compa- 
nions to him, and to go unto Tobrad, and to abide 
there ; and to send tidings unto him if any thing did 
hap fit for his ear. 

And on the morrow, after Eocaid reached unto 
Dun Sobairce, he did say unto me, 

" Neartan, go thou to Mur Olamam, and wait my 



coming." 



And on the next day Eocaid went towards Mur 



OF ERI. 

Qlamain, and all the Olam, and all the youths went 
forth to meet the king. 

And when they arrived at the door of Mur Olam* 
ain, the Olam made way that the king may go therein. 

But Eocaid said, " Nay, not so ; let the Olam en- 
ter. No man should appear so great as the teacher in 
the eye of his disciple." And the king would have 
it so. 

And Eocaid was seated in the midst, and he did 
utter lessons of wisdom, instruction to the minds of 
the wisest of the Olam of Ullad. 

And he did give strict charge to the Olam to take 
care of the youth. 

Eri enjoyeth peace on every side. 

And when Eocaid had ruled in Ullad for the cir- 
cuit of six rings, Don king in Gaelen died, having 
ruled one score and seventeen rings, and Roitheasac 
his son was chosen. 

And Eocaid did not return to Teacmor till Baal 
had entered his house Blat ; and nine of the Olam 
of Ullad were in his company. 

And when every thing was ready that they may 
enter into Mur Olamain of Teacmor -, Eocaid did go 
thither with them, and he did seat them therein, and 
they did eat of the king's meat every day. 

And his mind was in doubt what he should do ; 
for he said, " Should portions be dealt out unto the 
Olam of Teacmor, before the assembly shall be toge- 
ther on Tobrad, consenting thereunto, peradventure 
the kings of Mumain or Gaelen may think evil 
therefrom." 

And he called Ardfear, and me Neartan unto 

VOL. II. I 



114 CHRONICLES 

him, and many words did pass ; at length Ardn 
said, 

" One ring and two Ratha is too long a time that 
the youth be neglected, the work shall not stand." 

And he called the Olam to him, and he bad them 
to receive the youth who should come unto them. 

And he did set out nine portions for the Olam, and 
nine equal portions for the youths of the land of 
Ardri. 

And when it was known, the children of the land 
did flock to Mur Olamain; for till now the youth of 
Gaelen were neglected. There the priest is regarded 
as the bard and the minstrel, yea, as the dancing- 
master is in Mumctin, and as the Olam in the land of 
Ullad. 

And Feargus did send words from Dun Solairce 
unto Ardri, of practices of the priests in Ullad, re- 
specting the Carneac, and offerings to Baal. 

But Eocaid bad that the words be guarded till he 
should be in Dun Sobairce; and he added, moreover, 
" The priests must be spoken of on the mount." 

Every tongue in Ullad is loud in Feargus praise, 
he ruleth the land in truth and wisdom, in justice 
and in mercy. 

Ardri abideth on Tobrad, his mind intent on Mur 
Olamain of Teacmor. 



CHAP. VI. 

Now the messengers went forth through JEW 'with 
letters, saying, 

" Let the kings, princes, and nobles, and chiefs of 



OF ERI. ] J5 

the Olam, and heads of the people, meet Ardri in the 
high chamber of Teacmor on Tobrad, what time the 
fires shall be lighted on the summits of the plains of 
ErL" 

And when the time came, and the assembly were 
together, Ardri rose from the throne, and he did say, 

" When the days of mirth shall have passed, Ardri 
hath words for the ear of the assembly, touching 
Mur Olamain of Teacmor." 

. And when he had made an end, the heralds said 
aloud, 

" A man of Firgneat standeth on Tobrad to corn- 
plain of the Danan" 

And the king said, " Let it be inquired, doth the 
Danan hear the words of Feargneat ?" 

And it was answered, " Nay/' 

And Eocaid said, 

. " Let the man of Geintir abide in the tents of the 
king, and let a messenger with words be sent unto 
Meirt chief in Oldanmact" 

And the assembly went forth, and the boards 
were spread, and there were feasts and sports, and 
all were full of joy and gladness. 

And on the ninth day the doors of the high cham- 
ber were opened, 

And Ardri rose, and said, 

" Since the assembly of Eri were together, even 
ftere, Eocaid hath had Mur Olamain of Teacmor 
builded durable, and nine Olam, and many of the 
youths of Gaelen dwell therewithin. 

" And twice nine portions of the land of Ardri 
have been assigned unto them. 

1 2 



1 CHRONICLES 

" What though the word of Eocaid sufficeth so 
long as he endureth, yet hath he thought fit to make 
known his desire, that the work which he hath be- 
gun may be upheld for ever, by the arm of the law, 
sanctioned by the assembly, 

" Therefore, 

" What if the portions of the Olam, and of the 
youth in Mur Olamain of Teacmor abide ? n 

And Roiteasac said, 

" Hath Eocaid words concerning the portions of 
the priests on the lands of Ardri ?" 

And Eocaid answered, " Nay. How be it, hath 
Roiteasac aught to say, the ear of Eocaid is open to 
hear, and his tongue will be ready to make answer 
thereunto," 

But Roiteasac held his peace. 

And Eocaid repeated his words, 

" What if the portions of the Olam, and of the 
youth in Mur Olamain of Teacmor abide?" 

And it was so. 

And Eocaid did conduct Ceas and Roiteasac, 
and of the princes and nobles of Mumain and of 
Gaelen to Mur Olamain of Teacmor; and the Olam 
of the assembly did thither go also with Neartan. 

And the spirit of Eocaid did rejoice, and the spirit 
of Neartan was partner of the silent thoughts of the 
king; how be it, a ray of disappointment darted from 
his heart, and appeared on the countenance of Eo- 
caid, when he did behold the levity of Mumain, and 
he did feel the indifference of Gaelen, king, princes, 
and nobles of that land. 

And when Eocaid returned to Teacm.or, he said 



OF ERI. 117 

unto me Near tan, " Hope of Gaelen, yea, and of 
Mumain, languisheth within me." 

Now the assembly were together in the high cham- 
ber of Teacmor, and the heralds said, without and 
within, 

" The man of Geintir and a noble of Oldanmact 
stand on Tobrad" 

And Ardri said, 

" Let them enter." 

And Feargneat stood before the king, and said, 

" The king looketh on Seatam one of Geintir, as 
the men of Er say, and Seatam saith, 

" The Danan flingeth out, yea, as the steed fed at 
the stall of the chief of Eri, loosed without a rider; 
the Danan is light, eased of tribute by Ullad, for 
Stanclidden, our Obbo that they took from us with 
clubs, Obbo that our fathers had from the seamen of 
the world that was. 

" Have the masters of Fodla forgotten how our 
fathers did help their fathers to win our land of the 
Danan for them ; the Danan remembereth the evil of 
our fathers; will not the rulers of Fodla call to mind 
the good of them also ? 

" The Danan go through our land, and pass over 
the waters thereon at their pleasure, and when our 
men did stand before them, did they not smite our 
people? Doth not one of Graidal now lie covered 
with wounds? 

" And when words were sent unto Meirt chief in 
Oldanmact, he that bear the words, was he suffered 
to pass ? 

" Therefore do I Seatam, a man of Fodla, stand 



M8 CHHOMCLKS 

on this ground to say these things, and to hear the 
words of the king." 

And Ardri said, 

" Let the Danan answer." 

And Oslot, a noble ofOldanmact, replied in anger, 

" Ts the Danan to have law from his servant? 
Shall Cloden stay the waters of the land from us ?" , 

And the king rose up, and said, 

" Oslot, what time the sons of Golam did win 
this land, they did not lead thy fathers into captivity, 
did they even treat them with rigour ? 

" Hath not Eteerial set down the words of the 
bi eath of Marcac, saying, 

" The children of Iber would not be slaves, uor 
will they rule over slaves. 

" And shall the Danan oppress the race produced 
from the elements of this land ? 

" Ere the Danan hither came from beneath the 
fingers of Baal; ere the Gaol first touched the 
borders of the waters of blessed Affreidgeis, yea, 
what time all things were produced, were not the 
great fathers of Cegail Firgneat, of this their Fodla^ 
Danba of thine, this our Eri, lords of this land, since 
the world of land appeared till ye did come over 
them? And shall no tiie sons and daughters of Fodla 
have rest on the bosom of their proper mother? 

" Let Oslvt repeat die words of Ardri in the 
hearing of Meirt, and let peace abide through Eri" 
And Oslot drew nigh unto the throne, and he did 
say aloud wrath fully, 

" If Oslot should rehearse the words of the king 
in the presence of Meirt, may not Meirt say, 



OF ERI.. , HJ) 

" Did Ibcr overcome Danan, by the treachery of 
Cloden 'did he win all? Is not Oldanmact our's by 
covenant? 

" Should Her rule Cloden hardly, and Cloden 
complain to the Danan, what would be the words 
of Iber if Meirt should say, Hold thy hand, Iber? n 

And Ardri said, 

" Oldanmact is thine by the covenant of peace on 
Magmortiomna, and that covenant shall stand, how- 
beit Oslot seerneth to forget the race of Golam, not 
the Danan rule in .Eri. 

" The sons of Eri have given the hand of friend- 
ship to the chiefs of Oldanmact. 

" Tatla, the partner of the secret thoughts of 
Eocaid, is of the daughters of Fodla. 

" Eocaid will not speak, let the assembly decide; 
the while- let Oslot and Seatam be seated with the 
nobles of Eri" 

And they held talk. 

And Ruidruide, a prince of Uttad, rose and said, 

" What if that which hath passed be no more 
thought upon ? and for the time to come, the Danan 
go riot wilfully through the land, nor pass on the 
waters of Firgneat doing them injury, 

" Nor the Firgneat stray over the land of the 
Danan craftily ?" 

And it was so. 

And the king said, 

" Let Oslot and Seatam give hands of friendship 
and the word of peace." 

And Ardri said, 

" When the words are set down on the roll of the 



120 CHRONICLE* 

chronicles, the assembly will be called together to 
hear them." 

And it was so. 

And Eocaid took Oslot and Sea tarn to the tent 
of Tatla, and they abided there. 

And the kings of Eri, and princes and nobles did 
make a circuit of the portion of Ardri, and flocks 
and herds of Ardri are thereon, and many of the 
Gaal dwell thereon also, Eocaid hath disturbed them 
not. 

And when the words were written on the book of 
the chronicles, the assembly were together in the 
high chamber. 

And Ardri rose and said, 

" What if the words on the roll of the laws were 
read?" 

And they were read ; both the laws of Eri and 
the custom of Tainislact, and the words of the 
chronicles were read throughout, with the additions. 

And they were right and good. 

And the doors of the high chamber of Teacmor 
were closed. 

And Eocaid dwelt on Tobrad, and he encou- 
raged the Olam to fan the fire of the spirit of tne 
youth. 

Now the priests of Gaelen did think to trouble 
Eocaid, and to make the minds of the king and 
princes of that land evil towards nim. 

Nevertheless he doth keep on in his course, la- 
bouring for Eri continually. 

Feargus ruleth in Ullad, sitting nigh unto the 
seat of the king. 



OF ERI. 121 

The Gaol increase, cattle abound. 

Now when Baal had entered his house Blat, 
Eocaid moved towards Dun Sobairce. 

And he did make a circuit through the land of 
Ullad. 

And what time he did return unto Dun Sobairce, 
a messenger with letters awaited his coming thither, 

Saying, " Ceas, king in Mumain, hath ceased. 

" All of the race of Iher of the age, save Failbe, 
are calling together the warriors of Mumain, and 
Roiteasac hath listened to the voice of Roan, and 
hath promised to help him to the seat of the king 
in Mumain." 

And the words pained the heart of Eocaid, for he 
said, " It was the desire of my spirit that it should 
be said, in the hearing of the children of the land in 
times to come 

" Eri dwelt in peace whilst Eocaid a son of Er 
ruled." 

And Eocaid thought to go unto Mumain, to speak 
with the princes of Iber. 

Again he said, " Eocaid hath not been called for, 
and there are no words on the roll of the laws, nor 
yet aught in the custom of Tainistact, forbidding the 
doings of the sons of Iber" 

And, lo, whilst he was pondering on these things, 
a messenger came unto Eocaid with letters from 
Failbe the son of Marcac, the brother of Noid and 
of Ceas, and these are the words thereof: 

" The princes of Iber are calling together the war- 
riors of Mumain. Roiteasac causeth Roan to carry 
high his head, and raise his voice loudly above his 
brethren. 



122 



CHRONICLES 



" What though the desire of Faille is towards the 
seat of Marcac his father, he will not be seated 
thereon by the warriors of the land. 

" Failbehath profited by the lessons he hath heard 
from the lips of Eocaid: therefore he loveth peace, 
" If Eocaid would say unto Roiteasac, 
" Let the princes of Iber and of Ith, and the no- 
bles of Mumain say, Who shall sit on the seat of 
the king in Mumain, the sword, and the bow, and 
Cran Tubal hung up in the tents of the warriors, 
peace will abide." 

And the king sent unto me Neartan to come unto 
him ; and joy spread over his countenance as he did 
read unto me the words of Failbe. 

And on the morrow Ardri did move towards Teac- 
mor, the princes Ruidruide and Ros, and I Neartan, 
in his company. 

And Eocaid tarried two days on Tobrad ; and 
as he was passing nigh unto the mount of Gaelen, 
he did hear that Roiteasac was then at the tents of 
Don, chief of Almuin, and thither he went, 

And he did speak unto the king of Gaelen, and 
Roileasac did give unto Eocaid the word of pro- 
mise, that the warriors should abide within the land. 

And Eocaid did send letters unto the princes of 
Iber, and these were the words thereof: 

" A voice hath come unto the ear of Eocaid, king 
in Ullad, saying: 

" Ceas the son of Marcac, king in Mumain, hath 
ceased, the warriors are gathering themselves around 
the chiefs. 

" That Ceas is no more paineth the mind of Eo 
caid. 



OF ERI. 123 

" Mumain monrneth for him ; shall the time of wail- 
ing be prolonged by the strife of the princes of Iber, 
and the nobles and Gaol of the land ? 

" Now that laws have been made sure for Eri, 

" Are the sons of Iber carried beyond the bounds 
of reason in pursuit of dominion, Eocaid will freely 
quit the throne to make way fur another, that so 
peace may abide. 

" What if the princes of Iber and of Ith, and the 
nobles of Mumain say, Who shall sit in the place of 
Ceas, the warriors abiding in repose? 

" Eocaid, king in Ullad, desireth this of his bre- 
threo, as a brother seeketh a kindness from his bro- 
ther that his spirit doth languish for. 

" The mind of Roiteasac, king in Gaelen, is even 
as the mind of Eocaid" 

And Eocaid did send these words by the hand of 
his own messenger. 

And by the hand of the messenger of Failbe did 
he send words the same as the words which he did 
send unto the others of the princes of Iber. 

And he added moreover, i 

" The heart of Eocaid doth cleave unto Fa~ 
ilbe." 

And the words of Eocaid prevailed with the princes 
of Iber. 

The warriors abided in their tents ; and the princes 
and nobles moved to the mount, and they did chuse 
Failbe the son of Marcac king in Mumain. 

And Near tan said unto Ardri, 

" If the king would tell unto Neortan the words 
of the princes of Iber by the hand of the messenger 
of the Ardri, that they may be set down on the 



124 CHRONICLES 

book of the chronicles for the ear of the assembly of 
Teacmor on Tolrad" 

And the king said, " Nay. 

" Seest thou not that they were the words and 
the doings of Eocaid king in Ullad, not ofArdri? 

" When thou settest down these things for the 
chronicles of Ullad, thou wilt say 

" And Eocaid said unto Neartan, 

" May the princes of Her prove themselves worthy 
of Marcac the first-born of the hero, for all the times 
that are to come." 

And Eocaid abided in Teacmor; and he made 
additions to the house of the king, he builded up 
three chambers large, and three smaller: 

And he goeth to Mur Olamain continually ; he 
taketh delight in the youth he heareth, and he 
giveth lessons of wisdom. 

And what time Baal had entered the third cham- 
ber of his house larsgith, Eocaid moved towards 
Dun Sobairce. 

And he inquired of Feargus, if he looked into the 
matter concerning the priests. 

And Feargus said, 

" It hath been told unto me, The Carneac do col- 
lect offerings, calling them gifts for Baal, complain- 
ing that the Cruimtear take to themselves the whole 
portion of the land, saying unto them, 

" Do ye not live with the Gaal? Are not their 
tents open to you ? Is not the board spread before 
you ; for what do ye want ?" 

And the Gaal do complain that the priests terrify 
their minds with evil spirits of the air, over which 
Bmd hath given dominion unto them : 



OF ERI. 125 

Therefore the Carneac move not without an offer- 
ing, 

But of these things no words are spoken aloud, 
only from the mouth of one to the ear of another, 
for fear is on the minds of the Gaal because of the 
priests. 

And Feargus added moreover, 

" It is known unto me of a truth, the Cruimtear 
live in sloth and idleness amongst the heads of the 
people; and the Carneac dwell in poverty with the 
Gaal." 

And the messengers went forth through Uttad, say- 
ing, "Let the princes, and nobles, and chiefs of the 
Olam, and heads of the people, and the judges 
named, meet the king on the mount out of hand." 

And the messengers took letters to each of the 
chiefs, saying, 

" Let one of the Cruimtear and one of the Car- 
neac of thy Tainisteas be on the mount what time 
the assembly shall stand thereon about the king." 

And when the assembly were together on the 
mount, 

Eocaid rose and said, 

" Stand priests on the mount ?" 

And the heralds answered, " Yea." 

And Eocaid said, 

" Let the princes and nobles stand on my right, 
and the chiefs of the Olam, and the heads of the 
people stand on my left, and let the priests stand 
before the assembly." 

And he called the three judges nigh unto him. 

And the king raised his voice, and said, 



120 CHRONICLES 

" Words have been brought to Feargus, who sitteth 
for the king in Ullad, and from his lips have passed 
to the ear of Eocaid. 

"The Cruimtear take all the portion of the land 
set apart for the priests, and instruct the Carneac to 
call on the Gaal for offerings to J3aal, their only 
subsistence. 

" What if Ard Cruimtear declare his knowledge 
or ignorance of this thing?" 

And Ard Cruimtear looked upon the assembly, 
then turned his eyes on the priests, now on one 
side, now on another, still did he hesitate to make 
answer. 

And the king repeated his words. 

After a while, Ard Cruimtear raised his voice, and 
said, 

" If Ard Cruimtear was to hear, from the lips of 
which of the Carneac did the words come unto the 
ear of Feargus the prince ;" 

And Feargus said, " The names of the men are 
not known to me : howbeit, peradventure I may 
recollect their visage if they be here." 

And Feargus moved from his place towards the 
priests, but he saw not the face of any of those with 
whom he had talked'. 

And the heads of the people laughed aloud, and 
all the priests looked on the ground, afeared to meet 
the eye of the king. 

And Eocaid said, 

" Have the Carneac any, or what portion of the 
land? After what manner do they sustain life?" 

And all held their peace. 



or Eft*. 127 

After a while, Ard Cruimtear said, 

'* These things are of J&za/, and may not be spoken 
of in the hearing of the people." 

And Eocaid said, 

" At the present, the assembly is not prepared to 
hold talk." 

And he added moreover, 

" Let Morda read aloud the words on the roll of 
the laws of Ullad, and the customs of Taimstact." 

And the words were read. 

And Eocaid said, 

" Let the writings of Eolus be read." 

And it was so. 

And the king said, " To-morrow the book of the 
chronicles of Gaelag and of Eri shall be opened at 
Dun Sobairce!' 

And the heralds said aloud, 

" Standeth any one on the mount of Ullad for jus- 
tice ?" 

And none answered. 

And Eocaid, and all the assembly, and all the 
congregation round about the mount, save the priests, 
moved to Dun Sobairce. 

And the day and night were spent in mirth and 
festivity. 

And on the morrow, I Neartan did read the 
words on the book of the chronicles of Gaelag and 
of Eri. 

And the words were right and good. 

Eocaid abided at Dun Sobairce till Baal entered 
into his house Cruining, then he took his departure 
for Teacmor. 

And Failbe and Roiteasac did come to Teacmor 



128 CHRONICLES 

together ; the desire of Failbe was strong to see 
Eocaid: and he did pass to the tents of the king of 
Gaelen, that he may bear him company. 

The heart of Eocaid is gladdened ; and he said 
onto me, " Neartan, hope is revived in me. Failbe 
hath not been surpassed in wisdom, no not by any 
of the race of the hero : Roiteasac may perad venture 
decline his ear from the priest to listen to the voice 
of the Olam" 

And they did go to Mur Olamain ofttimes ; and 
the Olam forebore to speak of the fancies of the 
priests slightingly, because of Roiteasac. 

And Failbe and Roiteasac did tarry at Teacmor 
one entire moon ; and they lay in the chambers 
which Eocaid had builded to Teacmor. 

For the hill of Tobrad, standing high above the 
plain, when the winds do blow, and the rains de- 
scend, the unsheltered tent doth not suffice. 

Nevertheless Ardri did not enter into Teacmor, 
to dwell till this time; for he said, " Eocaid will 
give no cause of jealousy to the minds of his bre- 
thren." 

And what time JBaal entered his house Sgith, 
Eocaid moved to Dun Sobairce. 

And he inquired of Feargus concerning the priests, 
and Feargus did tell unto the king, that he did hear 
of a truth, 

That the priests had contrived with subtlety, that 
none of the Carneac, who had spoken unto Feargus, 
should be called to the mount : howbeit, this was 
done without the knowledge of the chiefs. 

And the messengers were sent forth through Uttad, 
saying, 



OF ERI 129 

" Let the assembly be on the mount what time 
Baal shall be in the third chamber of his house Meas: 
and let all the priests stand on the mountalso." 

And whilst Baal was thither moving, Eocaid did 
go through Ullad at the charge of the king, nought 
took he of any ; his tents were on the bearers every 
third day. 

And he did pass into Geintir, and he did see 
Tata the mother of Tatla, and those who followed 
the king did bring divers presents for her. 

And Eocaid said unto Neartan, " The (Mam hold 
that ignorance vaunteth itself. What if the state 01 
naan was more particularly spoken of within the 
schools? Methinks that ignorance is too humble. 
Behold Firgneat. 

" It is when man is wise in his own conceit, hath 
knowledge, but what he knoweth is not the fact, 
which yet he doth mistake ; therefore not ignorant, 
but unknowing of the truth. 

" It is in such a state vanity doth lay hold of 
man me thinks. 

" If discourse was held amongst the Olam of 
these things. 

" It were well that of the Olam some did abide 
with the Firgneat. 

" The mind of Roiteasac seemeth now to have 
taken a right direction, yet do I fear the whispers of 
the priests. 

" Whispers of a deceitful tongue are as the waters 
of the mountain stream ; they do insinuate them- 
selves through all the passages to the very heart, 
weeping all that is profitable in their winding 
course." 

VOL. II. K 



130 CHRONICLES 

And Eocaid did go into all the schools, and great 
was the joy of the king. 

Now the assembly was on the mount, and all the 
priests of Ullad stood nigh unto. 

And the king said, 

" Let the priests come before the assembly." 

And it was so. 

And the king raised his voice and said, 

" When last we were gathered together, even here, 
we did hear of the answer of Ard Cruimtear, say- 
ing, 

" The priests may not speak of those things which 
belong to Baal in the hearing of the people. 

" Could Ard Cruimtear have denied the words that 
Feargus said had been spoken unto him by the 
Carneac, must not his desire have been vehement to 
have gainsaid them ? 

" Moreover, words have come unto me of the ar- 
tifice of the priests, who did contrive to have all the 
Carneac retained in the land of their dwelling who 
had spoken unto Feargus of the transgression of the 
Cruimtear. 

" Though the deceit of Ard Cruimtear may so 
appear to myself, let that abide, it hath not been 
proven : 

" Therefore, 

" Let the heralds say aloud in the hearing of the 
priests and of the people round about, 

" Standeth one on the mount for justice?" 

And none answered. 

And the king said, 

" Let the chronicles be read aloud, of all the time 
of Ardfear the son of Og, chief in Gaelag" 



OF ERI. 131 

And it was so. 

And the king said, 

" The Olam in the land of Ullad are four times 
nine and one Olam moreover, whilst the Cruimtear 
and Carneac are treble that number, and over and 
above. 

" The priests have their portions, that they should 
instruct the children of the land : these portions do 
they enjoy, leaving the care of the youth to the Olam 
continually. 

" Besides, priests do abdund, their children are 
Cruimtear, yea, and Carneac, living on the offerings 
of the people unto Baal, the substance of the Gaal 
consumed thereby. 

" Therefore, 

" What if offerings for Baal cease, and should 
the priest decline from his office, saying, Where is 
the offering ? and the thing be made manifest unto 
the Cluastig, 

" What if the judge say aloud, 

" Let such a one lose his portion ?" 

And all said, " Yea." 

And the king said, 

" What if the portions of the priests through Ullad 
shall be four times nine portions from the time that 
of the Cruimtear and the Carneac now being, the 
number shall be even with the four times nine por- 
tions of the land ?" 

And all said, " Yea." 

Arid the words were added to the words on the 
roll of the laws of Ullad. And the assembly moved 
with the king unto Dun Sobairce. 

And the tents were raised up round about the 

K 2 



132 CHRONICLES 

house of the king ; and the feast was prepared, and 
the song, and the harp and dance, and tales .of other 
times. 

And on the morrow the chronicles were read 
aloud in the hearing of the congregation. 

No Cruimtear nor Carneac was there ; they had 
moved to the tents of their dwellings in their abase- 
ment, aiming words of scorn at the king, that hurted 
none but themselves : all but the Cruimtear blessed 
the king. 

And Eocaid did not return to Teacmor till Baal 
had run one-half of his course through his house 
Blat. 



CHAP. VII. 

Now what time Baal entered the threshold of his 
house larsgith, the messengers went forth through 
Eri, with letters, saying, 

" Let the kings, princes, and nobles, chiefs of the 
Olam, and heads of the people, and the judges 
named, meet Ardri, in the high chamber of Teacmor, 
on Tobrad, what time the fires shall be lighted on 
the summits of the plains of Eri." 

And ere the assembly were on Tobrad, Eocaid 
had chambers prepared for Failbe and Roiteasac 
within Teacmor. 

And when he did speak thereof to Failbe, Failbe 
said, " Nay: the princes and nobles of Mumain did 
hear of my laying under the covering of Teacmor 
when last I was hereon ; and when I did return to 



OF ERI. 133 

Mumain, they did inquire of me if I could endure 
my tent for times to come. Therefore," 

And Eocaid answered, Failbe is right. And Ardri 
abided in his tent also. 

Now the assembly of Eri being together, 

It happed on that day, that strife arose between 
Cealtar chief of Ailb, and Dubar chief in Oir. 

And the strife was, that Dubar would sit nigher 
unto the throne than Cealtar, 

And they fought foot to foot beside the waters 
of Buidaman; and Dubar fell into the arms of death, 
his neck half cut through by the sword of Cealtar. 

And when the assembly were together on the 
fourth day, 

Neartaji, Ard Olam, even I, rose up, amongst the 
kings and princes of the land, and I did say, 

" Delightful is the calm of peace to the soul of the 
Olam; the spirit of the warrior rejoiceth in the tu- 
mult of battle. 

" Dubar hath ceased ; no ray of glory on his fall : 
Fame and renown are not the fruit of pride and 
vanity. 

" Are not all the sons of the hero equal? 

" Is Ardri seated above his fellows, what though 
his birth from the race be of chance,, not so his pre- 
eminence. 

" Are not all the nobles of Eri equal in the high 
chamber of Teacmor ? 

" Shall a chief take his seat farther from, or nigher 
unto the throne as a seat of preference, making him- 
self the judge of his own excellence ? 

" Let it not be told in the ears of those that are 



134 CHRONICtES 

to come, that blood was twice shed because of this 
thing. 

" Therefore, 

" What if the cloth were spread, and the lots cast, 
and where the lots shall point, there let the chief 
take his place for times to come." 

And the words of Neartan did chance to find fa- 
vour in the minds of all the assembly. 

Now when Ard Cruimtear came to hear that the 
cloth was to be spread on the floor of the high 
chamber, he went unto Ardri, and he said unto 
him 

" Words have passed to the ear of Eacon, that 
the cloth is to be spread for the places of the chiefs. 

" Hath it not been told unto the king from lonar, 
that Liqfail covered the lots of the Danan ? 

" Was not Liafail sent by Baal unto the Goal of 
Sciot in Iber, whilst our fathers abided in Gaelag, 
and hither borne in the ship of Cathac? 

" Are not lots from Baal? and shall not the 
priests, his servants, still wait on Liafail, his mes- 
senger ? 

" Did not Ardri receive the asion and mantle on 
blessed Liafail at the hand of the high-priest? 

" What if Ardri should say unto the assembly, 

"Let Eacon enter even here with Liafail, and 
take the lots for the seats of the chiefs, and gather the 
offerings for Baal ? 

" So may all the lots for the king and Teacmor 
be casted for ever/' 

And Eocaid answering, said, 

" My ear hath inclined to hear the words of Ea- 
con, but my mind entertaineth them not : however, 



OF ERI. 135 

if it pleaseth Eacon, the king will repeat his words 
in the hearing of the assembly on the morrow." 

And when the assembly were together on the 
morrow, Ardri rose, and he did repeat the words of 
Eacon. 

And the king of Gaelen rose, and said, 

" What did Ardri answer unto Eacon?" 

And Eocaid said, "Ardri said unto him neither 
this thing nor that; but that he would repeat his 
words in the ears of the assembly, which he hath 
done accordingly." 

And all called for the judgment of Ardri. 

And Eocaid said, " What if we hold talk?" 

Still was the judgment of Ardri called for aloud. 

And Eocaid said, 

" The minstrel to his harp 

" The bard to his measures 

" The Olam to philosophy, to nourish the young 
mind with lessons of truth and wisdom^ thereby to 
teach man to subdue his passions 

" The people to make laws 

" The judges to declare the words thereof 

" The king to see them observed 

" Ardri to watch over Eri 

" The priest to wait on the moon, and mark the 
seasons, and note times, and watch the motion of 
Tarsnasc,(d) to guard the blessed fires, and kindle 
the blaze, to direct the wayfaring man in the dark- 
ness of the night, and to comfort him beneath the 
covering of his booth. 

" What hath the never-changing Baal to do with 
the chance of lots? 

" Let none enter into the office of another. 



136 CHRONICLES 

"When the chiefs of the Olam, and the heads of 
the people, were hither called to assist in the framing 
of laws, 

" It seemed not good at that time that judges who 
are to read the words of the laws, and are named by 
the king; 

" Nor yet the priest; why? let causes now lack ; 
should sit even here, to be aiding therein. 

" Therefore, for Eocaid he doth say, 

" Let not the priest enter unto the high chamber 
of Teacmor for ever." 

And it was so. 

And the cloth was spread, and the lots were cast 
by the secretaries of the high chamber. 

And Eocaid said, 

" What if the shields of the nobles shall be hung 
up, and each chief sit beneath his shield for the times 
to come." 

And it was so. 

And the words concerning the priests were added 
to the words on the roll of the laws of Eri. 

And the words concerning the nobles were to be 
of Tainistact. 

And now a messenger came from Feargus unto 
Ardri, saying, 

" Tatla layeth on the bed of sickness, her eye 
doth long to look on her beloved." 

And Eocaid called together the assembly what 
time Baal should come forth on the morrow. 

And Neartan did read the words of Feargus; 
and the king of Mumain said, " What if the words 
on the roll of the laws, and the book of the chroni- 
cles be read?" 



OF ERI. 137 

And it was so. 

And the heralds said aloud, 

" Standeth any on Tobrad for justice?" 

And none answered. 

And the assembly went forth, and the doors of 
the high chamber were closed. 

And on the morrow Eocaid took his departure for 
Dun Sobairce. 

And in six days after he was in Dun Sobairce, 
Tatla was no more. 

And a messenger was sent to Geintir to the 
brethren of Tatla, with words 

" Tatla is no more; shall what remaineth of Tatla 
be laid in Ullad, or where else ?" 

And a vast multitude did return with the mes 
senger to the king ; and the weight of Tatla was 
borne to Geintir. 

And a great congregation of the children of Ullad 
did accompany the Firgneat. 

And many coffers were borne filled with the cloth- 
ing, and mantles, and fine cloth, and clasps and bod; 
kins, and curious girdles for the mother of Tatla. 

And kine of all sorts on which Tatla took delight' 
to look, as they grazed on the pastures of Dun So- 
bairce, did the herdsmen of the king drive for her 
kindred to the land of Firgneat. 

And the death of Tatla, and the lamentation 01 
Ullad, for she was beloved of the children of the land, 
and the wailing of Geintir \$ it not amongst the 
mournful songs of the bards in the writing ofMasalah? 

And Eocaid doth mourn for that Tatla is no 
more. 

And he returned to Teacmor, for he said unto 



138 



CHRONICLES 



Neartan, every step I take, every thing I look upon 
here, remindeth me of Tatla. 

And after a while Failbe king of Mmnain carne 
to Teacmor, and he did abide with Eocaid for two 
moons, and they did go to Mur Olamain continually ; 
Eocaid and Failbe are as brethren, whose hearts are 
knitted together. 

And Meirt chief of Oldanmact, did send a mes- 
senger unto Teacmor, saying, 

" Meirt is the friend of the king." 

And the spirit of Eocaid was rejoiced ; he said 
unto me Neartan, " This is very good, no storm that 
can blow from Gaelen can shake the peace of Eri. 

" The children of the land are in repose." 

(a) Tarsnasc is the constellation Orion. 



CHAP. VIII. 

Now Eocaid had ruled for the circuit of sixteen 
rings, and messengers went forth to summon the 
great congregation of the land. 

And when the assembly were together, Ardrirose 
and said, 

" Let the heralds hang the shields on the pillars 
raised up to receive them, that the nobles may take 
their seats beneath." 

And it was so. 

And Ardri said, 

" Eocaid hath words for the ears of the assembly, 
when the days of feasting shall have passed, con- 



OF ERI. 139 

cerning the Olam and the youths of Mur Olamain 
of Teacmor" 

And when the days had passed, and the assembly 
were together, 

Ardri rose and said, 

" When the sons of Golam, and Lugad son of Ith, 
and the nobles and warriors, their hands upon their 
swords, did hither come, and win this land, did one 
drive the foe before him more than another? 

" Could the princes and nobles make place for 
themselves on the land ? 

" Could priests and justicers bear down the 
Danan ? 

" When the Gaol did stand before the foe, might 
not fear at some time have taken possession of their 
minds, had not the Olam, ^ind the bards and the 
minstrels poured fresh spirit into the soul of the 
warriors ? 

" And the kings, and princes, and nobles, priests, 
and judges, have their portions, and the Gaol by 
their tribes, whilst the Olam, the teacher of wisdom, 
hath a scanty provision. 

" And the pinions of the fancy of the bard are 
stiffened, and the finger of the minstrel is benumbed 
by the keen blasts of chilling penury. 

" Doth not man breathe in air, his spirit refreshed 
by water, fed by fire? Doth he not live by the 
earth ? 

"Is not the land the birth-right of all the children 
thereof, to the sustenance of life, as much as air and 
water? 

" The Olam of Mur Olamain of Teacmor, and the 
youths therein lack. 



140 CHRONICLES 

" Is it fitting that the teachers, who feed the un- 
derstanding with the seeds of truth and knowledge 
bearing the ripe fruit of wisdom, should not be sus- 
tained by the land, from the elements of which they 
have been produced? 

" The minds of the youth, yea, and of the Olam, 
will they not be invigorated by the tales of other 
times from the bards, and by the harp instructed by 
the delicate hand of the minstrel, to rouse the spirit 
to energy in deeds of glory, or to steep the senses in 
forgetfulness of the weight that oft oppresseth, mak- 
ing man bear the burden lightly e'en for the passing 
time ? 

" Shall these delightful solacers of others' griefs be 
care worn themselves ? 

" Is it fitting that the bard make barter of the 
sweet tale, that the minstrel merchandize the voice 
of his enchanting harp, as our fathers tell of the 
children of Feme, who traffic in their fellow man ? 

" Therefore, 

" What if one-third more be added to the portions 
of the Olam, and the youth in Mur Olamain of Teac- 
mor, from the land of Ardri ; and three portions, ac- 
cording to the rules of Mumain, for the bard ; and 
three portions for the minstrel, that fancy may be 
free as the element it doth delight to gambol in?" 

And all said, " Yea," sportively, save the Olam ; 

The judges and the secretaries, yea the very her- 
alds could not contain their words within their lips, 
their breath did mingle with the general voice. 

The Olam did put their fingers on their lips, their 
hands on their breasts, and they did incline their 
heads thankfully. 



OF ERI. 141 

And Eocaid said, " Let this be of.Tainistact." 

And it was so. 

And the assembly were on Tobrad through the 
course in Flucim. 

And when Baal touched the entrance of his house 
Siocan, the assembly were in the high chamber of 
Teacmor. 

And the roll of the laws was spread out, and the 
words were read ; 

And the book of the chronicles was opened, and 
the words were repeated aloud. 

And the heralds called without, 

" Doth any stand for justice on Tobrad?" 

And none answered, 

And the assembly went forth, and the doors ot 
the high chamber were closed. 

And Faille king of Mumain did not return to his 
own land, he did tarry with Eocaid at Teacmor. 

And he did go unto Dun Sobairce with Eocaid;. 
and messengers went through Ullad, saying, 
: " Let the princes and nobles, and chiefs of the 
Olam, and heads of the people, and the judges 
named, come unto Dun Sobairce, what time Baal 
shall be in the second chamber of his house Blat." 

And the messengers said moreover, " The king of 
Mumain abideth at Dun Sobairce" 

And Eocaid conducted the king of Mumain to 
Mur Olamain of Drumcrit, and of Drummor: the 
soul of Failbe doth long for knowledge, and he 
did tell of Mumain and of Gaelen, and of the ways of 
the children of these lands sorrowfully. 

And Failbe was amazed and delighted; and he 
conversed with the Olam, and with the youths, and 



142 CHRONICLES 

he said, "The least of the youths within the schools 
ofUllad, appeareth to me to have greater knowledge 
than is to be found in Gaelen or in Mumain" 

What time Eocaid and Failbe returned to Dun 
Sobairce, many of the princes and of the nobles were 
at the howse of the king, time was divided between 
sport and seriousness. 

And when the time came, and the assembly were 
on the mount, 

Eocaid seated the king of Mumain on the seat be- 
side the seat of the king, whereon did sit Feargus at 
other times. 

And Eocaid said, 

" My desire in calling the assembly to the mount 
at this time was, that Failbe, the friend of Eocaid, 
should see and speak with the men of this land. 

" The mind of the king of Mumain doth hunger 
f>r knowledge, with which he doth desire to fill 
himself, and to feed the children of Mumain. 

" Now let the words on the roll of the laws be 
read, in the hearing of the assembly, and of all the 
congregation." 

And the words were read. 

And the herald called aloud, 

" Standeth one on the mount for justice?" 

And none answered, 

And the assembly and all round about the mount 
moved to Dun Sobairce. 

And the boards were spread, and the tents were 
raised up nigh unto Dun Sobairce, and there was 
feasting, and the song, and the harp, and the dance, 
and tales of times passed. 

And day after day, for twice nine days, was the 



OF ERI. 143 

chase after the manner of the hunter, and the race, 
and the skill of the bowman and the slinger was 
exercised, and feats of horsemanship. 

Now the king of Mumain said, " My memory 
keepeth not account of the days as they pass, yet 
doth the breeze of the morning whisper to my ear, 
the time draweth nigh to call me to Mumain." 

And Failbe turned his steps towards Mumain, 
and Eocaid, and princes, and nobles, and a great 
company of horsemen, accompanied him to the wa- 
ters of Eider. 

And Eocaid presented Failbe with four beautiful 
horses white as snow. 

And Eocaid took his departure from Dun Sobairce, 
what time Baal entered Meas. 

Now the minds ofRoiteasac and ofArd Cruimtear, 
and all the priests of Gaelen, were evil towards 
Ardri. 

And they thought to raise jealousy of him in the 
mind at Failbe; but Failbe did improve in wisdom 
day after day. 

And Eocaid sent Ros, a prince of Ullad, and 
Cartan, one of the Olam, unto Magn chief of Oldan- 
mact, in the place of Meirt his father, lately dead. 

And Ros did bear words from Eocaid unto Magn, 
saying, 

" Eocaid king in Ullad, Ardri, hath a desire to 
come to the dwelling of Magn, to give and receive 
the hand of friendship." 

And Ros did present unto Magn a mantle of ex- 
quisite workmanship, and a piece of tine cloth, and 
a curious girdle, and two fine horses, and two dogs 
from Ainleog and Sciot. 



144 CHRONICLES 

And Cartan did give into the hands of Magn the 
writings of Eolus, and the chronicles of Gaelag, but 
not the chronicles of Eri. 

For Eocaid said unto Cartan, 

" It were not fitting to set before the chief and 
nobles of Oldanmact, words that would pain their 
eye, and bear grief to their heart. Is not the glory 
ofjber built on the ruin of the fame of the Danan T* 

And Magn said, 

" My eye doth long to see the king of Eri." 

And Eocaid went towards Oldanmact, and Ros, 
and File a noble of Ullad, and four attendants ac- 
companied the king, all in close mantles ; for he 
said, " It must be shewn unto the Danan that our 
minds think on them as the mind thinketh on a 
friend." 

And when Eocaid came to the waters of Sean- 
aman, those who waited for his coming did not think 
it was the king, so few were in his company. 

And when they learned that it was Ardri they 
passed on the waters in the floats, and moved 
Eocaid and those in his company to the land of Ol- 
danmact. 

And multitudes came round the king, and as they 
were conducting him on his way, lo, Magn, and a 
gallant train, did meet him, and bare him company 
to the dwelling of the chief. 

And Eocaid tarried seven days with Magn, but 
no note was taken of what passed. 

For Magn said, "The wise men of Ullad write 
down words of time as it passeth, and these are read 
aloud in the hearing of the people continually. Let 



OF ERI. 145 

not the king repeat his own words nor the words of 
Magu hereafter/' 

And Eocaid did give to Magn the word of pro 
niise. 

And Eocaid did pass through Geinlir on liis way 
to Dun Sobairce; and he did see the kindred of 
Talla, and he did comfort them. 

Ardri doth watch over Eri, and he doth nourish 
the fire of the youth, great is the joy of his mind for 
their advancement in knowledge. 

Eri is in peace on every side. 



CHAP. IX. 

Now Eocaid had ruled one score rings in Utlad. 

And the assembly of Eri were together in the high 
chamber of Teacmor on Tobrud. 

When words were spoken by the heralds ; 

" Three nobles ofOldanmact stand on Tobrad with 
words from the chief of the Danan? 

And they were admitted, and they stood before 
the assembly, their swords on their backs, their 
spears in their left hands. 

And one of them came near unto the throne, and 
as he was about to speak, Ardri rose, and said, 

" Let the heralds inquire who the men are." 

And one replied, 

" We be nobles of Oldanmacl, \ am Saorlam of 
the Danau" 

And Ardri said, 

' Ye are welcome ;" and Eocaid added moreover, 
If the Danan cast their eyes round about, they 

vol. if. L 



146 CHRONICLES 

will not see a sword, nor weapon of war, save those 
borne by the nobles of Oldanmact. If Saorlam and 
his companions would suffer their swords and spears 
to abide in the house of the king, whilst they repose 
here in peace, under the safeguard of the laws." . 

And the Danan looked on each other, then turned 
their eyes round on the assembly, and they gave 
their swords and spears into the hands of the herald, 
Saorlam saying, 

The word of the king is renowned through all 
the nations of Eri ;" and Saorlam still standing nigh 
unto the throne, had begun to speak unto the king; 

When Ardri rose, and with a smile, said, " If 
Saorlam would speak in the hearing of the assem- 
bly ?" and he added unto the heralds, 

" Let the nobles of Oldanmact be seated with the 
princes of Ullad" 

And it was so, 

And Ardri said, 

" If Saorlam would speak ?" 

And Saorlam rose, and he did speak of the glory 
of his race, and how the Danan were borne on the 
waves of the sea, the old world before the world 
that is, felt the heat of the sun. 

And the Danan had ten score knots and more 
on Danbaere Iber touched this land. 

And he told how Cloden burrowed in the womb 
of the earth till the Danan brought them forth. 

Now hear the words ofMagn, 

" Saorlam, speak thou in the hearing of the kings, 
and princes, and nobles of Iber, and say unto them, 

It is told in Oldanmact, that when the chiefs 'of 
Iber are together, they hold talk of Eri, is not Ol- 



OF ERI. 147 

danmact in Eri ? are not the Danan of Eri ? is it 
good that words be spoken of Oldanmact and the 
Danan absent ? 

" Let the chiefs and nobles of Oldanmact sit with 
the chiefs of Iber, so shall their ears hear the words 
spoken of them, and of their land for the time to 



come." 



And when Saorlam had made an end, 
Ardri rose and said, 

" What if we hold talk, and that the Danan be 
seated ; so their ears witnesses to the words of our 
lips, their tongues may bear them to the chief ^nd 
nobles of their land ?" 
And they held talk. 

And Roiteasac king of Gaelen, rose and said, 
6 Will the lips of those who pay tribute utter 
their thoughts ? Oldanmact is of JEri, but is it not 
forbidden that the Danan pass over the waters of 
Seanaman ? Let him abide within his own land." 
And Maol chief of IbDronag, rose and said, 
" Words have been spoken in Gaelen that Ardri 
did pass over the Seanaman unto the tents of Magn. 
J)i4 the king thither go to put the words of Saorlam 
into the ear of the chief of Oldanmact ?" 

And Mar the aged chief of Oumar, rose and said, 
" Shall bondsmen sit amongst the princes of Eri? 11 
Whereupon the nobles of Oldanmact started from 
their seats, and Saorlam said aloud, 

" The Damn be not thy servants the king could 
not have thought that these words would have been 
spoken, when he did ask of us our swords and 
spears." 

it* 



148 CHRONICLES 

And a great murmur ran through the high 
chamber. 

After a while Ardri said, 

" The chief -of Cumar is aged, times have so long 
passed peradventure since he hath looked upon the 
words of the covenant of Magmortiomna, they have 
escaped from his memory. 

" Let not the spirit of the Danan be disturbed. 
The children of Iber have sworn to the covenant, 
and the sons of Er will observe it; the covenant 
they have sworn to, speaketh not of servitude, nor 
yet of tribute." 

And the king of Mumain rose and said, 

" Faille a son of Iber will guard the covenant of 
his father." 

And the Danan were composed, and Mar was put 
to- silence ; but Roiteasac rose again, and said, 

" Is it fit that the Danan sit where the Ard 
Cruimtear of the Goal of Sciet of Iber must not 
enter?*' 

And Ardri rose and said, 

" Eocaid did pass over the waters of Seanaman 
with the will of Magn ; the peace of Eri, and the 
good of Oldanmact directing his steps. 

" It entered not into his mind that of what Saor- 
Idm hath spoken, howbeit it rejoiceth him that 
Magn did think thereon." 

And Cobtac prince of Ib Lugad thinking Ardri 
made an end, rose, and Eocaid sat down. 

And Cobtac said, 

" What if the chief of Oldanmact sit in the high 
chamber behind the throne, so may he hear the 



OF ER1. 149 

words spoken of Eri and of the Danan; but let him 
not hold talk, nor hold up his hand." 

And when Cobtac was seated, many yoices called 
for the judgment of Ardri. 

Whereupon the king rose and said, 

" Three parts of this land did the sons of the hero 
win from the Danan, whose children dwell on their 
portion by covenant, and now those of these days 
say unto us, let us be counted of you, are we not of 
your Eri? What though ye may say, the Danan 
and the children of Iber be two, ye will not say Ol- 
danmact is not of Eri ? 

" The king of Gaelen saith, admit not the Danan, 
they pay tribute; and moreover he saith, shall the 
Danan be suffered where the Ard Cruimtear is de- 
nied ? 

" The prince of Ith saith, 

" Let the Danan sit behind the throne, let his ear 
hear, but let not his tongue speak, nor his hand be 
raised up. 

" For himself Ardri will say, 

" What if the chief, and eight of the nobles of Ol- 
danmact,&s shall be approved of, after the custom of 
that land, sit in the high chamber of Teacmor on 
Tobrad; so shall their ears hear the words spoken of 
this our Eri, their Danba of the elder time, and let 
them hold talk, and raise up their hands. 

" If their words be of wisdom, shall we not profit 
thereby ? Be they of ignorance, cannot we reject 
them ? 

"Are our ears deaf, are our hearts callous to the 
voice of justice ? Or are our spirits so weak as ta b 
overcome with fear where no danger is?" 



150 CHRONICLES 

Now many voices of the princes and nobles of 
Gaelen called out, " Where are the Danan to sit ?" - 

And Aongus the brother of the king of Gaden 
said, 

" What if Magn sit on the seat of the king of 
Ulladr 

Now the words were spoken scoffingly. 

And Ardri rose, and said, 

" Even so, when a prince of Er sitteth Ardri, ra- 
ther than say nay to the words of the Danan spoken 
in peace and friendship." 

And when Ardri saw that many were for placing 
the chief and nobles ofOldanmact behind the thione, 
he said, 

" What if of the Danan, the chief, and eight of the 
nobles sit in the assembly of Eri behind the throne, 
and hold talk, and raise up their hands to be 
counted ?" 

And it was so. 

And words were set down on the book of the 
chronicles. 

And the nobles of Oldanmact abided in the tents 
of the king, till they took their departure for the 
land of their dwelling. 

And the assembly did not come together waiting 
the coming of the Danan ; but that was not to be. 
Magn had ceased ere Saorlam had returned to Ol- 
danmact. 

And when the assembly came together, Ardri 
said, 

" Hath one aught.for the ear of the assembly?* 

And all were silent. 

And the words on the roll of the laws, 



OF ERI. 

And on the book of the chronicles were read ; and 
the heralds called aloud, "Stand any on Tobradfor 
justice?'* 

And none answered. 

And the assembly went forth, and the doors of 
the high chamber were closed. 

And Eocaid abided on Tobrad. 



CHAP. X. 

Now contention arose in Oldanmact for the seat of 
the chief, between the brethren and the sons of 
Meirt. It was said to be spoken in that land, that 
Forb and Gost, the brothers of Meirt, sometime chief, 
\vere servants of Ardri, and Meirt the son of Meirt 
was chosen. 

And Ardri sent Fionn a noble of Ullad, with the 
words set on the book of the chronicles concerning 
the chief and nobles of Oldanmact. 

And Meirt did look coldly on Fionn, and Fionn, 
feeling the touch thereof, did return towards Teac- 
mor on the instant. 

And Eocaid moved towards Dun Sobairce; and 
he did take Amaril daughter of Ro&, a prince of 
Ullad. 

All Ullad was at Dun Sobairce; mirth and joy 
filled the hearts of the children of the land. 

And Eocaid dwelled at Dun Sobairce; and he 
hath made circuits of the land at the charge of the 
king. 

And when Eocaid had ruled 0ne score rings and 
two, and the assembly were on the mount of Ullad. 



15'2 CHRONICLES 

And the words on the roll of the laws of'Ullad, 
and of Tainistact, and on the book of the chronicles 
of Ullad, had been read, 

And the heralds had called aloud, " Stand any 
on the mount for justice," 

A voice was heard, saying, 

" Thorad of the Gaal on Magneac desireth to 
stand before the king." 

And Thorad was called, an aged man, yea, very 
aged was he. And Thorad told how Seal, judge of 
Magneac, did read the words of the law without the 
knowledge of Thorad. Will not the king have the 
words of the judgments told against Seal? 

And as the judge of Dun Sobairce was about to 
repeat the words, Eocaid rose, and said, 

" Will man never cease from judging in his own 
cause, yet call out against another therefor ? 

" That Thorad should err what if? the ear of 
Thorad hath not heard lessons of wisdom. That 
Morda hath strayed, is it not to be marvelled at? 

" Thorad complaineth that Seal hath read the 
words of the law in his absence. Is Seal present ? yet 
doth Morda prepare to transgress, as Seal is said to 
have done. 

" Let Morda send a messenger unto the dwelling 
of Seal, with words for the eye of Seal, saying, 

" Let Seal stand on the mount of Ullad, before 
the assembly, out of hand to answer to the complaint 
of Thorad." 

And Eocaid added moreover, 

" This is no small matter ; the assembly will abide 
at Dun Sobairce till the coming of Seal ." ^ 



OF'ERI. 153 

And Seal did come ; and Thorad stood before the 
assembly, and he d'id repeat his words as afore. 
And Eocaid said, 
" Let Seal answer." 

And Seal did answer, " Seal hath transgressed." 
And Eocaid said, " It is written on the roll of 
the laws, 

" Man be merciful. 

' What if the fault of Seal be forgotten in the ful- 
ness of his confession ?" 
And all said, " Yea." 

And Eocaid inquired, " What hath been the loss 
of Thoradr 

And Thorad answered, " Two sheep, and two 
measures of flour." 

And Eocaid said, " Let the chief of Magneac see 
that the matter be heard in the presence of Thorad, 
and Jet right be done." 

And the king added moreover, 
" The words on the roll are not enough touching 
this thing, 

" What if words be added thereunto? 
" Let every tongue be silent before the judge in 
the absence of him that is accused, and if the judge 
transgress, let him sit no more." 
And all said, " Yea." 

And the words on the roll of the laws of Ullad 
were read with the additions. 

And Eocaid and all the assembly moved to Dun 
Sobairce. 

And the boards were spread, and all the Olam of 
Mur domain, and all the youths were bidden, and 
Fionri the son of Eocaid sat amongst the Olam. 



154 CHRONICLES 

And the tales of other times were heard, and the 
voice of the harp. 

And the book of the chronicles was opened, and 
the words were read in the hearing of those assem- 
bled. 

And Eocaid moved towards Teacmor. 

Now Baal had entered into the second chamber 
of his house Tionscnad, and had abided four nights 
therein, 

When a messenger arrived from Mwnain, say- 
ing, " Faille layeth on the bed of sickness." 

And Eocaid said unto me, " Neartan, how sweet 
the voice of friendship to the ear of him that is heal, 
how much more delicious to the ear of him that lan- 
guisheth." 

And on the morrow Eocaid, and Blat the son of 
Ardfear, and I Neartan, did move towards the tents 
of the king of Mumain. 

Failbe did seem to revive at the sight of Eo- 
caid; it was but seeming. Eocaid was pained at 
heart. 

And he did minister unto Failbe without ceasing, 
but nought could stop the progress of the disease. 
He died under the eye of Eocaid on the tenth day, 
having ruled for fourteen rings. 

And Eocaid tarried in the tents of the king of 
Mumain till the heap of Failbe was raised ; but he 
would not see one of the princes of Iber, nor yet of 
the nobles of Mumain; for he said unto me, " Ne- 
artan, the fancy of the bard is not more deceptious 
than the eye of jealousy." 

And when the weight of Failbe was on the bear- 
ers, Eocaid did move step by step thereafter. 



OF ERI. 

And he did raise the death-song, and he did 
speak of the peaceful spirit of Failbe, and of his 
wisdom, and of the constancy in friendship of the 
chief: 

And the many tongues of Mumains harps did 
mingle with the voices of the children of the land, 
giving mournful utterance to the sorrow all did 
feel. 

And when the stone was rolled to the entrance of 
the house of darkness, 

Eocaid said aloud, 

" May the spirit of Failbe abide with the children 
of Mumain for ever!" 

And Eocaid would not be in treated to tarry in 
Mumain, he did move towards Teacmor even in the 
sight of the congregation. 

And Iber the sou of Noid was chosen to rule in 
Mumain. 

And he took Mina the daughter of Roiteasac 
king of Gaelen. 

Now the heart of Eocaid was pained for Eri. 

Iber and Roiteasac were one ; and Meirt had de- 
parted from the way of his fathers ; his mind was 
evil towards Ardri. 

And he did say unto me, " Ntartan, this friend- 
ship of /for and Roiteasac, and the coldness of Meirt, 
to the sons of Er y is as the gathering of a dark cloud 
over Eri. 

" Should the storm arise and the torrent descend, 
how shall the land be preserved from the violence 
thereof? What availeth the ravage from rains and 
winds compared with the havoc by the unruled 



156 CHRONICLES 

passions of man? they are as the raging fire that 
consumed) ail things. 

" The dark gloomy subtlety of the priests of 
Gaelen, and the thoughtless levity of the bards and 
minstrels of Mumain will not suffer Eri to dwell in 
repose. 

" If it could be done that schools were raised up 
durable in Mumain and Gaelen, falsehood would be 
removed to make way for truth. 

" Ignorance would be cast away as a hateful 
poison ; knowledge would be sought as the good 
herb, delicious to the taste, wholesome for the life 
of man. 

" Should Her and Roiteasac draw in Meirt, and 
all rise up against Ullad. 

" What if Eocaid say unto them, Hold thy hands, 
sons of Golam ; raise them not against Eri. 

" Let not man slay his fellow. 

" Eocaid will leave the throne, and abide in Ul- 
lad, 

" How long from that day would Her and Roi- 
teasac live in friendship ? 

" Would not one and the other seek the hand of 
the Danan? 

" What though Ullad should dwell in repose, is 
not Mumain, is not Gaelen, of Eri? Eri will be 
rent; then may it not be said, would it not be said, 
in times to come 

" Neartan, when thou shalt answer, speak in 
words of truth, or be silent Would it not be said, 

" The watchman set to guard the fold, when dan- 
ger drew nigh, did flee with fear? 



OF.ERI. 157 

" Where then would be the glory of Eocaid? how 
long would his spirit endure amongst the children 
of the land after his breath shall cease? 

" Let Neartan speak." 

And 1 said, 

" Eocaid the son of Er will abide with the flock 
to the end." 

And the king replied, 

" When the assembly shall be together in Teac- 
mor, O Failbe, Failbe ! Eocaid doth mourn for the 
loss he hath sustained in thee: he feareth that Eri 
will have cause to lament thou art no more." 

And Eocaid passed on to Ullad, and he called 
the assembly to the mount: 

And when the princes and nobles, and chiefs of 
the Olam, and heads of the people, and the judges 
named, stood around the king, 

Eocaid rose, and said, 

" Peace and harmony are the delight of the spirit 
of Eocaid', howbeit, the souls of others rejoice in 
strife and discord, 

" The mind of Roiteamc inclineth not unto the 
sons of Er. 

" Iber hath called to his memory afresh the death 
of Noid, and the friendship of Eocaid for Failbe. 

" That Meirt turneth away his eye from Ullad, 
Eocaid knoweth not the cause thereof. 

" What though my spirit abhorreth violence, yet 
must Ullad be prepared to strike if aimed at. 

" Let the princes and nobles call together the 
Gaal, to move after the manner of the hunter ; so 
will they become expert in the ways of war without 
feeling the pang thereof." 



158 CHRONICLES 

And Eocaid added, 

" Let the words passed in Magneac be told.'* 

And Doib chief of Magneac stood up, and said, 
" The words spoken against Thorad were not true. 
The flour had been given by the woman of his 
accuser unto the children of her brother, who lay in 
sickness : the sheep was found astray." 

And the king said, 

" Let judges learn from hence the danger of read- 
ing the words of the law hastily." 

And he raised his voice, and said, 

" Ere we go hence, the king hath words for your 
ears : 

" Is man false doth man take of another's sub- 
stance these are transgressions to be atoned for ; 
and if one is accused thereof, and standeth not be- 
fore the justicer and Cluastig to make answer there- 
unto he beareth the shame : methinks that weight is 
heavy enough for such an one. 

" Doth man slay his fellow with evil mind, the 
life taken cannot be restored : moreover,- the one 
stained with blood should not live ; words are want- 
ing on the roll that the slayer answer. 

N What if words be added ? 

" Shall man be said to slay his fellow, let his 
name be called before the justicer whilst he sitteth, 
and in the land of his kindred, and in the congre- 
gation ; and if he answereth not, let him be laid hold 
on, and brought to answer." 

And all said, "Yea." 

And the words were added. 

And the king said, 

" Near tan and the Olam of Dun Sobairce will be 



OF ERI-. 159 

at the house of the king on the morrow, with the 
additions in the book of the chronicles, that the 
words may be read in your ears concerning the 
doings of Eocaid, and the times but passed in Eri." 

And the heralds called aloud, 

** Stand any on the mount for justice?"- And none 
answered. 

And the assembly moved to Dun Sobairce. 

And on the morrow the words, with the additions, 
were read aloud. 

And the princes and nobles moved to the tents 
of their dwellings. 

And they assembled the Gaal, and they spread 
over UUad in the chase. 

The mind of Eocaid is disturbed. 

Now the messengers went forth throughout all 
Eri with letters ; and these are the words thereof: 

" Let the kings, princes, and nobles, and chiefs 
of the Olam, and heads of the people, and the chief 
of the D<wan, with eight nobles of Qldanmact, and 
the judges named, meet Ardri in the high chamber 
of Teacmor on Tobrad, what time the fires shall 
be lighted on the summits of the plains of Eri." 

And when the time came, and the doors of the 
high chamber were opened, Ardri presented his 
right hand unto Meirt, and he conducted him to 
the seat that had been placed for the chief of Oldan- 
mact. 

And the assembly looked on one another with 
wonder, for the throne had been closed on the hinder 
part, with a covering above aforetime: but now the 
frame on the back, -and the covering thereon, were 



160 CHRONICLES 

removed, so that all eyes could see the chiefs and 
nobles of Oldanmact, and hear the words of their 
lips. 

But neither Meirt nor the Danan knew the mean- 
ing thereof at this time. 

And when all were seated, and silence abided, 

The king rose from the throne, and said, 

" What though much time was spent in thinking 
on laws fit for the children of the land ; yet, as 
times pass, occasions will make words to be added. 

" Care was not taken at that time by the assembly 
of the Olam of Eri. What though Olam are in all 
the nations of the Gaol, yet little good hath come 
thereby to the youth of Mumain and of Gaelen; 

" Therefore, 

" What if we hold talk concerning schools du- 
rable through the land when next the assembly shall 
be here together?" 

And all went forth of the high chamber, and the 
boards were spread, and the horns went round to 
excess. 

And the king seated Meirt on his right hand, and 
he did honour unto him; all eyes waited on, all 
hands served the chief and nobles of Oldanmact. 

And as the horns were cleared, the blood of Iber 
grew hot, his tongue ran on the chase, and on the 
battle, and on the glory of the warrior, still direct- 
ing his words to Eocaid: 

When Ardri said, " Wherefore should the Gaal 
of Sciot of Iber move to the battle ? Where are their 
foes ? They will not shed each other's blood ? Are 
not the Danan as our brethren?" 



OF ERI. 161 

Still Her talked of the battle. 

And Eocaid said, 

* My ears have heard the sound of Mumains 
harps : I marvel, that the ear of Iber, used to the 
harmony of their voice, could endure the discord of 
the shrieks of war." 

And as Iber waxed warmer, he said, 

" Idid not think Ardri had heard the tumult of 
war, that he could know the noise thereof. Did 
Eocaid ever hear the sound r" 

And Eocaid, sorrow on his countenance, gen- 
tleness ill his eye, his hand outstretched towards 
Iber, said, " If Iber would forbear." 

But Iber would not. 

And the king rose, and as he went forth, Iber said 
aloud, 

" I marvel the son of Er can move, encumbered 
as he is with such a weight of wisdom." 

And the king was troubled for the times to come, 
and he said unto me, " Near tan, let these things 
stand on the chronicles of the Gaol, they speak the 
mind of Iber. n 

Now the assembly were together in the high cham- 
ber, and Ardri rose and said, 

" Great good hath come to Ullad from the schools; 
great good hath come from Mur Olamain of Teac- 
mor. 

" Reason is the glory of man ; yet how little doth 
he differ from the beast of the field that lacketh re- 
flection, if the portion he hath, receiveth not a right 
direction, as Eolus hath said. 

" Doth not the ship require the hand of the pilot 

VOL. II, 



162 CHRONICLES 

to steer it safe amidst the waves of the mighty sea, 
from the rocks peeping above the head, and on the 
margin thereof? 

" As the pilot is to the ship, and the merchandise 
it containeth, such is the Olam to the mind of youth, 
and the riches concealed therein. 
" Therefore, 

" What if schools durable were builded in Mu- 
main and in Gaelen, and provision made for the Olam 
and for the youth?" 

Ere Ardri sat, a confused murmur ran through 
the assembly ; and Nid chief of Dealb rose and 

said, 

" Is the wisdom of our fathers to pass off as the 

shadow ? Did they not say ? 

" 'Make not houses fixed as in Aoimag ; raise riot 
a desire in the minds of others to possess themselves 
of the fruit of the labour of your hands. Dwell in 
your tents, children of Iber' The sons of Er decline 
from the way of their race." 

And Iber king in Mumain rose, and said, 

" Sobairce and Ciermna, sons of Er, builded 
houses durable; Ardri from Sobairce, hath he not 
builded this Teacmor, and Mur Olamain nigh hens 
unto, and three schools in Ullad to nourish the fire 
of the spirit of the sons of Eri, as he sayeth ; how- 
beit, to my thinking, to smother the flame of the 
warrior, shutting up the youth between walls to 
slumber in peace slothfully. 

" Let Ullad be the care of Eocaid. 

" What if Mur Olamain of Teacmor wfcr<e made 
level with the earth ?" 



OF ERI. 

Whereupon Strat of the Olam of Uttad rose, and 
as he opened his mouth to speak, Earc chief of 
car rose in haste, and said, 

" Are the Olam to speak, O king, before the 
bles of the land ?*' 

And Ardri said, 

" Let the words of the rules of the high chamber 
be read." 

And it was so. 

And Ardri said, " Let us incline our ears to the 
voice of Strat" 

And Strat said, 

" What knoweth man without instruction ? Man 
alone turneth to use the experience of those who 
had lived before. 

" Doth any one think ignorance is preferable to 
wisdom : let no one hear him so say. 

" The fire of Baal in man is the portion of reason 
in that man : it giveth light, it nourisheth ; it is ob- 
scure, or it devoureth, according to the care taken 
thereof. 

" To fan and direct the fire of Baal is the duty of 
the Olam, which if he negJecteth, the same is a trans- 
gressor. 

" Sons o? Iber, set not the hand of violence against 
the walls that contain the food of the spirit of wis- 
dom. Let Strat beseech, whilst he invoketh wis- 
dom in the words of truth, suffer the good work of 
the schools of Eri to proceed : O stay it not !" 

And Iber and Nid held their peace. 

And Eocaid did not say more of the schools at 
that time. 

Now it was noted by all, that the eyes of Iber and 
M 2 



164 CHRONICLES 

Roileasac, yea, and of Meirt, did not look with re- 
gard on Ardri. 

But Eocaid turned not aside from the strait path 
towards the happiness of Eri. 

And the day before tlie assembly were to sepa- 
rate, 

1 The words on the roll of the laws, and on the 
book of the chronicles were read aloud, and they 
were right and good. 

And none abided on Tobrad for justice. 

And the assembly went forth, and the doors of the 
high chamber were closed. 

Ardri abide th on Tobrad* 



CHAP. XI. 

Now Baal passed into his house Slat, and Ardri 
moved towards Dun Sobairce. 

And he made a circuit of Ullad, and he abided 
in the tents of the chiefs, now of one, now of ano- 
ther. 

And he saw the Gaol draw the bow, and wield 
Cran Tubal, and their improvement was great. 

And Ardri bad Ros to go to Tobrad, and to 
abide there ; and he gave him a charge to have an 
eye to Mur Olamain. 

Now words came from friends of Faille, in Mu- 
main, unto Eocaid, saying, 

" Eri will be scorched by the flame of the friend- 
ship of Lber and Meirt, Mumain and Oldanmact 



OF ERI. 165 

are as though the waters of Seanavnan did not glide 
between ; 'twere well the son of Er did quench the 
fire ere it consumeth. 

And Eocaid did send letters to Ogard chief of 
Sithdruim saying, 

" If Ogard would send his words of the doings 
of Jber and of Meirt unto Ros 9 to Teacmor on To- 
brad, and let Ogard be certain ere he sendeth." 

Now Ogard had been the friend of Faille, and 
he had gone with him to Dun Sobairce ; and he did 
think as Failbe in all things ; therefore was he grieved 
for the course that Iber did pursue. 

And Ogard had two friends, stedfast, fearing no 
danger, who had taken damsels in Oir, sisters, and 
the first-born of Feal, of the heads of the people of 
Oir, had sucked the paps of their mother ; and 
Feal was he who did pass between Iber and Meirt. 

And of a time when Feal did go to the tents of 
the chief of Oldanmact with words from Iber ; Breas, 
and Cathluan, so were these young men called, were 
in his company. 

And when they did return to the tents of their 
land, as they were a hunting on a day that Ogard 
did call the Gaal to the chase, they did hap to be 
alone with Ogard, and they had sport; and whilst 
the stones were heating, as they sat upon the heath, 
Ureas did say, 

" Many moons will not change ere the deer of 
Mumain will have rest." 

And Ogard inquired the meaning of his words. 

And Breas told of what he heard in Oldan 
mact* 



166 CHRONICLES 

And Cathluan did avouch his words. 

And Ogard said unto JBreas and unto Cathluan, 

" Ye have ever been the friends of Ogard and his 
race : 

" Return not to your homes till you shall see 
Teacmor, and thither bear words to Ros, a prince 
of Uttad, he dwelleth there; and come from thence 
unto the tents of Ogard, on Sit/idruim" 

And the young men did eat and drink ; and when 
they were refreshed, they moved on their way. 

And they did tell their words in the hearing of 
Ros, and Ros did send unto Mur Olamain, to bid 
Maol of the Olam to come unto him. 

And Ros made Ureas and Cathluan welcome; 
and he gave unto each a bow and a quiver of ar- 
rows, and a sword ; and they returned to their 
place. 

And Ros sent letters unto Eocaid of all these 
things ; and he added, " The warriors of Mumain 
and of Oldanmact will be on Tobrad to seat I her on 
the throne of Eri, what time Baal shall enter the 
inoon of his blessed fire." 

Now Baal had not departed from his house Cru- 
inning. 

And Eocaid called chiefs and heads of the people 
one by one to Dun Sobairce^ and he spoke to each 
separately, saying, 

" Rouse the Gaal, put them to hardship ; the 
ways of war are rough. Still keep them in the cir- 
cles ; let them chase the deer over the hills and 
plains of Ulhd. 

" Let them make strong their arms and bodies by 



OF ERI. 167 

custom: let the bards and the minstrels temper their 
spirits. Ullad, gentle in peace, must be terrible in 
the battle." 

And Eocaid abided in Ullad, making preparations 
to ward off the blow that threatens Eri. 

And he did change the custom of other times. 

To the princes of Er he said, " Stand round the 
king. Let the chiefs lead the warriors of their 
land, and the heads of the people will move with 
the clan. 

" The voice of mildness ofttimes hath been mis 
taken by the ignorant for weakness of the spirit." 

Now messengers were sent forth throughout -JSri, 
saying, 

" Let the assembly of Eri be together in the high 
chamber of Teacmor on Tobrad what time Baal 
move into his house Tionscnad" 

And the messengers added moreover, 

" Ardri hath words for the ears of the children of 
the land." 

And when the assembly were together, 

Ardri rose and said, 

" The king set to watch over Eri hath words for 
the kings, and princes, and nobles, and those who 
sit here for the Gaal, that will bring some to shame, 
some they will affright, and amaze all ; till then, let 
even the semblance of harmony be seen on To- 
brad." 

And the feasts were prepared, and the song, and 
the voice of the harps were heard, and the tales of 
other times, and the dance, and sports various more 
than theretofore : 

But care was seen sitting thoughtfully on the 



168 CHRONICLES 

brow of Eocaid, between the smiles beneath whicn 
he sought to conceal him. 

And when the doors of the high chamber were 
opened, and the assembly were on their seats, 

Ardri rose and said, 

" Hath not Maol of the Olam of Teacmor words 
for the ears of Eri?" 

And Maol stood up, and he did say, 

" What hath come to the ear of Maol concerning 
Eri, and fit to be told, is soon said. 

" What if a son of the hero make covenant with 
the Danan, to spill the blood of the Gaal, and waste 
the land ? 

" If Iber king in Mumain hath not done this 
thing, a false tale is spread of him. 

" If Meirt chief of Oldanmact hath not been con- 
senting unto Iber, evil tongues have been busy with 
his name." 

And Iber rose with warmth, and he said, 

" Hath Iber desire for the friendship of Meirt, 
what if 

" Are these the words that have called together 
out of season the kings, and princes, and nobles of 
the land to the summit of Tobrad? What nice yet 
open ears Ardri must have to suck such subtle poi- 
son to his brain." 

And Maol rose and said, 

" Let Maol speak more plainly. 

" If Iber said not unto Meirt in this wise : 

" Meirt; help Iber to the throne of Eri> Oldan- 
mact shall be free of tribute, whilst sun. moon, and 
stars endure, and a son of Iber keepeth the seat of 
Ardri 



OF ERI. 



169 



" And if Meirt did not answer unto Iber, and 
say, 

" Meirt will help Iber, as Iber hath spoken. 

" Then the words of Breas and of Cathluan, which 
they spake in the hearing of Maol, are false ; and 
that they spake the words in MaoFs ear, Maol doth 
take the sun, the moon, and stars, to be his wit 
nesses." 

And Maol added moreover, 

u If Breas and Catltluan now were called." 

And the heralds from without called the names 
of Breas and of Cathluan. 

And they did stand before the assembly. 

And the chief secretary did repeat the words of 
Maol in the hearing of Breas and Cathluan. 

And Ardri rose and said, 

" Let Suil of the judges inquire." 

And Suil rose and said, 

" Breas and Cathluan have heard the words of 
Maol; Iber king of Afumain, and Meirt chief of Ol- 
danmact, listening thereunto. 

" What say Breas and Cathluan 1" 
And Breas and Cathluan turned their faces to- 
wards the sun's rising; and they raised up their 
right hands, and they called upon the sun, moon, 
and stars: moreover Cathluan invoked the spirit of 
his father. 

And both swore, 

That they did pass in company with Feal of the 
heads of the Gaol in Oir, to the tents of the chief of 
Oldanmact : 

And that Feal did say unto Meirt, words from 
Iber, king of Mumain, as Fail said. 



170 CHRONICLES 

" Meirt; help Iber to the seat of Ardri, aud Ol- 
danmact shall be free of tribute for evermore. 

" And Meirt did answer unto Feed, 

" Even so." 

And Ardri rose and said, 

" These are words of Feal. What did these men 
hear from the lips of Iber?" 

And they did answer, " None." 

And Has, a prince of Ullad, rose and said, 

" What if Feal were bidden ?" 

And Ardri rose and said, 

" Iber will not, nor will Meirt, deny any words 
they may have spoken : 

"What if Iber and Meirt were heard ?'' 

And Eocaid added moreover, 

" This toucheth the king his very self. Let no man 
judge in his own cause. Let the assembly hold 
talk." 

And Ardri loosed his mantle, and he took the 
asion from off his head, and he laid them on the 
throne, and he \vent forth of the high chamber, and 
he rode to Mur Olamain, and abided there till the 
even. 

And when he returned to the tents of the king 
on Tobrad, the assembly were yet together, and 
much contention arose in the high chamber ; for Iber 
said, 

" When the seat of Ardri is empty, hath not a 
son of Iber as fair a title thereto as another of the 
race?" 

But Iber avouched not the words of Feal. 

When Meirt came from behind the throne, and he 
did stand in the midst, and Jl/itrtdid say, 



OF ERI. 171 

" On a day came Iber to the tents of Meirt, and 
he did say, 

" Let Meirt help Iber to the throne of JEri, and 
Oldanmact shall be free of tribute whilst sun, moon, 
and stars endure. 

" And Meirt answered unto Iber, 

" So be it. 

" And since that day came Feal to Oldanmact 
with words like unto the words of Iber. 

" And last did Feal speak again in the hearing of 
these men in like sort, as from the lips of Iber. 

" Let the warriors of Oldanmact be prepared to 
join themselves to the host of Mumain, what time 
Baal shall abide in the mansion of his blessed fire ; 
then shall Eocaid have leisure to sit in the schools 
wisely ; any noise but the cackling of the teachers 
stunneth Ardri" 

Now it was known that the king was in his tent 
on Tobrad, and Near tan rose and said, 

" What if Ardri was called to the throne ?" 

And voices said, " Yea." 

And the heralds went forth, and Eocaid returned 
with them, and he took his seat on the throne. 

And Suil repeated to the king the words of Iber, 
and the words of Meirt: howbeit all the words spo- 
ken that were as gusts of wind, he told not of. 

And Ardri said, 

" What saith the king of Gaelen 1" 

But Roiteasac was silent. 

When Miolis chief in Ardtain rose, and said, 

" Shall Iber cease to rule in Mumain? 

" Shall the tribute of Oldanmact be trebled, and 



172 CHRONICLES 

the Danan abide on the far side of the waters of 
Seanaman for ever ?" 

And some said one thing, some said another, 

Yet was the king silent. 

At length all the assembly stood up, and as with 
one voice, said aloud, 

" If Ardri would speak." 

And the king rose, and he did say, 

"Iber hath denied the words ofFeal for his. May 
it riot be that Feal understood not the king of 
Mumain ? 

" What though Meirt hath exposed the mind of 
Iber, and Iber hath once said what he now revok- 
eth ; let it be thought the weight of his grossness 
lay too heavily on the purity of his spirit at that time, 
and that now shame doth oppress him. Lo Iber 
grieved at heart! 

" What if the words of Iber be scattered abroad 
in air, never more to be recollected, if Iber never 
more forget himself?" 

And Eocaid came down from the throne, and he 
moved towards Iber, and he said, " Are we not 
brethren, children ofGolam, sons of Iber and of Er? 
Should strife be between us, or our children, or our 
children's children? 

" Let us move together in the path of glory, in 
the ways of wisdom, for the good of Eri ?" 

And Eocaid reached the hand of friendship to- 
wards Iber, and Iber pressed the hand of Eocaid to 
his heart. 

The king of Mumain strove to hide the tears of 
Iber, but the heart of Iber was too full. 

And Ardri returned to the throne, and he said, 



OP ERI. 173 

" Who that payeth tribute would not rid himself 
therefrom ? 

" Jfetrlhiath committed no transgression? 

" What if the chief of Oldanmact, and eight of the 
nobles come on this side the Seanaman, and sit even 
here, 

" Are the sons of Eri affeard to speak the words 
of their thoughts in the hearing of the Danan ? 

" Let the breath of Breas and of Cathluan mingle 
with the winds, lost for ever, our thanks, retained. 

" Was Fail in hearing of Eocaid y Eocaid would 
say, 

" Friendship, or what he hath mistaken for friend- 
ship for Iber, hath exceeded the duty that he owed 
to Eri. Few words remain." 

And Eocaid came down from the throne, and 
he moved to the seat of the king of Ullad, and he 
said, 

" The seat of Ardri is now empty ; let the kings 
and princes, and nobles say, with the voice of har- 
mony in words of peace, 

" Who shall sit on the throne of Eri ARDRI ?" 

And Iber and Roiteasac rose and hasted towards 
Eocaid ; and Iber did take the right hand, and Roi- 
teasac did take the left hand of Eocaid, and Meirt 
did move to meet them as they conducted Eocaid to 
the throne, and they seated him thereon. 

And Iber still standing nigh thereunto, said, 

" Long may Eocaid the son of Fiaca, of the race 
of Er, son of the hero, rule Ardri, for the glory of 
Eri, and the happiness of the GaalT 

And all the assembly rose up, and they presented 
their hands towards Eocaid. 



174 CHRONICLES 

And Maol said, 

"Truth and justice and wisdom move with the 
king in all his ways." 

The words were repeated by every tongue. 

And the assembly went forth of the high chamber, 
and the doors thereof were closed. 

And Eocaid suffered not the kings, princes, and 
nobles, and Olam, and heads of the people, and all 
who were round about Tobrad, to depart for nine 
days, feasting and sporting continually. 

The countenance of Her smileth on Eocaid, the 
eye of Meirt looketh on Ardri with a look of affec- 
tion, peace is on every side. 

The heart of Eocaid is rejoiced. 

The king said unto Near tan, 

" Let all these things be set down on the book 
of the chronicles of Ullad, as also on the chronicles 
of Erir 

And Eocaid moved towards Dun Sobairce, leav- 
ing Ros on Tobrad, and he made a circuit of Ullad. 

And what time Baal entered his house Blat, 
Eocaid took his departure for Teacmor, Fionn his 
first-born in his company, Fionn the son of Tat- 
la, of Fodla of the Gaol of Geintir ; and the child 
was fair, yea, very fair, therefore was he called 
Fionn. 

And he was like unto his father in all his ways. 

And Eocaid sent letters unto Iber, saying, 

" Fionn the son of Eocaid hath desire to go to 
the dwelling of the king of Mumain, that he may 
know Iber, and the princes of his race, and the 
nobles of that land.*' 

And Aongus and Lore princes of lber y and nobles 



OF ERI. 175 

of Mumam, and many horsemen, came to Teacmor, 
with letters from Iber unto Eocaid, saying, 

" Iber sendeth of his kindred to be companions of 
the way of Fionn the son of the king unto the tents 
of Iber." 

J re Fionn took his departure, Eocaid said unto 
him in the hearing of Neartan, 

" My son, 

" Let none approach too nigh unto thee, lest thou 
feel pain in putting him farther off. 

" Bear in thy mind continually the sayings of our 
wise men: man hath two eyes, two ears, two nostrils, 
one score fingers on his hands and feet, yet but 
one tongue, to warn him that he should see and 
hear and feel e'en ten times more than he should 
speak. 

" When mirth and joy prevail, gravity and wis- 
dom are out of time. In Mumain all is sport, arid 
dance, and song, and music, and the chase, and 
drink: whilst thou abidest be as of Mumain, all but 
the last. 

" Beware of strong drink, my son. 

" It lifteth high, yea, very high; it abaseth law, 
yea, very low the spirit of man ; it is the foe of rea- 
son, the poison of man's life." 

And Fionn took his departure for Mwftain. 



176 CHRONICLES 



CHAP. XII. 

Now Eri is in repose. 

And when the assembly was together in the high 
chamber of Teacmor on Tobrad, Ardri rose, and 
said, 

" When the sports shall end, the king hath whereof 
to speak concerning him that is accused, that words 
may be added to the words on the roll of the laws of 
Eri if thought good." 

And the boards were spread, and great was the 
joy of all. 

And when the assembly were gathered together 
in the high chamber, 

Ardri rose and said, 

" It hath happed, and therefore may hap again, as 
in Ullad, that the judge pass to the law in the ab- 
sence of him that is accused. 

" Therefore, what if every tongue be silent before 
the judge in the absence of the accused, and if the 
judge act corruptly, let him not sit again." 

And all said, " Yea." 

And the king said, 

" What if one be accused of slaying his fellow 
with evil mind, and his name be called before the 
judge whilst he is on the seat, on the land of his dwel- 
ling, and in the congregation, three times in each, that 
is nine times in the whole, and he answereth not. 

" Let such a one be laid hold of, and brought to 
answer." 

And all said, " Yea." 

" What if in times to come one be accused qfaught 



OF ERI. 177 

save the slaying of his fellow with evil mind, and 
that only, and his name be called before the judge, 
and on the land of his dwelling, and in the congre- 
gation, and he answereth not, great sickness alone 
excepted. 

" Let such one be put to shame, and shew not his 
face before the judge and the Cluastig, against ano 
ther, till restitution made. 

And all said, Yea." 

And the words were added to the words on the 
roll of the laws of ErL 

And on the morrow Ardri rose, and said, 

" The calm of peace rests on Eri. The Gaol in- 
crease ; food for the life of man is in abundance ; the 
king knoweth of no cause of complaint through the 
land. 

" None shall depart for nine days to come, to the 
land of their dwellings. 

" What if the words of the roll of the laws, 

" And the writings of Eolus, and the book of the 
chronicles, be read aloud on the mount, in the hear- 
ing of the congregation ?' 

And the words of Ardri were good. 

None abided on Tobrad for justice. 

And the doors of the high chamber were closed. 

Eocaid is in the fulness of joy, mirth and gladness 
abound; and the king had all the Olam, and all the 
youths of Mur Olamain at the feasts, day after day, 
that they may hear the writings read, and be de- 
lighted with the song, and music, and the dance, 
and unbend their minds, whilst listening to the tales 
of times gone by. 

VOL. II. N 



178 CHRONICLES 

And the assembly took their departure from TV 
brad. 

Now Feargus was feeble in his body, and he said 
unto Eocaid, if Feargus could abide in Tobrad with 
the king till Baal shall take an higher course ;" 

And Eocaid answered, " Nay. Feargus can re- 
main in Teacmor ; what a king may not, he that 
standeth distantly from the throne may do free from 
the censure of the envious tongue ; moreover infir- 
mity doth modestly claim indulgence, which none 
would be thought to disallow." 

And Eocaid moved towards Dun Sobairce, and 
Feargus remained on Tobrad, dwelling in the cham- 
bers of Teacmor^ 

Nought is seen, nought is heard on the hills and 
in the vales of Uttad but mirth and joy. 

And Eocaid goeth through the land, and he look- 
eth into the condition of the people. 

And he called not together the assembly to the 
mount of Ullad till Fionn his son should come to the 
age. 

And when the time was at hand, messengers were 
sent forth with letters, saying, 

" Let the princes and nobles meet the king on the 
mount, what time Baal shall enter the threshold of 
his house larsgith ;" and words were added more- 
over, 

" Tents will be raised, and the boards spread for 
the Goal round about Dun Sobairce, Fionn the son 
of Eocaid is of the age." 

And when the day came, and the assembly of the 
nobles were together, in the presence of the thou- 



OF ERI. 179 

sands of Ullad, Eocaid took his seat, and Feargus 
stood beside the seat nigh unto the seat of the king. 

And Eocaid rose, and said, 

" Fionn my son is now of the age, he standeth 
here perfect, fit to sit in the place of the king in Ullad. 

" Feargus hath fulfilled my hope in him, he is dear 
to the children of the land, and to the king. 

" Fionn will sit for the king in Ullad, Feargus 
assisting with the strength of his wisdom the weak- 
ness of the inexperience of Rig Diamna." (a) 

Then turning his face towards Fionn, he said, 

" My son, hear the words of thy father, which he 
speaketh in the hearing of the children of the land. 

" Go not from the words of the laws to the right 
hand nor to the left, they will be a sure guide for thy 
foot on the way it ought to move. 

" And if one transgress not with an evil mind, yet 
hath transgressed, and the thing come to thy ear, 
raise thy voice for such an one in pity and in mercy, 
remember man's infirmity, rigour doth make callous 
the heart which tenderness would rnelt to love and 
gentleness. 

" Enter into the schools, still respect the teachers 
of wisdom, they mould the minds of the youth. 

" Curb the priests. 

" Suffer not the justicers to spread out the roll of 
the law till the Cluastig have spoken in the hearing 
of the accused. 

" Bear in mind continually that thou art as the 
shepherd to whom the flock is committed, be not as 
the wolf that breaketh into the fold. 

" Sit thou on the seat of thy father in Ullad, admi- 
nistering justice in mercy." 



180 CHRONICLES 

And raising his voice, his hands outstretched, he 
said, 

" Princes, nobles, Gaal of Ullad, 

" Should Fionn turn aside from the way he ought 
to move, the ear of the king will be open to the 
voice of complaint, and his mind disposed to correct 
the vices of his son." 

And all the people shouted, 

" Haal prosper all the works of the king !" 

And none stood on the mount for justice. 

And the assembly, and who listed moved to Dun 
Sobairce, so great a multitude was not together in 
Ullad aforetime. 

And night and day for nine days and nights were 
as one time at. Dun Sobairce. 

And the king took his departure for Teacmor, and 
he maketh Mur Olam his care, and his boast, and his 
glory. , 

Now before the assembly of Eri were together 
Roiteasac king of Gaelen came to the tents of Ar- 
dri on Tobrad, and he said unto him, "The priests 
are not bidden to the house of the king." 

And Eocaid answered, 

" The tents of Ardri are open continually to all 
the children of the land. Are not the priests of 
EriT' 

And when the assembly were together, Roiteasac 
rose, and said, 

" Roiteasac hath words for the ears of the assem- 
bly concerning the priests." 

And the feasts were prepared, and the priests 
flocked to the table of the king, and Eocaid paid 
respect unto them. 



OF ERI. 181 

Arid when the assembly were in the high cham- 
ber, 

The king of Gaelen rose, and said, 

" The Olam sit and speak, and hold up their 
right hand in the high chamber; 

" The judges take their seats amongst us; 

" The Danan are companions of the kings and 
princes and nobles of Eri ; 

" And the high-priest, who sitteth on the seat of 
Amergein, a prince of the race, the son of the hero ; 
and the priests, who know the secrets of Baal, the 
guardians of the ever-during fire, shall they not 
enter? 

" What if Ard Cruimtear, and nine of the Cruim- 
tear from each of the nations of the Gaol, sit and 
hold talk, and have their hands counted in the high 
chamber of Teacmor? 
. And the assembly held talk: 

And they spake diversly. But the Olam,. nor 
the Danan, nor the king, said lught. 

And Roiteasac said, 

" If Ardri would utter his thoughts ? n 

Whereupon Eocaid rose, and said, 

" Eocaid had purposed to be silent; yet, as the 
king of Gaelen hath desired he will utter his thoughts. 

" Is there lack of wisdom here ? Should our spirit 
need a right direction, are not the chiefs of the Olam 
present ? 

" When talk is of the laws, are not the judges 
with us? 

" Is the tale of Cromcruad and Lulan, in the 
days of Tighernmas, forgotten? 

'* Hath it vanished from our minds how Eacon 



182 CHRONICLES 

but now sought to cas* the lots for the seats of the 
chiefs ? 

" What secrets of Baal doth any man know? 

" For what purpose should priests enter into the 
high chamber? Have they not duties of their own to 
perform ? 

" The office of the priests is to guard the fires, to 
guide the foot of the wayfaring one in the darkness 
of the night ; 

" And to note the seasons 

* These things are not confined to walls. 

" Is it not written in the roll of the laws, 

" Let not the priest enter into the high chamber 
of Teacmor for ever ? 

" Were these words written without thought? 
What cause that they be now blotted out, or other 
words written? 

" Suffer the priests to sit in the assembly of Eri. 
Short will be the time till no places will be for the 
uobles of the land. 

" The assembly will decide ; for Ardri he saith, 

" Let the words stand as they stand on the roll 
of the laws." 

And it was so. 

And the assembly remained together on Tobrad 
in joy and harmony. 

And the day before they were to separate, 

The roll of the laws was spread out : 

And the words were read. 

And the book of the chronicles was opened, and 
the writings were repeated, 

And they were right and good. 

None stood for justice on Tobrad. 



OF ERI. 183 

And the assembly went forth, and the doors of 
the high chamber were closed. 

(a} Rig Diamna means literally materials for a king. It was the 
term or title of an heir-apparent to a crown. 



CHAP. XIII. 

IBER king of Mumain did not return to his own 
land, he went with Fionn to Dun Sobairce. 

And he saw Fiona, the beautiful daughter of 
JEocaid. 

And Iber took Fiona, and she did go with him to 
Mumain. 

And when Eocaid had ruled one score and thir- 
teen rings, Roiteasac died : having eaten honey, he 
was pained in his entrails ; and ere the thistles 
were gathered and made ready, he was passed all 
cure having ruled one score and seven rings. 

And Aongus his son was chosen. 

And Aongus took Dearbel the daughter of Fear- 
qus prince of Ullad. 

And Eocaid said unto me, " Neartan, the happi- 
ness of thy friend is now complete the peace of 
Eri is confirmed." 

Eocaid abideth on Tobrad. 

And when Baal entered larsgith, the king moved 
towards Ullad. 

And he tarried in Ullad but one moon : all the 
ways of Fionn were ways of justice; and the heart 
of Eocaid is comforted. 

Now Baal was nigh unto his house Blat, and 



184 CHRONICLES 

Eocaid cook his departure for Teacmor for the tents 
of Iber : 

And from thence he passed to the tents of Aon- 
gus: 

And what time Baal was in larsgilh, he was on 
Dun Sobairce. 

And when Baal had passed through Meas, the 
king was at the dwelling of Meir.t. 

And he returned to Teacmor, and abidcth in the 
tent. 

Time sitteth lightly on Eocaid; he delighteth in 
the Olam; he doth also take delight in the tale of 
the bard and the song, and music and the dance, 
and he goeth to the chase as the hunter in the vigour 
of youth. 

And Eocaid said unto me " Neartan, go tho'u to 
Dun Sobairce, and abide with the Olam of the 
schools, and see after the youth; and when larsgith 
shall receive the presence of Baal, Eocaid will be in 
Ullad? 

And Eocaid did embrace Neartau, calling him his 
partner, instructor, and friend. 

The presence of Nearian was of no avail : the 
Olam were not negligent in aught. Fionn is provi- 
dent in all things. 

Now Eocaid is in Ullad. 

And the assembly was on. the mount; and so 
great was the content through the land, that neither 
Eocaid nor Fionn had whereof to say, but to speak 
their joy. 

And the words on the roll of the laws, 

And the words of Eolus the wise, 

And of the book of the chronicles, were read. 



OF ERI. 185 

And when the heralds called aloud, 

" Stand any on the mount for justice?" a voice 
was heard, saying, 

" Nida 9 the mother of the children of Imtad, now 
no more, of the Gaal, in Aoimag, hath words for 
the ear of EocaitL* 

And the words were repeated within, and the 
king said, 

" Let Nida enter." 

And Nida stood before the king, and she said, 

" Doil chief of Aoimag, now moons one half a 
score, hath ceased, and Imtad had been gone from 
Nida, and her little ones, four moons before that 
day, and so partition came : and when the head and 
all the clan did stand upon the hill, what though the 
spirit of Jmtad looked down, his form lays moulder- 
ing, his foot no longer treads the ground, his voice 
no more is heard, therefore are Nida and her help- 
less bairns destitute, save of their hope in the good- 
ness of the king." 

And the king said, 

" Of whom doth Nida make complaint?" 

And Nida said, 

" Nida knoweth not. The king, who knoweth 
all things else, doth he not know him who hath 
done the wrong, when Nida tells, partition came, 
and the brethren of Imtad have his land, and Nida 
and the children of Imtad and Nida Iiuve no part 
therein r" 

And the king said, " Who is head of the clan of 
Imtad r 

And Nida answered, 

" Neind. There he i " 



186 CHRONICLES 

And the king said, 

" Let Neirid speak." 

And Neirid stood up, and he did say, 

" The children of Imtad are all young; what 
greater portion can Nida have than widows afore- 
time ?" 

And Nida said, 

" Nida hath not land whereon to set her foot ; 
her kine do feed abroad for half their milk." 

And the king said, 

" Let Terid the son of Doil, chief in Aormag, 
and Neirid, inquire and look to this." And the king 
added, 

" The rule of Tainistact toucheth not this and 
such like ; it is of custom ; and custom good at time, 
is bad for times : 

* Methinks the rings are many and above, as ex- 
perience teacheth, till partition cornes. The Gaol 
increase, the earth bringeth forth the means for the 
life of man ; shall any that breathe the air be denied 
a portion of the land ? else, can he live ? 

" By Tainistact from custom, the widow of the 
dead, leaving no child, doth depart to the dwelling 
of her father's land, taking one-third part of all the 
flock. The widow who did children bear, and 
those in youth, what day partition came, hath had 
one-third of a man's share, and so whilst the then 
chief doth live : this is too long a course; 

" What if the custom bide, as to the widow who, 
bereft of man, hath got no charge to watch and 
rear ?" 

And all said, " Yea." 

And the king said, 



OF ERI. 187 

" What if the woman \vho hath lost her prop, and 
all the burden of his children hath to sustain, shall 
retain the portion her elected had in full until par- 
tition came; and let partition be what time Tion- 
scnad shall feel the spirit of Baal a ring in four." 
And all said, " Yea." 

" So may the lone one have some little store of 
kine for time to come. 

" Let it ne'er be said, the widow was forgotten 
in the land. 

" Nay, more ; it ofttimes haps a tender brood hath 
lost the father and the mother too : what if the 
next of kin do take and rear them up, and have al- 
lowance made? 

" Let all the tribe be guardians to the orphan in 
its days of youth, the tender orphan, deprived of the 
fond mother's care, a father's strength." 
And all said, " Yea," 

" As for Nida, on inquest made let right be 
done according to the custom ; evil though it be of 
time afore." 

And the king added moreover, 
" What if the custom of Tainistact be in this wise 
changed ?" 

And it was so. 

And the assembly moved to Dun Sobairce. 
And in nine days Eocaid took his departure for 
Teacmor. 

Now the time came when the kings, and princes, 
and nobles, and chiefs of the Olam, and the heads of 
the people, and judges named, and the chief, and 
eight of the nobles of Oldanmact, were together in 
the high chamber of Teacmor on Tvbrad. 



188 CHRONICLES 

And Ardri rose and said, 

" Peace abideth through Eri, the youth improve 
in knowledge, the kings, and princes, and nobles, 
respect the laws ; the heads of the people oppress 
not the Gaal, the Gaal are content. 

" Oldanmact is as one of the nations of the Gaal in 
Eri. 

" The king hath no words other than these for 
the ear of the assembly." 

And Meirt rose behind the throne, and said, 

" Meirt hath words for the kings, and princes, 
and nobles of Eri, 

" When the doors of the high chamber shall next 
be opened, touching Ardri" 

And the assembly went forth, and the boards were 
spread. 

And all marvelled at the words of Meirt, what 
manner of thing it was he had to say concerning the 
king. 

And when the doors of Teacmor were opened, 
and the assembly were together, 

Meirt rose and said, 

" Words are on the book of the chronicles of Eri, 
Let the chief of the Danan hold talk in the high 
chamber of Teacmor on Tobrad. 

" Therefore let Eri hear the words of Meirt, say- 
ing* 

" What if a prince of the race of Er sit on the 

throne Ardri for ever ?" 

Now amazement sat on the assembly ; 

One raised not his voice : awhile Eocaid rose 
and said, 

" Meirt knoweth, all who hear the words of the 



OF ERI. 

Hps of Eocaid, know if this thing, or aught like unto 
it, hath at any time proceeded from him. 

" One score and twelve rings have been completed 
since Eocaid the son of Fiaca was placed on this 
seat, by the voice of the kings, princes, and nobles 
of the land; since which day Eri hath dwelt in 
peace. 

" When talk is of such a matter, Eocaid must be 
aosent : 

" Ere he goeth forth, one thing he will say, 

" If it shall seem good to the kings, and princes, 
and nobles, that the sons of Er shall sit above their 
fellows even here, 

" Let the custom of Tainistact abide, and Ardri 
be chosen by the kings, princes, and nobles ; so 
may his youthful ear escape the venom of falsehood, 
and be strengthened against the poison of flattery, 
that consumeth the spirit of man." 

And the princes and nobles held talk ; but neither 
Iber nor Aongus said aught. 

And when all were seated, the chief secretary 
said aloud, 

" Let the heralds attend the steps of Ardri" 

And Eocaid stood before the throne, and said, 

" Let the chief secretary speak." 

And the chief secretary said, 

" Let the right hands be raised up." 

And the right hands were raised up, fourscore 
hands, lacking three, and the heads were numbered 
one score heads, lacking one. 

And the chief secretary said, 
Shall it te according to the rule of Tainistact, 



190 CHRONICLES 

that a prince of the race of Er be chosen Ardri by 
the kings, princes, and nobles of Eri for ever?" 

And all whose desire was towards Eocaid turned 
their faces towards the sun's rising, and held up 
their right hands, and swore by the sun, moon, and 
all the stars, that a son of Er should sit on the 
throne of Eri for ever under the law. 

And the assembly went forth, but Eocaid suffered 
them not to depart whilst Baal abided in Flnicim. 

Then the doors of the high chamber were opened, 
and the roll of the laws was spread out, and the 
book of the chronicles was opened, and the writings 
were read. 

None abided on Tobrad for justice. 

And the doors of the high chamber were closed. 



CHAP. XIV. 

EOCAID abideth on Tobrad. 

Peace and contentment are throughout the nations 
of Eri. 

The king hath gone towards Dun Sobairce ring 
r.fter ring what time Baal entereth the threshold of 
his house larsgith. 

Now when he had ruled in Ullad two score 
rings, 

And the messengers had gone forth to call the 
assembly of Eri to Tobrad, he sent to Fionn his son 
to come unto him. 

And when Fionn was about to return to Dun 
Sobairce, Eocaid said unto him, " Tarry here with 



OF ERI. 191 

me till larsgith, then return to Ullad, and I will 
go with thee." 

And as Baal was entering larsgith, the king 
took his departure from his tents on Tobrad, with 
Fionn his son, and I Neartan was with the king. 

And Eocaid would go by the way of Mur Olam- 
ain, to see the youths, and to give a charge con- 
cerning them. 

And when it was known that the king purposed 
to take that way, a great multitude accompanied 
him, and a train of damsels came forth to do ho- 
nour unto the king. 

And Eocaid went unto Mur Olamain, and he 
tarried there for a while; and as he moved towards 
the river, one came unto the king, and said, 

" Youths of Gaelen have desired to race on their 
horses before the king." 

And Eocaid was conducted to a little hill, whence 
he could look over the way the horses were to run, 
and all the damsels came about him. 

And as the horses were changing their course to 
go by the waters of the JBuadaman, the horse of one 
of the young men ran headlong into the river, and 
the youth was flung, and he sunk to the ground, 
and he lay there. 

And a great uproar, and loud lamentation were 
raised ; and when one of the damsels nigh unto the 
king heard what had happed, and that the youth 
covered over by the waters was Caoilt the son of 
Deag, chief minstrel of the king, 

She ran violently towards the river, and threw 
herself into the waters; 

And what time the boats came, and the ropes 



192 CHRONICLES 

were brought, the young man and the damsel were 
in the arms of death. 

And a loud cry was raised, and Eocaid lamented, 
and the company bare the weight of the lad and 
of the damsel to a chamber of Mur Olamain. 

And the king did not go on his way, he lodged in 
the chamber of the Ard Olam till the little heap was 
raised. The cloth of death that covered the young 
man did also cover the damsel ; they were laid side 
by side; the heap of one is the heap of the other, 
and the name of the damsel was Dutama. 

Is not the mournful song of the bards for the 
death of Caoilt and Dutama amongst the writings 
of the bards in Mur Olamain ? 

And when it was known that the king did not 
touch Ullad, on the first of the days of larsgith, 
the priests said it was a sign from Baal that he would 
not return to Tmcmor. 

And on the day after the king reached Dun So- 
bairce, he went to Mur Olamain, and he heard the 
youths hold discourse; and joy was spread over his 
countenance, and he said aloud, 

" Was the spirit of all the youth of Eri nourished 
in this sort, how happy would the children of the 
land be, how great the glory of the king !" 

And he inquired if Fionn his son ofttimes entered 
Mur Olamain. 

And the Olam answered, " Yea." 

And Eocaid said, " It is good. If kings, princes, 
and nobles have wisdom, the Gaol will dwell in 
peace, content, and happiness." 

And whilst Eocaid abided yet seven days at Dun 
Sobairce, 



OF ERI. 193 

Two of the priests came thither with words from 
Ard Cruimtear of Gaelen, and after sojourning one 
day at Dun Sobairce, they returned towards the 
south country. 

They had not gone more than two days travel, 
when the king was pained in his head, in his back, 
and in all his joints, and he became worse and 
worse. 

And when the physician of the king made inquiry 
of the servant of the sleeping chamber, (it was there, 
as he awoke, that pains came on him,) the man 
said, 

" The priests of Gaelen brought a present of fur- 
niture for the bed of the king. 

" And one of the priests said unto me, 

" If the king inquire, Why hath the apparel been 
changed ? say thou, The friend of the king honoreth 
the king." 

And Eocaid was raised from his bed, and he was 
borne unto another chamber, and the apparel was 
removed on which he had lain, and lol it was the 
skin of a beast of the sea, and it was heavy with 
moisture. 

And it, and the covering over the king were spread 
before the fire, and vapour issued therefrom, as smoke 
of smothered embers. 

And Fionn inquired of his father, if it was known 
unto him that the priests of Gaelen had brought 
aught unto him ? 

And he answered, " Nay :" then the thing was 
told unto him. 

And Taltan bad, Let water be fetched up from 
the sea; and it was so: and it was warmed by fire,, 

VOL. II. O 






194 CHRONICLES 

and the king was placed in the water : and when 
he was borne thence, he was wrapped in wool, aired 
before the fire; and when thirst came on him, he was 
given water from the spring to drink. 

And when Taltan felt that the skin of the king 
was dry and hot, and no moisture thereon, he 
smote his breast, and wrung his hands, and cried 
aloud. 

Whereupon Eocaid said, 

" Let my sons Fionn and Eocaid be called, and 
let words be sent to Mur Olamain, that Neartan and 
Muinid come hither, and with them Ardfear and 
Cairbre my sons." 

And when Neartan and Muinid were in the cham- 
ber where the king was lying. Ardfear and Cairbre 
in our hands, 

Fionn and Eocaid with Taltan stood beside the 
bed; 

And the face of the king was turned away from 
them. 

And when the door was opened, he strove to turn 
his body, but could not : and he called upon Taltan 
to move him. 

And he looked on us; and when he saw our faces 
steeped in sorrow, he smiled how lovely the smile 
of Eocaid! 

And he said, 

" Why be ye sorrowful, my friends ? Who what 
that hath been produced, that hath not ceased? 

" Three sccre and eight rings have I been on the 
earth in peace, save the one day on which NoidM\ t 
no fault of mine. 

" Of that time I have sat two score rings on the 



OF ERI. 195 

seat of my fathers in Ullad, and one score and six- 
teen rings on the throne of Eri. 

" Have I through these many courses raised my 
voice so high, that the words of the law were not 
heard for the instant, 

" Let it be said of the king he was a man ; 
and his eye, seeing the weakness of his fellow, whis- 
pered to his heart to pity where law did sternly 
condemn. 

" When the nations of Eri spoke, and said, 

" Let Eocaid rule Ardri, the children of the land 
were unruly ; the kings courted the nobles, the chiefs 
soothed the Gaal, not for their good, and oppressed 
them to their hurt: 

" The arm of strife was ever ready to be uplifted, 
and nought to stay the assault of violence. 

" Firdanan's hate was to us. 

" Firgneat had ceased their love. 

" How hath it happed, that during my time, Eri 
hath dwelt in peace, that each oneknoweth his place, 
and keepeth it? 

" That the land putteth forth abundance and over, 
though the Gaal increase ? 

" The Cruimtear would say ; No ! Eocaid will be 
silent of the Cruimtear, they are enemies of Eocaid; 
he would not take their fancies, or worse, for his 
guide. 

" How hath it happed, that Eri standeth proudly 
as she doth ? what did the king that all these things 
hafh come to pass? 

" Hear the words of Eocaid, my sons ; 

" They have been the work of the Olam % who 

y 2 



106 CHRONICLES 

poured into my mind lessons of wisdom in the words 
of truth; that have instructed me to rule myself, to 
keep myjpassions in subjection to my reason, and 
to do unto all as I would have all do unto me." 

Now the pains of the king became excessive, and 
he said, 

" If Fionn my son, and Neartan, and Taltan, 
would remain nigh unto me, and let not Muinid and 
my children be far off." 

And on the next day all the Olam of Mur Olamain 
came to Dun Sobairce ; and when the youths were 
left, they flung out, and laid hold on five of the 
priests, and haled them to the house of the king. 

And the uproar reached the ears of Eocaid, and 
he asked the cause. 

And Fionn returned, and told unto his father, 
" The youths of Mur Olamain have heard of the 
doings of the priests of Gaelen, and they have hither 
brought five of the priests of Ullad, with intent to 
fling them into the sea." 

And the king said, 

" What would be said in aftertimes, if evil was to 
come upon these men?" 

And he raised himself and sat upright, and it 
seemed as if his strength was returning unto him : 

And he said, 

" Oh ! that my latter days should taste of the 
bitterness of grief! Is my work so soon to suffer 
destruction ? Are the laws dead in Eri that passion 
avengeth itself? 

" Is one of the children of the land to perish ere 
he be found worthy of death ? 



OF ERI. 197 

" Is the innocent to be confounded with the guilty ? 

" The fire of my spirit no longer warineth to 
nourishment; it burneth. 

" Neartan, go forth and stay the hands of the 
youths, and say unto them, 

" What though the king findeth fault iu their 
running out beyond the law, he must thank their 
love. 

" Let the youths return with the Olam: and, 
Fionn, let the priests be conducted to the places of 
their dwelling." 

And the chamber of the king was cleared, only 
Taltan and I Neartan remained. 

And on the next day, princes, chiefs, and of the 
Gaal swarmed round Dun Sobairce ; and loud la- 
mentations were uttered, O that they could but look 
on the king ! 

And when the words of the children of Ulladcame 
to the ear of Eocaid, he said, 

"What though my strength admitteth not that 
I may go forth, let me be borne on the arms of niy 
children into the presence of the Gaal." 

And Taltan sought to persuade him from it, but 
Eocaid said, " I will be borne hence : where can a 
king breathe for the last time with greater glory 
than in the midst of the people, their hearts full of 
love towards him?" 

And when he was carried forth, his four sons 
Fionn y Eocaid, Ardfear, and Cairbre* bearing him 
up, 

The waitings of the people made the air to quiver: 
and from the rocks were returned, and on the waves 



198 CHRONICLES 

of the sea were rolled back the plaintive sounds of 
the voices of the children of the land. 

And he was placed standing ; for he said, " My 
foot shall feel the land of Eri, whilst my voice shall 
be raised in the hearing of the people." 

And his voice was yet strong, arid he spake aloud, 

" For the full course of two score rings hath 
Eocaid ruled in Ullad; this day manifesteth unto 
me the fulfilment of my chiefest hopes. 

" Flattery doth not follow to the verge of life. 

" That the one law should be for all the children 
of Eri; 

" That all should be equal in the eye of the law ; 

" That the law should be above all continually. 

" To bring these things to pass hath been the 
care of all the days of the king, his care hath had 
a full reward. 

" The laws of Eri are laws of peace. 

" O that the time may never come when the pas- 
sions of men will fling aside the law of peace with 
the strong arm of violence : 

" Then would the evil spirit of discord make low 
the people, that the hand of power may oppress 
them. 

" Olam of Ullad, 

" Breathe into the minds of the people the know- 
ledge of truth. 

" Tell the children of the land, they are men. 

" Tell the king, and the princes, and nobles, they 
are but men. 

" Gaol, love as brethren; shed not the blood one 
of the other. 



OF ERI. 199 

" Afflict not the Danan; is there not a covenant 
between them and us? 

" Over-rule not Firgneat; have we not given the 
hand of peace unto them ? 

" Princes, nobles, and Gaal, 

" Receive unto your hearts the spirit of Eocaid; 
it will nourish you : 

" Let it pass for ever from generation to genera- 
tion, whilst sun, moon, and stars endure, to cherish 
the earth, and mark the seasons. 

" Olam, teach the people to keep their passions 
under the sway of reason : 

" To do unto, as they would be done unto. 

" Rehearse in their ears continually the words of 
Eocaid. 

" If this ye fail not to do, what though my bulk 
be dissolved, my spirit will be immortal." 

And when he had made an end, the Gaal were 
pressing towards him, and the chiefs who were nigh 
unto him, were for staying them. 

But the king said, " Nay, not so ; let the people 
see and hear me whilst they yet may ; it cannot be 
long till the heap shall be raised over me." 

And some few of the priests drew nigh, and they 
made obeisance before the king ; and they lifted up 
their hands, and they did beseech Baal, that the 
spirit of the king might become a good spirit, on the 
confines of the dwelling of Baal. 

And Eocaid smiled, and said, " Prithee, hold thy 
peace, where my spirit shall abide doth not depend 
on thee. 

" Priests, guard the fire, and note ths seasons, 



200 CHRONICLES 

minister to the wayfaring one, and the stranger far 
from the voice of his kindred." 

Now the pains of the king became excessive ; and 
he was borne to his chamber, and as he watched in 
night, his sons Fionn and Eocaid, Taltan, and I 
Neartan his chamber close unto, he called unto us 
by name, and he did say, 

" Two things do at this moment sting my spirit 
the fall of Noid, and that I did suffer myself to be 
placed on Liafail, and receive the asion and mantle 
of the king from the hand of a priest. 

" Neartan, when these deeds shall be told of me 
in times to come, set thou down on the chronicles of 
the land, the hope of Eocaid, that the inexperience 
of youth will be repeated with the tale, and plead 
for me through all succeeding times." 

Now he became worse till the sixth day, when 
he breathed for the last time. 

And the children of Ullad gathered themselves 
round Dun Sobairce; and on the ninth day the 
weight of Eocaid was borne from the chamber 
wherein it lay. 

And a way was opened in the midst of the con- 
gregation. 

And the chiefs of largael, Lame, Ardtain, and 
Dun Dalgan, bear the weight of Eocaid. 

And all the nobles of Ullad moved before them: 

And the four sons of the king moved close to the 
dead : 

And the princes of Er followed : 

And all the matrons and damsels did step after : 

And the Olam and the judges walked on this side, 



OF ERI. 201 

And the heads of the people on that side, of the 
form of him they were no more to see. 

And the many thousands of Ullad moved along 
on every side. 

Now what time the bearers had reached to the 
house of death, Baal had withdrawn the light of his 
countenance from the eyes of the children of Ullad. 

And Miiinid, Ard Olam of Dun Sobairce, with 
the youths, and the bards, and minstrels, were stand 
ing round about the heap, with torches to inflame the 
air of night. 

And when the weight of the king was laid on the 
rollers, the minstrels did play lamentably, and the 
women did sing piteously. 

And Muinid raised the death-song: 

Is it not amongst the writings of the bards of Mur 
Olamain of Dun Sobairce? 

And when the stones were rolled to the entrance 
of the heap, 

The bards and minstrels, women and damsels, 
poured forth the mournful dirge of lamentation, 
whilst the men looked on the earth with eyes 01 
woe. 

The whole congregation stood around the heap 
through the night: and when Baal shewed himseli 
in the freshness of his strength, the whole host 
turned their faces towards the sun, and bowed the 
head. 

Then I IS ear tan, from the summit of the heap, 
strove to raise my voice in vain; as J could, J spoke, 
and said, 

" Eocaid the son of Eiaca, of the race of Cier, 
son of the hero, king in Ullad, Ardri that hath been, 



202 CHRONICLES 

is laid in the house of darkness, on the bed of ever- 
dim ng sleep 

" What though eye shall no more behold him ; 

" What though ear shall no more hear the mu- 
sic of his voice, uttering enchanting lessons of wis- 
dom ; 

" His spirit will be immortal." 

And the congregation took their departure. 

As for Near tan, he is as one on the earth, what 
availeth aught to him as Eocaid is no more? 



CHAP. XV. 

The reign of Fionn king in Ullad and Ardri, a 
course of one score rings, from 663 to 643. 

THERE was not one prince nor noble of Ullad, nor 
one of the Olam, nor one of the heads of the people, 
that did not stand round about the heap of Eocaid, 
save Feargus, a prince of Er, and Cobta, chief of 
Tain Ailta, they lay on the bed of sickness, and Ros, 
he abided on Tobrad. 

And words were heard, " Better to say now who 
shall sit on the seat of the king in Ullad, the days 
of Teacmor are nigh at hand." 

And the princes and nobles abided together at 
Dun Sobairce for nine days: then did the assembly 
move to the mount. 

And with one voice, Fionn the first-born of Eo- 
caid was seated in the place of his father. 

And all presented their right hands towards the 
king ; no voice shouted, nor did the minstrels play 
nor was the song of joy heard. 



OF ERI. 203 

And Fionn rose* and said, 

" Brethren, arid men of Ullad, 

" My ear felt not so much pleasure in hearing 
your voices of praise, my eye felt not so much de- 
light on seeing your hands presented unto me, as my 
soul hath been transported at your silence, testifying 
your love for him that is no more. 

" Words are not the only means of expressing the 
passions of man ; by your silence my mind hath 
been given to understand that ye think what I do 
know, that I am not worthy to sit on the place of 
my gone father : 

" Whilst it instructeth me to tread in his steps, 
and thereby to prove myself acceptable in the sight 
of the people. 

" The spirit of my father abideth in me. 

" It is known unto us, that messengers have gone 
through the nations of Eri, calling the assembly to 
Tobrad. 

" What if we assemble at Dun Sobairce, and move 
together to Tobrad what time Baal shall have passed 
through two chambers of his house Tirim r 

And it was so. 

And they took their departure to the tents of 
their dwellings. 

And on the next day I Neartati did stand in the 
presence of Fionn ; the thought of Eocaid did af- 
flict the spirit of us twain, and tears did flow from 
the seat of memory a while till I could speak, then 
did I say, 

" Behold the words of thy father which he did 
place within my hands, saying, 

" Neartan, keep this, till it shall be known which 



204 CHRONICLES 

of the race shall be seated on the seat of the king in 
Ullad after me ; unto him then give thou this book."(a) 

And I added moreover, 

" Neartan doth beseech of the king to suffer him 
to abide in Mur Olamain of Dun Sobairce, his age 
needeth repose." 

And Fionn said, " Let Neartan do what is pleas- 
ing unto himself; should Fionn require his counsel, 
Neartan will not withhold it." 

And Fionn did embrace Neartan, calling him the 
friend of Eocaid. 

And Ros was chosen Ard Olam of Ullad, in the 
place of Neartan the son of Beirt. 

And now the pride of Ullad was at Dun So- 
bairce. 

And a vast multitude of the children of the land 
followed the steps of the king to the waters of Laca, 
and Taltan the physician of Eocaid bare Fionn com- 
pany to Tobrad. 

And when the time came that the assembly ofEri 
were together in the high chamber of Teacmor, 

And the heralds said aloud, 

" The seat of Ardri is empty." 

Iber king of Mumain rose, and said, 

" What if Fionn the son of Eocaid sit on the 
throne of Erir 

All held up their right hands. 

And the doors were opened for the assembly to 
go forth to the house of Liqfail. 

When Fionn rose from the seat of the king of 
Ullad, and he said, 

" Fionn the son of Eocaid will not go forth, he 
will not be seated on Liafail, nor will he receive the 



OF ERT. 205 

asion and mantle, but from the hands of his brethren 
of the race."(&) 

And the king of Mumain placed the asion on the 
head, and the king of Gaelen laid the mantle on the 
shoulders of the king, and they and Meirt con- 
ducted Fionn to the throne. 

And after a while he rose, and said, 

"The weight of my father layeth beneath his heap; 
the manner of his death is not known, that is to be 
inquired into. 

" What if the Ard Cruimtear of Gaelen and Fie- 
ban and Brenad of the priests of Gaelen, be called 
before the assembly? 

" Let the chief judge do right" 

And the assembly went forth and the feasts were 
prepared, and fifteen days were fulfilled ere the 
priests were on Tobrad. 

Then the doors of the high chamber were opened, 
and the assembly were together. 

And the chief judge rose, and said, 

" Ard Cruimtear and the two priests of Gaelen 
stand on Tobrad." 

And Fionn rose, and said, 

" Let them enter." 

And they were seated nigh unto the judges. 

And Doil the chief judge stood up, and he did 
read aloud all the words spoken of the men, and he 
added moreover, " In other nine days the matter 
will be inquired into." 

And when the nine days were passed, 

The chief judge stood up and said, " Let the 
chamberlain of Ardri that was be called." 

And Doncad came before the assembly, and he 



206 CHRONICLES 

raised up his right hand, and he swore by the sun, 
moon, and stars, and he invoked the spirit ofJEocaid, 
and he said, 

" These two did give unto me apparel for the bed 
Of the king, and did bid me to furnish it therewith, 
and moreover they did say unto me. If the king ask 
why is the apparel changed ? thou wilt answer and 
say, The friend of the king doth honour the king." 

And Taltan the physician of the king was called, 

And he did swear, the covering of the bed on 
which the king was laying, and the furniture over the 
king were wet as the moisture of the night, and the 
damp thereof did cause the death of the king. 

And the chief judge said, 

"What say the priests?" 

And Ard Cruimtear said, 

" What availeth my answer without the proof that 
the answer be the truth what more can we say, but 
nay ?" 

And the king rose, and said, 

" It is an easy matter to speak evil of any man, 
nevertheless evil may not have come from such an 
Due. 

" [ have lost a father more precious to me than 
this seat : it is not fitting that I abide here, lest the 
recollection of my loss, which is, and ever will be 
present to my memory, should cause me to forget 
myself. 

"I will hence; ye will hear the matter: so will 
justice be done to these men for or against." 

And the chief judge said, 

" If the priests will answer." 

And Ard Cruimtear said, 



OF ERI. 207 

" I did send words by the mouth of these men, 
priests of the most high Baal, unto the king, touch- 
ing things fit for the king to know. 

" And as the priests were journeying to the dwel- 
ling of the king, methought my duty it was to send 
a present by their hands also. 

" And I did send a rare skin of a beast of the sea 
for the king to lay thereon, and a piece of curious 
work to be spread over the king as he sleeped. 

" And I did say unto these men, tell not unto the 
king of what ye brought, save the words ; but say 
unto the servant of the king, if the king say, Why is 
the furniture changed, say thou, A friend of the 
king doth honour the king. 

" If the apparel did gather moisture in passing to 
Dun Sobaircey shall it be said that Ard Cruimtear 
did conceive aught of evil against the king ? Doth it 
not seem hard that evil should be imagined of us 
because of the neglect of another? Will not one 
who hath done wrong lay the fault on any to ease 
himself? 

" As for me, am I not to be lamented more than 
rebuked? 

" For these men they will speak for themselves, if 
aught they have to say. 1 ' 

And the priests said, 

" We have nought to say more than Ard Cruim- 
tear hath spoken." 

And when all were silent, the chief judge said, 

" Let the heralds attend the steps of Ardri. 

And Ardri entered the assembly, and took his 
on the throne. 

And Doil said aloud, 



208 CHRONICLES 

" Ye have heard the words against and for these 
men ; shall the roll of the laws be spread out, and 
words be read ?" 

And all kept their seats, 

And the chief judge said, 

" Let tJie men depart in peace." 

And Fionn placed Seadna a prince of Er on the 
seat nigh unto the seat of the king in Ullad. 

And ring after ring did Fionn go to Dun So- 
bairce; what Eocaid was, Fionn doth labour to be. 

And each ring after three rings, the assembly was 
together in the high chamber of Teacmor on Tobrad. 

And when Fionn had ruled twelve rings, Iber 
king of Mumain died, having ruled one score and 
nine rings. 

And Ceas his son was chosen. 

And when Fionn had ruled eighteen rings Ros 
died, and Strat was chosen Ard Olam in his place. 

And when Fionn had ruled one score rings 
lacking one ring, Aongus king of Gaelen died, hav- 
ing ruled one score rings and six, and Don his son 
was chosen. 

And when Fionn had ruled one score rings king 
in Ullad and Ardri, he died. And alt Eri mourned 
for Fionn. 

In his days no words were added to the words on 
the roll of the laws ; by the laws of Eocaid were 
the children of the land ruled. 

(o) This book I have, and will one day present it to the people of 
Eri 

(b) None of this race would ever sit on Liafail, or be present 
when a king of Mumain or Gaelen was inaugurated thereon. 



OF ERI. 209 



CHAP. XVL 

The reign of Eocaid, the son of Eocaid Olam Fodla, 
a space of seventeen rings, from 643 to 626. 

Now the assembly were on the mount ofUllad, and 
Eocaid the son of Eocaid Olam Fodla from Tatla 
ofFirgneat was chosen king in Ullad. 

And when the doors of the high chamber of Teac- 
mor were opened, and the kings, princes, and nobles 
were together to say who was to sit on the throne of 
Eri, Ardri, 

Don a prince of Graelen rose, and said, 

" It is said an oath stands on the chronicles of 
Eri, saying, ' Let a son of Er rule Ardri for ever.' 
Let those who so said, so do. What avail to us the 
words spoken ere we were? We of this day were not 
consenting thereunto. 

" Why may not one of the race of Iber? Why not 
one of the race of the first Erimionn be seated on the 
throne? 

" What if Don the son of Aongus king in Gaelen 
rule Ardri?" 

And Scandt the son of Meirt chief in Oldanmact 
rose, and said, 

" Are the laws of Eocaid, are the times of Fionn 
so soon forgotten ? Is the land weary of repose ? 

" My father swore, and Scandt will observe the 
words of his father. Therefore, 

" What if Eocaid the son of Eocaid king in Ullad 
be called to the throne?" 

And all the princes and nobles of Gaelen, and 

VOL. IT. p 



210 CHRONICLES 

seven nobles of Mumain, held up their right hands 
for Don. 

And all the princes and nobles of Ullad, and the 
king and all the princes, and eleven of the nobles 
of Mumain, and Lore prince of Ib-Lugad, and 
Scandt, and the nobles of Oldanmact, held up their 
right hands for Eocaid. 

Eocaid did not go forth to Liafail, Ceas king of 
Mumain placed the asion on the head, and Lore 
prince of Tb Lugad laid the mantle on the shoulders 
of the king. 

And the king did not go into Ullad year after year; 
he did place Ardfear, the son of Eocaid his father 
and Amarii, on the seat of the king in Dun Sobairce. 

And the assembly was called to the mount of 
Ullad duly, and the writings were read. 

And the doors of the high chamber oiTeacmor on 
Tobrad were opened the fourth ring after four rings, 
and the roll of the laws was spread out ; and the 
book of the chronicles was opened, and the words 
were read. 

Eocaid was skilled in the management of the horse 
above other men, and he taught how the breed might 
be larger and stronger than aforetime. 

And when Eocaid had ruled seventeen rings he 
took his departure from Teacmor, in his way to Dun 
Sobairce. 

And what time he reached the tents of the chief 
of.Maginis, the veins of his neck and his head be- 
came swoln, and his visage became black, and he 
died in excessive pain. 

And his heap is raised in Maginis. 



OF ERI. 211 



CHAP. XVII. 

The reign of Ardfear, a space of twelve rings, from 
626 to 614. 

Now the assembly of Ullad were called to the 
mount, and Cairbre the youngest of the sons of Eo- 
caid Olam Fodla was chosen. 

And what time the fires were seen on the summits 
of the plains of Eri, the kings, princes, and nobles 
were on Tobrad. 

And it was found that none, no not one of the 
kings, princes, and nobles had ceased since Eocaid 
had been chosen, seventeen rings afore, save Eocaid 
self, therefore do the bards in their songs call him 
Slanol. 

And the chief secretary said, 

" The seat of Ardri is empty, who shall sit 
thereon ?" 

And Cobta chief of Tainailta rose, and said, 

" What if Cairbre king in Ullad rule Ardri f 

Whereupon Cairbre rose, and said, " My he rt 
cleaveth unto Eri, but my soul abideth in Ullad. 

" In Ullad Cairbre first did breathe, in Ullad was 
he reared amongst the children of that land. 

" Should it seem good unto the kings, princes, and 
nobles that Cairbre was to sit on the throne of .Eri, 
might it not come to pass that Ullad might mourn his 
absence. Shall Cairbre cause grief to Ullad? 

" Let not my denial seem to slight your love, 
whilst my words are heard, saying, 

" Let another beside Cairbre be chosen." 

F2 



212 CHRONICLES 

Whereupon the acclamation was loud, and many 
voices were heard, saying, " Who so worthy as C air- 
Ire the son of Eocaid the just lawgiver, to sit on the 
throne of'Eri?" 

And Cairbre still standing, said, 

" It may not be, Cairbre will abide in Ullad" 

Arid Ceas king of Mumain said, 

" What if Ardfear the son of JBocaid rule, ArdriT' 

And it was so. 

Ardfear would not go forth to Liafail, and Ceas 
king in Mumain placed the asion on the head of 
Ardfear, but Don king of Gaelen would not lay the 
mantle on his shoulders; the words of the priests 
had influence on the mind of Don, and Noid the 
brother of Ceas did lay the mantle on the shoulders 
ofArdri. 

And when Ardfear had ruled two rings Ceas king 
of Mumain died, having ruled one score and seven 
rings, and Noid his brother was chosen. 

And in one other ring Don king of Gaelen died, 
having ruled one score rings and one, and Siorna his 
son was chosen. 

Ardfear and Cairbre walk in the steps of their 
race. 

Now when Ardfear had ruled seven rings, and 
the assembly of the high chamber of Teacmor on 
Tobrad were together. 

Ardfear rose, and said, 

" Ardri hath no words for the assembly, howbeit 
four rings must not pass without the princes of the 
race, and the nobles, and the Olam, and heads of 
the people coming together, that we may know each 
the other, and preserve E?i in peace, our hearts 



OF ERI. 213 

glowing with friendship, that the hope of the just 
lawgiver may be fulfilled. 

" Therefore my mind dcsireth to say unto my 
brethren what if the kings of the race of Her, and 
the chiefs of Oldanmact, and princes and nobles, and 
of the Gaol, as shall be inclined thereto, make a cir- 
cuit of Eri? 

"And let Cairbre king in Ullad, and Scandt chief 
of Oldanmact, be on Tobrad even here, what time 
Baal shall touch the threshold of his house Tionn- 
scnad. 

" And we will move to the tents of Gaelen, and 
from thence with Siorna to the tents of Noid, or how 
otherwise. 

" The time the sons of Eri abide together is too 
short methinks, to admit of their knowing each 
other." 

And the words of the king were very pleasing in 
the ears of all. And the feasts were prepared, and 
there was nought but sports and pastime. 

And the roll of the laws was brought forth from 
off the tables of the Teacmor, and the book of the 
chronicles, and the words were read aloud in the 
hearing of the assembly and of the GaaL 

And none abided on Tobrad for justice. 

And the assembly moved to the lands of their 
dwelling. 

And when Tionnscnad came, Cairbre and Scandi 
were on Tobrad, and they moved with Ardfear to 
the tents of Siorna, and all took their departure 
thence to the tents of Mumain, and princes and 
nobles, and gallant youths accompanied the kings of 
Eri. 



214 CHRONICLES 

And they were together for the course of four 
moons, joy and gladness ran through the land. 

And multitudes of the Gaal followed the steps of 
the princes, the chase and sports were repeated day 
after day ; at night the song, and music, and the 
dance, and tales of other times. 

Nought was heard but mirth and festivity, the 
like unto which hath not been seen in Eri. 

And what time Cairbre returned to Dun Sobairce, 
Sir at was no more, and Feilimid the son of Tarn was 
chosen Ard Olam of Ullad. 

Cairbre is the delight of the children of the land ; 
all who had heard of Eocaid Olam Fodla his father, 
remembered the words spoken of him in Cairbre. 

Now the Cruimtear gathered themselves together 
round Cairbre ; and they said, 

" The heart of the king of Ullad is turned away 
from the priests of the most high Baal; what can 
we do to make manifest our love for the king?" 

And Cairbre said, " Hath Cairbre done ye wrong, 
have the priests any cause of complaint of him ?" 

And they answered, " Nay, not so ; but the king 
calleth unto him not only the Olam, but the bards 
and minstrels, yea, and the dancers; and the priests 
he doth not calL" 

And Cairbre said, " Have ye lessons of wisdom 
to repeat in my ear? Have ye wherewith to gladden 
my heart ? Have ye aught to say unto me that I 
know not of?" 

And the high-priest began to talk of Baal, and of 
the priests that Baal had chosen for his servants for 
ever, who knew the secrets of Baal from the be- 
ginning ; 



OK KRI. 215- 

And the secrets of Baal told to the nine Cruim- 
tear, are the secrets known to the priests that now 
are, and so for evermore. 

And Cairbre said, 

" Have the priests told all the secrets of Baal to 
the children of the earth ? Good ; then they do 
know them* 

" Have they not told them ? Why have they with- 
held them ? Are they not fitting to be known ?" 

And the priests spake of strange things ; still Baal 
and the priests were one : who gave offence to the 
priests made Baal angered. 

And Cairbre said, " This is not wisdom ; wisdom 
is knowledge of the truth. Are your words true? 

" Ten rings had passed o'er Cairbre when his fa- 
ther died, and oft did he hear him say, ' The priests 
do speak of what they know not.' 

" I heard- my father say, and my father had the 
tongue of truth, the head of wisdom J heard him 
say, 

" Reason instructeth man to subdue his passions; 
true wisdom teacheth to do as we would be done by. 

" These are plain to the understanding; these are 
lessons that should not be kept secret, which every 
one hath senses to comprehend. 

" The priests continually speak of things, the un- 
derstanding of man cannot conceive/' 

And moreover Cairbre added, 

" Let the priests teach the children of the land 
what is good to be known, and they will be dear 
unto me. 

44 And if ye know not these things, learn them of 
the Olam the teachers of wisdom. 1 ' 



216 CHRONICLES 

And the priests were put to silence, and they went 
their way dejectedly. 

Now Ardjear had ruled for the course of twelve 
rings, and he had passed some days at the tents of 
the chief of Ard Deas, and he was returning thence 
towards Tobrad, Oilliol the son of Eocaid, and two 
youths, sons of Ceanard chief of Ardtain, in his 
company. 

And darkness spread itself on their way, and Ard- 

fear did mistake the passage through the waters of 

Buidaman; and he did make an attempt to go 

through ; but he did fail therein, and he was drowned. 

And on the morrow his form was found amongst 
osiers that grow on the edge of the waters ; and it 
was borne to Tobrad. 

And his heap was raised nigh unto Tobrad, to the 
eastward thereof. 



CHAP. XV III. 

The reign of Fiaca the son of Fionn, the son of 
Eocaid Olatn Fodla a space of eight rings, from 
614 to 606. 

NOW messengers went forth through Eri, to call 
the kings, and princes, and nobles, to Tobrad, to 
choose Ardri. 

And Fiaca the son of Fionn the son of Eocaid 
Olam Fodla, was seated on the throne. 

He did not go forth to Liafuil, the king of Mumain 



OF ERI. 217 

did place the asion on the head, and the king of 
Gaelen did lay the mantle on the shoulders of the 
king. 

And the assembly abided together for one moon. 

The frame of Fiaca is weakly, but he doth walk 
in the way of his race; he nourisheth the fire of the 
youth, and he doth give a charge to the Olam con- 
cerning them. 

His mind is inclined towards Oiliiol, the son of 
Eocaid, some time Ardri: Oiliiol doth direct in every 
thing, though he be not of the age to rule. 

And the assembly is called together in due sea- 
son. 

And the words of the roll of the laws, and of 
the book of the chronicles are read : all the ways 
of Fiaca are right and just. 

And when he had ruled in such sort for eight 
rings, he died, having pined away from the inward 
of him. 



CHAP. XIX. 

The Reign of Oiliiol Beam Gael, a space of tivelve 
rings, from 606 to 594. 

Wow Fiaca was no more; and the kings, princes, 
and nobles were together on Tobrad. 

And Oiliiol the son of Ardfear the son of Eocaid 
Olam Fodla, was chosen, and he would not be seated 
on Liafail. 

And Oiliiol the son of Eocaid the son of Eocaid 



218 CHRONICLES 

Olam Fodla, cast an eye of jealousy on Ardri, for 
he ruled in all things whilst Fiaca lived, and he 
thought to sit on the throne when Fiaca should 
cease, (a) 

The spirit of Cairbre was troubled, because of 
the evil practised by these twain each to the other 
continually ; they strove to draw unto them the 
princes of Er, and the nobles of Ullad; and Oilliol 
Beargneat sought to incline the hearts of the Gaol 
of Ullad to a love for war. 

The king, and princes, and nobles of Gaelen in- 
clined now to one, now to another, to the hurt of the 
race of Er. 

Still Cairbre caused the Danan and the Firgneat 
to live in peace. 

Thus was it all the days of Noid king in Mu- 
main: he did cherish the memory of Failbe, the 
spirit of whom abided with him, the spirit of justice 
and of peace. 

But Noid having ceased what time Oilliol had 
ruled seven rings, and Iber his son being chosen, 
Iber did lend his ear to the words of Siorna, for 
Iber had taken Melisa the daughter of Muredac the 
son of Siorna. 

And Iber and Siorna did make wider and wider 
the breach between the sons of Er. 

Nor could the words of Cairbre stay the madness 
of the princes, and nobles of Ullad. 

The war-song, and the sound of arms, and the 
noise of horses for the battle, did overpower their 
reason. 

And when Oilliol had ruled Ardri eleven rings, 
Oilliol Beargneat passed into Oldanmact, and he 



OF ERI. '2(9 

and Magn, who sat in the place of Scandt, who had 
ceased, did make a covenant. 

And Magn did give the word of promise in this 
wise : 

" Shall Oilliol Ardri assemble the host against 
Ullad, Magn will be helping unto Ullad. 

" Shall the warriors of Ullad move forth of their 
land, Magn will abide in Oldanmact" 

And words were brought of the doings of Oilliol 
unto Cairbre, and how that he was going through 
Ullad, assembling the men of the land for war against 
Ardri. 

And Cairbre did send a messenger with letters, 
saying, 

" Let Oilliol prince of Ullad come unto Cairbre." 

And he did come. And the king sent to have 
Ardfear his son, and me Feilimid, to come unto him 
also. 

And Cairbre did intreat Oilliol to suffer the land 
to enjoy repose. 

And when he saw that the mind of Oilliol was 
bent towards dominion, and that he would shed the 
blood of the people that he might rule, Cairbre, sigh- 
ing heavily, said unto him : 

" Is reason so entirely dead in thee, that thy pas- 
sions have no control ? If thy desire is for power, 
will Ullad content thee, thou shall sit on the seat of 
the king, the princes and nobles consenting there- 
unto; only swear unto me, thou wilt not vex Ullad, 
nor trouble Eri. n 

And Oilliol did swear. 

And messengers were sent through the land forth 
with with letters, saying, 



220 CHRONICLES 

" Let the assembly meet the king on the mount 
of Ullad, out of hand." 

And when all the princes and nobles were gathered 
together on the mount, and a mighty concourse of 
the Gaol stood round about, 

Cairbre walked towards, and a company of the 
Olam, and the judges, and a multitude of bards 
and minstrels attended the steps of the king. 

And when he drew nigh unto the mount, and be- 
held the princes, and nobles, and people, armed, he 
said, 

" Heralds, speak aloud, 

" Let the sword, and the bow, and the sling, 
abide in the tents of the men of Ullad. Is the work 
of peace to be wrought with implements of war ? 
Cairbre will not raise his voice in the midst of the 
host armed for battle." 

And all laid down their arms on the earth, and 
held up their hands, 

And Cairbre entered into the assembly, and Fear- 
gus, a prince of Er, did place the asion on his head, 
and lay the mantle on his shoulders, and Cairbre took 
his seat. 

And when silence abided, Cairbre rose, and said, 

" Our fathers have said, we their sons do say, 
from Tainistact, 

" One shall have seen one score rings and five, 
ere he may rule. 

" Again, 

" He that is not perfect in his members, or shall 
lack in understanding, may not rule. 

" Three score and eighteen rings have been com- 
pleted since Cairbre first did breathe ; were it not 



OF ERI. 221 

as good that old age should be relieved from the 
burden, as that youth shall be restrained from the 
exercise of power ? 

" Oilliol the son of Eocaid, the son of my father 
thinketh himself equal to the weight. 

" Are the princes and nobles of the same mind as 
Oilliol, Cairbre will be consenting unto them, and he 
doth say, 

" Let Oilliol the son of Eocaid sit on the seat 
of the king in Ullad." 

And Dorlat chief of Magmor stood up, and 
said, 

" Is the mind of the king inclined freely to leave 
his seat for Oilliol 7" 

And Cairbre^ still standing, said, 

" Princes and nobles of Ullad, 

" Think not for that the mind of Cairbre desireth 
repose; I yield the power I had from ye, not setting 
due value on the gift ; nay, so great is my respect 
therefor, I would not incur the hazard of abusing it 
in the infirmity of age. 

" Up to this day, if peradventure overborne by 
frailties at any time I have done a wrong, let it be 
told in the hearing of the land, and I will make 
atonement one hundred fold. 

" Have I done well, it hath been the spirit of my 
father that still directeth me in all my ways. 

" To the words of Dorlat, Cairbre doth freely an- 
swer, Yea." 

And Dorlat said, 

" What if Oilliol the son of Eocaid the son of 
Eocaid Olam Fodla, the just lawgiver from Er son 



222 CHKONICLES 

of the hero, be chosen, according to the words of 
Cairbre the king?" 

And it was so. 

And Cairbre rose from his seat, and he moved 
towards Oilliol, and he did take off the asion from 
his head, and place it on the head of Oilliol; and he 
did strip his shoulders of the mantle, and he did 
lay it on the shoulders of Oilliol; and he did present 
his hand unto him, , and conduct him to the seat of 
the king. 

No shout of joy was heard. 

And when the assembly broke up, all flocked 
around Cairbre, and attended on him, doing him 
honour. 

And on the next day Cairbre did leave Dnn So- 
bairce with his son Ardfear* and they came to Mur 
Olamain. 

The princes and nobles, and divers of the heads of 
the people, did tarry at Dun Sobairce with Oilliol^ 
as Cairbre did bid. 

And the boards were spread, and the feasts were 
prepared ; and whilst the hours .passed round, 

Oilliol did say, 

" Bearngael troubleth the land ; the children of 
Eocaid the just, and good, and wise, have delighted 
in peace, save him: my mind inclineth to peace; if 
the battle is to be fought, shall Oilliol the son of 
Eocaid prove unworthy of his race? Never be it 
said, the princes and nobles of Ullad declined the 
combat." 

Now noise ran through the land, preparation for 
war was heard through 



OF ERI. '223 

And Oilliol forot the oath that he gave to Cair- 



And Ardri sent letters unto Cairbre, saying, 

" What is this thou hast clone? Is it of a truth 
thoti hast yielded the throne of Ullad to the son of 
Tatla? hath folly crept over thee? hath madness 
seized upon thy senses ? is it after this manner thou 
hast proved thy love of peace ? 

" Dost thou fancy lleargneat will rest content 
with Ullad ? He will vex the land for the throne of 
SH* 

And when Cairbre read the words of Oilliol, he 
clasped his hands together, and heaved piteously, 
and he said, 

" Would that the weight of Cairbre had heeri un- 
der his heap ere the last moon weaned, then would 
all his time have been most happy ! A cloud of 
darkness hath come over me," 

Till now the soul of Cairbre took delight in mirth, 
in the song, and music, and the chase ; from this day 
forth he was not seen to smile, and oft, and oft, did 
he say unto me, " Fcilimid, 

" Alas! Ullad will be torn, Eri will be rent asun- 
der !" 

And Cairbre abided in Mur Olamain for fifteen 
days, and he died, having ruled one score and eleven 
rings. 

Now Cairbre had said unto Labra and Ardfear 
his sons, and unto rne Feilimid and the Olam, and of 
the princes and nobles, 

" Let my weight be laid by the side of what re- 
maineth of my father : let the heap of my father be 
my heap also." 



224 CHRONICLES 

Now these words came to the ears of the priests, 
and they cried aloud, " The thing may not be. 
Who is he that will roll away the stone from the 
entrance of the house of death ?" 

And they did strive to stir up the Gaol to hin- 
der the intent of the sons of Cairbre. 

And when the day came that the form of Cairbre 
was to be taken forth, was not Ullad gathered to- 
gether round Mur Olamain? 

And the weight of Cairbre was borne by Labra 
and Ardfear his sons, and the chiefs of largael and 
Dundalgan. 

And princes, and nobles, and Olam, and heads of 
the people, and bards and minstrels, and the thou- 
sands of Ullad y and matrons, and damsels, moved 
with the dead. 

And when the congregation came nigh uuto the 
heap where Eocaid Olam Fodla that had been, was 
laid, behold priests of Ullad stood thereby, and 
Ard Cruimtear was at the entrance thereof. 

And the weight of Cairbre was set on the rollers, 
and Labra said, 

" Who is he that stoppeth the way of the dead to 
the chamber of rest r" 

And Ard Cruimtear answered, 

" This is the house assigned to Eocaid, king that 
was, by the most high Baal; thereto the stone hath 
been rolled, the entrance closed, woe unto the man 
whose hand sha.i be out-stretched to open the door 
thereof. 

" Itotrf allowetn not this thing, nor doth the king." 

And Ardfear said aloud, 

" Priest, thou hast said : The hand cf Ardfear the 



OF ERI. 225 

son of Cairbre, shall be out-stretched to prepare the 
way, that the form of his father may be laid beside 
*he form of the father of Cairbre" 

And Ard Cruimtear said aloud, " It may not be." 
And he turned his eyes upon the priests, and they 
did look upon the Gaal assuredly. 

When Ardfear raised his voice, and said, 

" It may be, and it shall be." 

Then were the voices of the thousands of the Gaal 
heard, saying, 

" Shall the priests give law to Ullad?" 

And the priests departed from the heap. 

And the weight of Cairbre was rolled to the side 
of the place where Eocaid his father had been laid. 

The strings of the harps trembled, the minstrels 
were in grief: 

The voices of the matrons and the damsels fal 
tered ; they were in woe : 

The men of the land held not up the head : 

All the princes and nobles were touched at heart, 
for Cairbre was no more. 

And I Felimid raised the death-song of the king 
that had been ; had I said all I might have spoken, 
many would have been the words of Felimid; few 
were the words of my breath, sorrow suffered not 
many to pass my lips. 

Now Ardri sent a messenger with letters unto 
Oilliol, saying, 

" Let Oilliol king in Ullad answer in the high 
chamber of Teacmor on Tobrad, why doth he as- 
sault the ear of peace with the uproar of war." 

And Oilliol did send words by the messenger of 
the king, saying, 

VOL. II. Q 



226 CHRONICLES 

" If the noise of preparation for war affrighteth the 
ears of Ardri, let him hide his head in the folds of 
his mantle." 

And Ardri did send a messenger to Magn chief 
in Oldanmact, saying, 

" Words have come to the ear of the king, Magn 
will be helping unto the king of Ullad against Ardri." 

And Magn did repeat his words that he had 
spoken to Oilliol, but not the words of Oilliol unto 
Magn. 

And Oilliol king of Ullad did look on the priests 
with the eye of regard, and they were seen within 
Dun Sobairce. 

And the priests spoke to the Goal of the battle, 
and that Baal did shed the rays of his glory round 
the warrior ; 

That the spirit of the warrior was a good spirit ; 
that the voice of the battle raised the heart of the 
feeble, and gave vigour to the arm of the weak. 

They told of the war-song, long time unheard. 

They cried, What death so glorious as the death 
of the warrior ! He falleth in his prime ; his spirit 
fresh and hale winging its way to the confine of the 
blessed mansion of Baal, through pure air, on pi- 
nions of undecayed strength, as the young eagle, 
proudly. 

And the Olam, when they did hear of the words 
of the priests, they did go through the land, saying, 

"Is the spirit of Eocaid and of Cairbre extin- 
guished in the souls of the princes, and nobles, and 
Gaal, save the Olam ?" 

And the Olam sought the bard, and the minstrels 
called they to them, and they said, 



OP ERI. 227 

" Sing of love, sing of the chase, sing the tales of 
other times, and let the harps be tuned to the voice 
of the bards." 

And the Olam spake to the priests, saying, 

" Speak of peace, speak of the beauty of know- 
ledge unto the people." 

But the priests said, " What availeth the sound of 
the voice of the priests of the Most High? have they 
not been put to shame? Are not the people taught 
by the lessons of the Olam to laugh the priests to 



scorn ?" 



The words of the Olam were as the breath of the 
wind in the ear of the priests. 

And the kings of Mumain and of Gaelen stirred 
up the mind of Ardri to his undoing; they said unto 
him, " Lay more weight on Oldanmact ; the Danan 
are growing headstrong." 

And Ardri roused the spirit of Oldanmact to do 
him hurt, and the host of Oldanmact spread them- 
selves through Ullad. 

And Oilliol called together the nobles of Ullad, 
and the chiefs of the Danan, and he said unto 
them, 

" Ardri foldeth us up in Ullad, the weight of war 
oppresseth the land. 

" Tt hath been told unto me, when we shall chase 
Ardri over the waters of Eider, Iber and Siorna will 
no longer cleave unto him." 

And when Ardri found that Oilliol and Magn 
purported not to answer before the great congrega- 
tion of Eri, 

He assembled the warriors of Mumain and 
and moved towards Dun Sobairce. 

Q2 



228 CHRONICLES 

And Oilliol said, " Let the host of Ullad and of 
Oldanmact gather themselves round the chiefs ; and 
the lions of Ullad and the wolves of Oldanmact will 
drive the keepers before them." 

And Ardri passed the waters of Eider, he moved 
not in his strength ; the kings of Mumain and of 
Gaelen had hollow hearts towards him ; for they 
said, 

" Let the sons of Er waste the strength one of 
the other." 

Now Ardri had raised up his tents on Maginis; 
the warriors of Oir in Mumain, a mighty race, were 
not yet with the king. 

And as the host of Ullad and of Oldanmact were 
moving towards the Eider, they beheld the tents of 
Ardri. 

And they raised up their tents on the plain. 

And on the morrow the warriors were in motion, 

And Oilliol said, 

" Let the heralds of Ullad say aloud in the hear- 
ing of Ardri, 

" Cu the war-horse of Oilliol beareth his rider to- 
wards Teacmor on Tobrad"(V) 

Now Ardri perceived that Siorna did move but 
slowly, and Iber did but, as it were, note the steps 
of Siorna. 

Things being as they were, he came down from his 
horse, and he opened the clasps of his mantle, and 
he laid it on the earth, and he loosed the belt of his 
sword, and placed it on the mantle, and he said, 

" These are of peace: let them be hung up in 
the tent of the king." 



OF ERI. 229 

And he invoked the spirit of Eocaid, the spirit of 
peace, and he said aloud, 

" Let the heralds tell, in the hearing of the king 
of Ullad, 

" As the storm of the battle hath risen, the asion 
alone encircleth the brow of Ardri. The mantle of 
the king, and the sheath of his sword, abide in his 
tent. 

" Let Ardri hear the voice of war, even from the 
mouth of Oilliol, and he will answer it." 

And Oillol moved on his horse towards Ardri; 

And when he saw him standing on the ground, 
stripped of his mantle, Oilliol came down from his 
horse, and he loosed the clasps of his mantle, and 
threw it from him, and the sheath of his sword he 
flung away. 

And when Ardri and Oilliol came nigh unto each 
other, Ardri said, 

" Ullad is too narrow for the imagination ofOilliot, 
his fancy doth delight to dwell on the charms of 
the throne of Eri. Let no drop of the Gaol be shed 
for this transgression of the king of Ullad^ 

And Ardri and the king of Ullad stood foot to 
foot, and fought as though war had beea their cus- 
tom, neither gained nor lost one step. 

And long time thus they fought, shield to shield, 
sword to sword, when Ardri strove to push the 
king of Ullad from him. 

And the fore part of the foot of Ardri did give 
back, and Oilliol sprung off, and he did smite the 
king of Eri in the lower part of his right side, be- 
neath all his ribs. 

And the king of Eri fell, and his inside came forth : 



230 CHRONICLES 

But no shouting was heard. 

And those nigh unto the king ran and raised him 
from the earth to bear him to his? tent:, but he did 
say, " Nay ; let the last of my breath be mingled 
with the pure air: I have lived long enough." 

And unto the king of Ullad he said, 

" If thou shalt be chosen Ardri, thon wilt have 
little of the pleasure thy fancy telleth thee of, and 
abundance of pain thou never yet hast thought upon. 

" Shouldest thou be chosen, even, yet receive into 
thee the spirit of Eocaid.. Cherish peace-. 

" Siorna hath deceived me ; Jber hath proved false 
toward me: so will the children of.lofar ever to 
the sons of Er? These were the last of the words 
of Oilliol Bearngael, having ruled Ardri for the 
course of twelve rings. 

And the heap was raised over Oilliol, on the spot 
whereon he fell. And Maaca Ard Olam of Eri 
chanted the death-song. 

And Oilliol, king of Ullad, raised the war-song, 
and all the warriors of Eri. poured forth their voices 
round the heap. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER XIX. 

(a) You will recollect Eocaid Olam Fodla had Fionn and Eocaid 
by Tatla of the Fsargneat, Ardfear and tydrbrcby Amaril of his own 
race ; therefore, Oilliol the son of Eocaid was called Beargneat, and 
Oilliol the son of Ardfear was called Bearngad, because of their 
mothers. 

(b) Cu is the greyhound. 

This was the first contention and disunion amongst the sons of 
Erfor the space of 41 C 2 years, and the first time the people were 
armed against each other through Eri, since the fall of Noid, one 
hundred and nine years passed. 



OF ER1. 231 

CHAP. XX. 

The reign of Oilliol Beafngheat the son of Eocaid 
king in Ullad and Ardri, a space of sixteen rings, 
from 394 to 578. 

Now the messengers had gone forth through Eri 
to call the assembly to Tobrad. 

And when they were together, and the chief se- 
cretary said aloud, 

" The throne is empty," 

Talt chief of Mag Lein rose and said, 

" What if Siorna, king in Gaelen, be chosen?" 

Now Siorna had counted three score rings and 
eight, yet was his desire to rule, Ardri. And the 
princes and nobles looked on each other. 

Awhile, and Magn rose and said, 

"I heard my father say, it is of Tainistact ; I 
have heard the words repeated, 

" Let a prince of the race of Er sit on the throne 
df Eri for ever. 

" I heard my father say, he had it from his fa- 
ther, that Meirt did tell, an oath is noted on the 
book of the great antiquity of the land, so saying: 

" Meirt, sware not by your Baal; he did sware 
by the spirits of the vast deep ; and the chiefs of 
Oldanmact hold not up the right hand in vain. 

" And Meirt and Scandt did give the hand of pro- 
mise with the word of truth ; and Magn doth stand 
and sit in the place of his fathers. 

" Whilst I was in Ullad I did sceArdfear the son 
of Cairbre, a noble youth, his years are not yet full, 
he cannot rule. 



232 CHRONICLES 

" Labra the son of Cairbre I did also see ; iiis rv.^ ^ 
are counted, he is stored with wisdom more than his 
time seemeth ; I spoke to him of Teacmor. Hear his 
words : 

" Was Labra worthy of the throne of Eri, how 
great would be the loss of Ullad by his absence, 
jLabra will abide in Ullad. 

" Ard/ear cannot, Labra would not rule. 

" What if Ollliol king in Ullad take the throne?" 

And many voices were heard ; and Tatla and 
Firgneat were spoken of. 

And the chief of Tain Ailta rose, and said, 

" Was not Fionn the son of Eocaid of Tatla ? Was 
not Eocaid the brother of Fionn of Tatla ? Was not 
Fiaca the son of Fionn of Tatla? May Oilliol be like 
unto the least of these!" 

And Oilliol was chosen. 

He went not forth to Liafail; Cobta prince of Ith 
placed the asion on the head, and Magn laid the 
mantle on the shoulders of the king. 

And the boards were spread, and the feasts were 
prepared, and mirth and joy filled the hearts of all 
round Tobrad. 

And when the days of sports and festivity were 
passed, and the doors of the high chamber were 
opened. 

Ardri rose, and said, 

" The king hath nought whereof to say unto the 
assembly; what Eocaid Olam Fodla was, he cannot 
hope to be; but he will be like unto him as nearly as 
he can." 

And Oilliol added moreover, 

" In looking on the writing of Eocaid Olam Fodla 



OF ERI 233 

the just and wise lawgiver of Eri, I have seen these 
words, 

" What though nothing were to be added to the 
roll of the laws ; what though no complaints were to 
be uttered in the high chamber ; what though none 
ever were to stand on Tobrad for justice; 

" Is it not good that the kings and princes and 
nobles, and the Olam, and heads of the people, and 
all who follow their steps, do come together at ap- 
pointed season, to hold intercourse of friendship, 
and to know each other, that the Gaol still continue 
one nation ? 

" Is it not good that the roll of the laws be spread 
out, and the book of the chronicles be opened, and 
the words read aloud ? 

" Therefore, what if for times to come we make 
the usage, 

" That the roll of the laws of Eri be spread out, 
and the words read, and the custom of Tainistact be 
repeated on the third day ? 

" And the writing of Eolus, and the chronicles of 
Gaelag on the second day ? 

" And the chronicles of Eri on the day before the 
assembly shall separate, and the doors of the high 
chamber shall be closed ? 

" For myself I say, my ear doth like to hold the 
words, as it doth delight in the lengthened note of 
the delicious harp. 

" Doth it not pain the spirit when the eye seeth 
the fingers of the unskilful minstrel sweep o'er the 
strings, as posting to an end, when his soul couched 
in his ear in extasy, should have chastised the too 



234 CHRONICLES 

nimble hand, teaching it to dwell in rapture on the 
swoln chords? sov 

" Ardri rneaneth these words but for the chroni- 
cles of the land. 

" What if." 

And it was so. 

And hone did stand on Tobrad for justice; and 
the doors of the high chamber were closed. 

Oiiliol dwelleth in his tent on Tobrad. 

He rnaketh Mur Olamain his care. 

And when Baal was four nights in his house Slat, 
Oiiliol went to Dun Sobairce ; and the messengers 
went forth, calling the assembly to the mount of 
Ullad. 

And as the king and I Feilimid were together 
within the house of the king, Oiiliol said unto me, 

" The princes and nobles and the Gaal will be on 
the mount ere long, I have a desire to hear the words 
that thou hast set down for the ears of Ullad, during 
all the days of Oiiliol Bearngael" 

And 1 did read the words in the ear of the king, 
and he sat musing; a while he said, "Words on that 
book do sting my eye and ear. 

" O that the spirit of Eocaid had been stronger in 
me, so would my passions hare been kept under the 
guidance of my reason. 

" The portion of wisdom that is in me teach eth 
me to know the truth ; Oiiliol practised deceit 
against Cairbre; he coveted the seat of the king in 
Ullad; his heart was sick for the throne of Eri. 

" Had Labra or Ardfear dealt with me as 1 dealt 
with their father, how hotly would my wrath b^ 
kindled against them ! 



OF ERI. 235 

" The knowledge of the ways of wisdom is one, 
to walk on the path thereof is another." 

And when the king did pause, I said, 

" The ear of wisdom is not offended with the 
words of truth, though they do wring it sorely. 

" Was it well done* to suffer the priests to provoke 
the minds of the children of the land to shed each 
other's blood ?'' 

And Oilliol said, " The thought of that thing 
paineth my spirit; the priests did lead my reason into 
captivity, and did set my passions to be watchmen 
over it. 

" Oilliol knew all these to be transgressions, he 
shunned the thought of them during the chase after 
the object of his heated imagination. What hath 
been done cannot be undone. For the times to come 
Oilliol will tread in the steps of Eocaid and of 
Cairbre. 

" Now, prithee Feilimid the friend of Cairbre, hear 
my words. 

" How canst thou read words on the book of the 
chronicles in the hearing of the children of the land, 
that will wound the heart of Oilliol? How can he 
endure the sound of the words, saying, And Oilliol 
forgot the oath that he swore to Cairbre ? 

" Let all my transgressions be laid open; but, pri- 
thee Feilimid, let not these words, and some few more 
of like sort stand against Oilliol now and for ever." 

And I did stand up before the king, and I did say 
unto him, 

" When the writing of Eolus was placed between 
the hands ofTai-lat, in Gaeleg of our fathers, Tarlat 



236 CHRONICLES 

did swear that he would set down during his time, 
all things fit for the ear and eye; to give due praise, 
and deserved censure; to encourage to good, to 
deter from evil deeds; and moreover he did swear, 
that not one word of falsehood should have place on 
the leaves whereon he should write. 

" That same oath did FeiUmid take, therefore 
should FeiUmid ask the king, doth he find aught of 
falsehood in the words Feilimid hath wrote, what 
would be the answer of the king?" 

When Oiiliol said, 

" Shame oppresseth Oiiliol when he doth answer, 
'it is for that the words are true I feel the pain." 

And I did say, "When Feilimid shall read the 
words that he hath written, and those that now have 
passed, m the hearing of Uliad and of Oiiliol on the 
mount, 

" Was FeiUmid in thy place he would confess his 
fault, so would he find favour in the sight of the 
children of the land." 

And Oiiliol said, " It is well, it is fitting that I 
feel many heavy strokes for the evil I have wrought." 

And when the day came, and the assembly were 
together on the mount, 

The king rose, and said, 

" Now peace abideth through Eri, my desire is 
to enjoy the charms thereof in Ullad. 

" The king hath no words for the ears of the as- 
sembly. 

" What if the words on the roll of the laws be 
read? 

" And the book of the chronicles ?" 



OF ERI. 237 

And the words were read. 

And the heralds called aloud, " Stand any on the 
mount for justice?" 

And Oilliol rose, and said, 

" The words of Feilimid Ard Olam have been 
heard calling for justice against Oitliol the sou of 
Eocaid the son of Eocaid Olam Fodla. \ have trans- 
gressed ; let my shame and my acknowledgment find 
favour in the sight of the children of the land. 

" Hath not my great father Eocaid, the tongue 
of truth, the head of wisdom, said unto Fionn his son, 

" Tell the children of Ullad they are men. 

" Tell the king, and princes, and nobles they are 
but men.'* 

And the people shouted aloud, "Baal prosper all 
the works of the king!" And the assembly presented 
their right hands toward Oilliol. 

And Oilliol moved towards Labra the son of 
Cairbre, and he took him by the right hand, and he 
conducted him to the seat beside the seat of the, 
king, and he seated him thereon. 

And he said, 

" Labra will sit for the king in Ullad', he will be 
the friend of Oilliol, and teach him wisdom, and how 
to walk in the steps of his father." 

The air shook with acclamations at the words of 
Oilliol. 

And the assembly broke up, and all moved to 
Dun Sobairce. Joy and mirth and gladness abode 
in the house of the king, and nil around. 

And after one moon Oilliol took his departure for 
Teacmor. 



238 CHRONICLES 

When Oilliol had ruled four rings Feilimid died, 
and Siorlat was chosen Ard Olam of Ullad. 

Eri dwelleth in peace. 

Oilliol hath come into Ullad ring after ring, and 
when eleven rings had passed, words came to his 
ears, the nobles and heads of the people do say, 

" The course of the king through Ullad is like 
unto the motion of Baal when he scorcheth the 
fruits of the earth." 

And Oilliol said, that it may be told in the hear- 
ing of the people, 

" As the circuit of the king hath consumed the 
land, he will abide in Dun Sobairce; let the princes, 
and nobles, and all come unto him." 

And while he remained in Ullad there was feast- 
ing, and music, and the chase. 

Oilliol did take delight in horses, he excelled in 
the management of them ; he did send through Eri 
for the largest of the race of dogs, and he had skill 
above others to improve the breed thereof. 

And Labra did sit in wisdom and in justice. 

And the doors of the high chamber of Teacmor 
were opened duly all the days of sixteen rings that 
Oilliol ruled, then did he die at Dun Sobairce ; and 
his heap is raised in Cluan Eac, nigh thereunto; his 
death-song chanted ; no war-song was heard ac- 
cording to the words of the king. 



Note. You have now read the laws ofEri, set in order by our great 

legislator Eocaid Olam Fodla, established on the primitive institutions 
of the Scythian rare, by which laws, with the addition of THREE, 



OP ERI. 239 

the nations of Eri were ruled for one thousand years. Should any 
one fancy, from their similitude to the laws of the Hebrews, called 
Ten Commandments, that these are of modern date, the compila- 
tion of some Christian priests, let the fancy vanish on the recollec- 
tion of the fact that the Hebrews were Scythians as well as the Ibe- 
rians, and that the ten laws of the Hebrews, and the nine laws of 
Eri, are but the recognition of the original institutions, always in 
practice, though only at some certain time solemnly acceded to by 
the people. 

Having spoken in the Dissertation, as far as necessary, of the laws 
and customs of this tribe, and the Chronicles being full and explicit, 
I have nothing here to add for the purpose of elucidating the 
subject. 



Cf)rom'cle0 of Cit 



PART THE FOURTH. 



CHAP. I. 

The reign o/*Siorna the son of Don, king o/* Gaelen, 
a space of one score rings, from 578 to 558. 

NOW the assembly were called to the mount of Ul- 
lad ; and Labra the son ofCairbre was chosen king 
in Ullad. 

And the doors of Teacmor were opened, and the 
kings and princes and nobles of Eri were together. 

And the heralds said aloud, " The throne is 
empty." 

And Feilimid chief of Aoimag rose, and said, 

" What if Labra king in Ullad be chosen ?" 

When Labra rose, and said. " Nay ; Labra will 
abide in Ullad: 1 

And Murchard a prince of Gaelen rose, and said, 
What if Siorna king in Gaelen rule, Ardri ? n 

When voices were heard, saying, 

"An -alh, an oath." 

And Labra said, " Four score rings and nine 
have been completed since the kings, princes, and 
nobles of Eri did swear that one from Er should 



CHRONICLES OF ERI. 241 

rule, Ardri, for ever. What one of all this assembly 
did breathe on that day ? 

" To my thinking an oath bindeth but him who 
did swear. Was that dark and heavy day to come 
that the princes of the race of Er were to prove un- 
worthy, must it be that one of them should be cho- 
sen Ardri ? 

" Is it pleasing in the sight of the assembly of 
Eri, that a prince of Iber or of lolar rule why 
not ?"() 

When Labra made an end, 

Mur chard rose, and repeated his words, " Let 
Siorna sit on the throne of Eri." 

Now Siorna had counted four score rings and five, 
and when Murchard had spoken, all laughed aloud. 

And Siorna rose, and feaid, 

" lolar hither came from Gaeleg of our fathers, and 
helped to win this land, and ruled Erinrionn. 

" I am of the race of lolar, the age of the eagle is 
three hundred rings, and Siorna hath counted rings 
few more than four score ; he feeleth the fire of the 
spirit yet warm within hiin.(^) 

" Is no one more worthy to be found, Siorna will 
not decline the tender of the hearts and hands of the 
kings, princes, and nobles of Eri." 

And the young men of the princes and nobles 
clapped their hands, and shouted, 

" Let Siorna take repose on the throne of Eri /" 

And the young men of Mumain and of Gaelen 
bare Siorna on their shoulders, and Ard Cruimtear 
did seat him on Liafail, and he did place the asion 
on his head, and the mantle laid he over him ; and he 
did return before him even to the door of the high 

V QJ ii R 



242 CHRONICLES 

chamber. And Siorna took his seat on the throne. 

And Siorna did shew favour unto the priests, and 
he thought to humble the Olam before them; and 
they seated the thought in his mind, and guarded it 
there, that his many years were given unto him from 
13aal, by the words of the priests. 

And they said unto him, " A prince of the race of 
lolar the first Erimionn shall \\\\e Ardri for ever." 

And they whispered in the ear one of the other, 
and from their lips a voice stole over the land, say- 
ing, " Jt were good in the sight of Baal that his ser- 
vants had houses durable, and secret chambers round 
about, to tell the wonders of Baal, and receive 
offerings." 

And to bring these to pass was the whole of the 
desire of Siorna. 

When Labra had ruled eight rings Siorlai died, 
and M'in was chosen Ard Olam of Ullad. 

Ultadenjoyeth repose; Labra is the delight of the 
children of the land. 

And when he ruled eleven rings he died, and Ard+ 
fear his brother was chosen. 

And when Iber had ruled in Mumain one score 
and fourteen rings, he ceased, and Noid his son was 
placed on the seat of his father, 

And the priests of Ullad did come, now one, now 
another, unto Dun Sobairce; and they sought to drop 
words secretly into the ear of Ardfear, but Ardjear 
would not receive them in that sort. 

And tliey spake in the presence of me Min, of the 
priests of Gaehn, and the desire of-Ardri towards 
them ; but nought of the priests of Ullad at this time. 

But Ardjear having died when he had ruled for 



OF ERI. 243 

six rings, and Slat the son of Labra being chosen ; 
and being young, and his mind not known, 

And Noid king of Mumain having ceased, when 
he had sat five rings, Roiteactac the son of Roan the 
brother of Iber being chosen, 

When the assembly were together on Tobrad, 
what time Siorna had ruled nineteen rings, 

Siorna rose, and said, 

" Ard Cruimlear and divers of the priests have 
come unto me, and they have said, 

" Baal is above all, the priests are his servants, 
the keepers of his secret will on earth ; Baal did 
speak unto the nine Cruimtear from the beginning, 
saying, 

" As I rule the heavens, the earth, the waters, and 
the air, so let the heads of all nations rule the Goal 
under me. 

" And Baal will speak unto the priests, and the 
priests will tell his words unto the people; and the 
words of Baal issuing from the mouth of the priests 
shall be for laws unto kings and people; am I not 
Duetim ?"(c) 

And moreover Ard Cruimtear added, 

" Liafail and the lots belong to Baal, they are for 
signs of his will. 

" And as the nine laws to the nine priests are from 
Baal, so should all the laws of man be consented to 
by the servants of Baal oi\ earth, 

" Therefore, 

" What if nine of the Cruimtear from each of the 
nations of the Gaal in Eri sit in the high chamber 
of Tmcmor on Tobrad, and hold talk, and raise up 
their right hands, for times to come?" 

R 2 



244 CHRONICLES 

And Blat king in Ullad rose, and said, 

" Jf the words of Ard Cruimtear repeated by the 
king be the truth, the priests are lords of the earth ; 
kings, princes, nobles, and Gaal are but their ser- 
vants. 

" What the thoughts of others are, Blat knoweth 
not, for himself he will say, 

" Blat the son of JLabra, the son of Cairlre, the 
son of Eocaid Olam Fodla, of the race of Er, son of 
the hero, sitteth on the seat of the king in Ullad, the 
choice of the princes and nobles of Ullad, in the pre- 
sence of the children of the land ; 

" Jf the words of Ard Cruimtear be the truth, let 
us leave our seats for the servants of Baal. 

" Do not words stand on the roll of the laws, 
Let not a priest enter into the high chamber of 
Teacmor for ever? Let them tend the fires, and note 
seasons. 

" Should it not be told the reason why these words 
are to be blotted out, and the words of the king set 
down ? 

" IfArdri would speak." 

All waited for the king. 

But the head of Siorna lay on the side of the 
throne, sleep had crept over him. 

And Oliola the son of Aongus the son of Siorna 
rose gently from his seat, and spread his mantle be- 
fore his father, and the noise of the foot of Oliola 
awaked Ardri. 

And when Oliola returned to his place, Blat rose, 
and said, 

" What if the words on the roll of the laws stand 
as they stand ?" 



OF ERI. 245 

And it was so. 

And all the writings were read day after day. 

None stood on Tobrad for justice. 

And the doors of the high chamber were closed. 

And when Siorna had ruled Ardri for the course 
of one score rings, he ceased. 

And the priests whispered that Siorna had been 
smitten of Baal, for that he did not perform the pro- 
mises he did make unto them. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER I. 

() The reasoning of Labra is correct. To talk of an irrevocabk 
constitution is absurd, save and except those grand principles of na- 
ture on which ail primitive institutions must be founded. These 
never should be touched, yet are they always, invaded one after ano- 
ther as the society advances from its simple to an highly artificial 
state ; nought but names and forms sufl'ered to exist. 

(6) The old king was witty the name of his ancestor, the son of 
Eocaid Golam, had been lolar, which means the eagle a long-lived 
bird ; and though Siorna was now past four score, a great age for 
man it was but the prime of the eagle. 

(c) Duetim means the head of the elements. 



CHAP. II. 

,The reign of Roiteactac of the race oflber. a space 
of seven rings, from 558 to 551. 

Now Siorna having ceased, the princes and nobles 
were called together, to the mount of Gaclen, end 
Gialcad the son of Oliola, the son of Siorna, was 
chosen king in Gaelen. 



246 



CHRONICLES 



And when the assembly of Eri were on TobraJ, 
Roiteactac the son of Roan king in Mumain was 
seated on the throne of Eri. 

He was skilled in the manner of working of wood, 
and iron and brass; he taught how stuff was to be 
made from weeds of the earth, and he had thongs of 
leather instead of the staff of Cran Tubal; he did 
open the womb of the earth, and had iron and brass 
therefrom. 

Moreover he improved the structure of the car, 
and there were two pieces on the front of the car, 
and one horse moved between the pieces, and one 
horse on this side, and one horse on that side him of. 

And when Roiteactac had ruled seven rings, he 
went into Mumain, as was his custom ring after ring, 
to look after the workers in the mines of the earth, 
within the mountains in the southern extremity of 
the world of land. (a) 

And as he did look upon a worker in iron, a 
spark red hot did fly into his left eye, and he lan- 
guished miserably for six days, when he died. 

And his heap was raised amongst the mountains 
that stand between the flood of Iber and the great 
concourse of the waters of the salt sea.(#) 

NOTES TO CHAPTER II. 

(a) There is abundance of copper found in those mountains 
now. 

(6) His heap stands in Cluannarath at this day. 



OF ERI. 247 

CHAP. III. 

The reign of Elim of Jber, a space of one ring, from 
551 to 550. 

WHEN Elim the son of Roiteaciac heard that his 
father was no more, Elim was at Teacmor, for Siorna 
dwelt within the house all the days he ruled Ardri, 
as did Roiteactac, save when he did journey at set 
seasons to Mumain. 

Now Elim thought to sit on the throne, and con- 
tinued to abide on Tobrad. 

And when the princes and chiefs of Mumain saw 
not Elim, letters were sent forth, calling the assem- 
\}]y to the mount of that land. 

And Failbe the son of Roan was chosen king in 
Mumain. 

And the words of Elim were fcill of wrath thereat, 
and he did say, " When 1 shall he Ardri, Failbe 
shall feel the sharpness of my sword." 

And when the kings and princes and nobles were 
together on Tobrad, according to the words of the 
messengers, lo, the doors of the high chamber of 
Teacmor were yet closed. 

And words were told unto each secretly, Elim 
hath words for thy ear in the chamber of the king. 

And of the princes and nobles of Mumain, and 
some few of the nobles of Gaelen, did enter unto 
Elim; J3lat, and the princes and nobles of Ullad 
abiding in their tents on Tobrad. 

And after this manner was Elim said to be cho- 
sen Ardri ! 

And when Gialcad king in Gaelen found that the 



248 CHRONICLES 

minds of the assembly were to him wards, he bad 
the heralds of Gaelen say aloud on Tobrad, 

" The throne of Eri is empty." 

And the princes and nobles of Gaelen did choose 
Gialcad to rule Ardri. 

And all moved to the land of their dwelling. 

Now Elim was in streights on every side, and he 
moved as one having a theft on him towards the 
tents of Failbe, and Elim said unto Failbe, 

" We be brethren of Jber, let no strife be between 
thee and me, sit thou on the seat of the king in Mum- 
ain, only help me to the throne of Eri. 

(t Er hath the Datum; and Firgneat, such as they 
be, are with him : the eagle soareth above the horse- 
man. 

" If Iber be two now, soon and Iber will be 
nought." 

And Failbe gave the hand of promise unto Elim; 
and Elim tarried in Mum am with the name of Ardri. 

And the heralds went through Ultad and Gaelen, 
saying, 

" Let the warriors stand round Gialcad, Ardri, on 
Tobrad, out of hand." 

And JBlat stood in the midst of the host of 
Ullad, and they moved towards Tobrad, 

And whilst the men of UUad and the men of 
Gaelen were moving towards Mwnain, the warriors 
of Mumain were in motion towards Gaelen, for Elim 
said, " Marcac will stand on Gaelen ere lolar pounce 
upon him. r () 

And when the warriors came in sight of each 
other, and the heralds of Gaelen had said aloud in 
the hearing of Elim t 



OF ERI. 49 

" Let no foot stand in the way of Ardri whilst he 
moveth to chastise the pride of Elim" 

Elim strode before the host, and when he came 
nigh unto Gialcad, he said, " What shadow of a 
king is that I see ?" 

Now Gialcad was very tall and very thin; 

And Gialcad answered, 

" Neither thing nor shadow ere long will Elim be; 
short will the time till thy shade Elim shall be no 
more seen on earth !" 

And short was the time; ere the words had well 
been spoken Elim was no more. 

And Gialcad took the asion of Ardri from off the 
head, and the mantle had he stripped from off the 
shoulders of Elim, and he threw it over his own 
shoulders. 

And the weight of Elim was borne to Mumain, 
and his heap raised ; but Elim was not lamented. 

(a) In English this may be rendered thus : 
" The horseman will stand on Gaelen, ere the eagle pounce 
upon him." 



CHAP. IV. 

The reign of Gialcad the son o/'Oleola the son of 
Siorna, Ardri, a course of nine rings, from 550 to 
541. 

Now Elim had ceased, and the assembly of Eri 
were together on Tobrad. 

And Gialcad seated himself on the throne. 



250 CHRONICLES 

And he rose therefrom, and said, " The name of 
Elim standeth on the roll of the kings of Eri. 'Twere 
well the matter be inquired into, when the doors 
shall be next opened." 

And Teiu chief of Oldanmact rose and said, 

"If Oldanmact pay tribute, it is fitting the Danan 
know to whom. 

" Why is the seat of the king of Gaelen empty? 
Why sitteth Gialcad on the throne?" 

And Blat said, " Tein sayeth well. 

" What if Gialcad take the seat of the king of 
Gaelen ?" 

And it was so. 

And Blat, still standing, said, 

" What if Gialcad king in Gaelen rule, Ardri?" 

And all held up their right hands: and Gialcad 
went forth to Liajail ; but Blat, nor one of the 
princes, nor nobles, nor Olam, nor heads of the peo- 
ple of Ulladj departed from their seats. 

And Gialcad was seated on the throne. 

And Glas chief of Eadcn Dair rose, and said, 

"If Ardri would repeat the words concerning 
Elimr 

And Gialcad did repeat the words; and the assem- 
bly went forth, and feasts and sports were as afore- 
time. 

And when the assembly were together on the high 
chamber, 

Fearmor chief of Cumar rose, and said, 

" Why standeth Elim on the line of kings on the 
roll of Eri? He crept to the throne as the spider 
over his net. 



OF ERI. 261 

" He stole the asion, the theft found upon him. 
" He barred up the doors of the high chamber of 
jTeacmor. 

" What if the name of Elim be blotted out from 
the roll." 

And they held talk, arid anger caused many to 
say more words than words of wisdom. 

When Failbe king of Mumain rose, and said, 

" Elim was as the brother of FaMe, therefore 
should my tongue be silent in his praise. The words 
of Feannor no ear had heard did Elim live. 

" Elim moved the battle to the land of Fearmor; 
his -voice is as the sudden gust of the tempest in the 
coldness of the winter, doing mischief only. 

" Blat moved in the strength of ULlad against the 
power of Elim; the words of Slat flow as the clear 
waters of JSandaman that run by the borders of Ib 
Lugad. (a) 

" His voice is as the gentle breeze that glideth 
from the sun about to descend into the world of 
waters; he speaketh words of truth and wisdom. 

" If Blat would speak/' 

Now the eyes of all were turned to Blat; he rose, 
and said, 

" The things Elim hath done, the friend of EUm 
must say, well they had not been done. Elim hath 
transgressed, and he hath paid the Eric with his 
life. 

*' The time of EUm was short, his weight is be- 
neath the heap, his spirit extinguished for ^yer. 

44 Not so the spirit of Roiteactac nis father; of 
the spirit of Roiteactac all feel a portion, who take 
delight in curious works of the hands of men. 



252 CHRONICLES 

" Elim was not seated on the throne as became 
the king of Eri; nevertheless, there are no words on 
the roll of the laws forbidding those things which 
Elim hath done. 

" Perad venture it did not enter into the mind of 
Eocaid Olam Fodla, the wise and just, that such a 
thing could have been thought upon by one of the 
race. 

u As no words are yet, Elim hath committed nr 
transgression: how can one go beyond what is not? 

" Gialcad was not Ardri till nine days now 
passed. 

" Let it not be heard said in times to come, that 
Eri was without a ruler for one entire ring. 

" What then if Elim stand after his father ? 

" And that words be now added to the words iu 
the roll of the laws, 

" Let none hinder one of the assembly of Eri to 
enter into the high chamber of Teacmor on Tobrad 
when called thereto ; 

" Let none be prevented on the way towards the 
assembly of Eri for justice." (&) 

And all the assembly stood up, and they pre- 
sented their right hands towards the king of E/7- 
lad. 

And Eagat, Ard Olam of Eri, said aloud, 

" Doth not the spirit of Eocaid Olam Fodla abide 
with Slat ? May it be immortal !" 

And the words of Slat were added to the words 
on the roll of the laws of Eri. 

When Gialcad had ruled seven rings, Failbe king 
in Mumain died, and Airt the son of Roiteactae was 
chosen. 



OF ERI. 253 

And Gialcad ruled nine rings: he was a vain 
man, whose mind delighted in trifles, or worse. Hath 
he not made it his boast and his glory how he did 
slay Elim the son of Iber ? O shame ! 

NOTES TO CHAPTER IV. 

(fl) This river is at this day railed Bandaman, pronounced Ban- 
don, on whose bank I was horn and reared up. 
6 Now these two laws were addtd on the roll. 



CHAP. v. 

The reign of Airt the son of Roiteactac of I he race 
of Iber, a space of twelve rings, Jrotn 54 1 to 521). 

J\ UAD was chosen king in Gaelen in the place of 
Gialcad his brother. 

And when the assembly of Eri Mere together, 
Airt the son of Roileactac was chosen Ardri. 

And IBlat returned to Uilad, and he had cars 
made like unto those made under the eye of Roi- 
leactac. 

And what time Baal was in the third chamber of 
Tionnscnad, Dlat took his departure to the tents of 
the chief of Mag-mis, and princes ot'Utlad, and Olam, 
and bards, and minstrels accompanied him. 

And Blat did raise his tents nigh unto the tents 
of the chief; and he bad him to his boards And 
when he had tarried in that Tanaislcas four days, 
he moved to the south, and thus did he make a cir- 
cuit of UllacL 

For he said* 



254 CHRONICLES 

" The sound of the voice of the chiefs of Ullad 
reached to the ear of Oilliol, saying, 

" The course of the king consumeth the land :" 
and Oilliol was stayed, saying, " Let the princes 
and chiefs, yea all come to Dun Sobairce. 

" Blat will not stay his course, he will go through 
the plains and over the hills, and move on the wa- 
ters of the depths of Ullad at the charge of the 
king. Let the people gather themselves about the 
tents of Blatr 

And they did come round the king, and his spirit 
was rejoiced, and the hearts of the children of Ullad 
were made glad. 

And the king entered the schools, and he con- 
versed with the Olam and with the youths, and he 
was pleased. 

And the assembly of Ullad were called to the 
mount. 

And words were added to the words on the roll 
of Ullad, 

" Let no hindrance be towards the mount of Ullad 
what time the assembly shall be together." 

And when Blat had ruled one score and three 
rings, Min died, and Allo was chosen Ard Olam of 
Ullad. 

And when Blat had ruled one score and six rings, 
he died. 

And all Ullad mourned for him ; he ruled in jus- 
tice and wisdom, exceeded not by any of the race of 
ErL 

And the assembly of Ullad were called to the 
mount; but Cairbre the sou of Blat was not on the 
mount, he remained in Dun Sobairce. 



OF ERJ. 255 

And thither did the princes and nobles move: 
and when it was told unto Cairbre, the desire of 
Uilad is towards Cairbre, he said, " The voice of 
Ultad shall be obeyed." 

And a horse was led forth for Cairbre to ride to 
the mount; but he said, " Nay, Cairbre will walk. 
Let him keep his feet whiles he may ; pride cometh 
over one ere he is aware, and puffeth him up." 

And Cairbre was chosen. 

And I Allo did raise my voice, and said, " Cair- 
bre will prove himself worthy of his race." 

And Cairbre said, " Jt is in the writings of Eo- 
caid Olam Fodla, * Flattery rnaketh man blind.' 
When the heap shall be raised over Cairbre, let him 
be judged in truth." 

And I Allo felt reproved for the words I had 
spoken ; howbeit, rny spirit was exalted for the wis- 
dom of the king. 

And Cairbre hath made the circuit of Ullad each 
of the three rings he hath ruled, after the manner of 
his father. 

Teacmor is without inhabitants, save when the 
assembly are thereat. 

Airt is full of the spirit of his father, his mind in- 
quireth after strange matters. 

He hath caused water to flow, where before his 
time it was not: he maketh courses for the waters 
and conh'neth them, raising them, wonderful to be- 
hold. 

His tents he encompasseth with piles of earth; 
and what though they do stand above the waters 
as they flowed afore, he doth lead the waters to his 
very Rath. 



256 CHRONICLES 

This I Allo say, for I did see the thing in 
main. 

Therefore is he called in Mumain, Imlioc and 
Ratlin. 

And he ruled, Ardri, for the course of twelve rings, 
then did he cease. 



CHAP. VI. 

The reign of Nuad, a space of thirteen years, from 
529 to 516. 



ceased, and the assembly called to the 
mount of Mumain did choose Breas the sou of 
Elim. 

And Nuad the king of Gaelen, son of Oliola son 
of Siorna was seated on the throne of Eri. 

And when he had ruled four rings, Allo died, and 
Urla was chosen Ard Olam of U/lad. 

Nuad hath passed through thirteen rings : his eyes 
on the earth, his ear towards the lips of the priests, 
his mind ranging through the pathless region of the 
air. 

His soul delighteth not in music nor the chase: 
in the tales of the fancies of the priests alone doth he 
take pleasure. 

Breas had taken Aorta the sister of Nuad: those 
of Gaelen whom the priests do not sway doth Breas 
rule. 

If Breas did not encourage the Olam to pour les- 
sons of wisdom into the minds of the youth, he did 
lead them to the chase ; and mirth, and music, and 



OF ERI. 257 

the dance, were not suffered to slumber in Mumain, 
nor to cease in Gaelen altogether. 

Ullad hath been in repose, Cairbre departeth not 
from the ways of Eocaid Olam Fodla. 

Nuad abided within Teacmor on Tobrad conti- 
nually, yet the assembly were called together each 
ring after four rings, 

And the writings read, according to the words of 
the law. 

And when Nuad had sat as king for thirteen 
rings he died, little remaining of Nuad but his name 
on the roll of kings. 



CHAP. VJf. 

The reign of Breas the son of Elim of Iber, a space 
of nine rings, from 516 to 507. 

AODA the son of Nuad was chosen king in Gae- 
len. 

And Breas the son of Elim of the race of Iber 
was Ardri. 

Now when Cairbre had ruled one score rings and 
four, it happed on a day a small vessel was driven 
on the strand of the great incourse of waters, that 
runneth towards the sun-setting, beneath Dun So- 
bairce; and therein were six young men and a lad. 

The wind had driven them on the waves from the 
land on the other side of the narrow sea, that lieth 
towards the sun's rising. 

And the distress of the men was espyed by Neilte 
and his children ; and they hasted with Serb, a 

VOL. II. S 



258 CHRONICLES 

neighbour of Neilte, to help those from the sea, and 
they brought them safe to the land. 

And Neilte conducted the strangers to his hut, 
and the woman of Neilte did spread food before 
them. 

And as they did speak one to the other, the men 
of Ullad did understand their speech. 

And Neilte said unto the youths, when they had 
eaten and were refreshed, " Whence came ye?" 

And one answered and said, " We be of Tain 
Breoccean." 

And Neilte said, " If it be thy will we will go 
with thee to the house of the king." And the young 
men were sore afeard. 

And the woman of Neilte said (when she saw they 
were afeard, and heard them saying, " Take us not 
thither,") " Fear nothing; the father who begat thee., 
no, nor the mother that bare thee, will treat thee 
more tenderly : happy is the one that standeth in 
the presence of the king of Ullad." 

And Neilte, and the woman of Neilte, and Serb, 
.with the six young men and the lad, moved towards 
Dun Sobairce, and what time they reached the 
house of the king, Cairbre had gone a hunting. 

And when he returned from the chase, and heard 
of the men, he said, 

" Let care be taken of the men, and all who have 
come with them, in the tents of the king." 

And when it was told unto Cairbre, " The minds 
of the strangers are in trouble, in fear of the king,'* 
Cairbre said, " Let them come unto me." 

And when they were before Cairbre, and he saw 
fear on them, he said, smiling on the men, unto 



OF ERI. 269 

Neilte, " Say unto them, Fear nothing, repose in 
peace under cover of the tents of the king ; tomorrow 
he will speak unto you." 

And on the morrow Cairbre bad, " Let the men 
from the sea be called unto me." And I Urla was 
with the king, the chronicles of Ullad before me. 

And the six young men and the lad, and Neilte, 
and Serb, did enter into the chamber of the king; 
and when it was told unto Cairbre, the woman of 
Neilte abideth alone at the entrance of the tents of 
the king, 

Cairbre said, " Let the woman come hither also, 
and hear the tale of the men whom she hath helped 
to deliver from the dangers of the waves." 

And Cairbre was seated, and I Urla sat near unto 
the king. 

And when the woman of Neilte entered the cham- 
ber, and she and the men stood before the king, 

Cairbre said, 

" The tale oft told delighteth the ear of the hearer 
for the first time, yet doth it tire the spirit of the re- 
later. 

" Let all sit." 

And the strangers looked in amazement one on 
another: and the woman of Neilte said unto the 
youths, " Why lay you not down ? Did ye not hear 
the words of the king ?" And all sat down on the 
ground. 

And Cairbre said, "Whence came ye?" 

And one of the young men stood up before the 
king, and he raised his voice, and said, 

" This one is my brother, and these two be bre- 

s 2 



260 CHRONICLES 

thren, and these two also ; and the lad is the son of 
my sister. 

" And long time hath not passed since a damsel, 
the sister of the mother of this lad, as she happed to 
abide alone in the dwelling of her brethren till they 
should return from the hills, a company of youths 
bore off the maid on the waves of the sea that roll 
towards lmenar.(d) 

" Of those who saw what happed, and heard the 
Toice of the damsel calling on the name of her mo- 
ther, and for us her brethren, some did run in search 
of us, and we did call together these the sons of the 
brethren of our father. 

" And we floated our vessel on the waters of the 
sea ; and ere long time the winds blew loud, and 
they did drive our boat, whose strength did equal 
not the labour of the waves, out of the way that 
leadeth towards Imenar, till it did rush upon the 
shore of the land on which I stand before the 

king." 

And Neilte and Serb knew more of the words 
spoken by the young man, than the king or Urla, 
and Neilte did make clear all the words unto us. 

And when the young man had made an end, the 
lad rose up, and he did stand by the side of Cairbre, 
and say unto him piteously, " If the king would 
send us away, that we may seek after Inta, on whose 
knee Moran was brought up." 

And Cairbre said unto the lad tenderly, " To- 
morrow thou shalt go, my child." 

And Cairbre did speak words unto Neilte, and 
Neilte did speak to the men, if they knew ought of 
whence their fathers came? 



OF EHI. 261 

And the young men, now one, now another, said, 

" We be of the Gaal of Breoccean in Gaelag ; 
our great fathers came in ships of the merchants to 
Breotain." 

And Cairbre inquired what they knew of Gae- 
lag. 

And the men said, " Our great fathers came from 
thence to work in the womb of the earth, and the 
merchants thought to captivate them. 

" And our fathers of those days brake forth, and 
left the caverns of the world, and moved towards the 
fingers of Baal, on the waters of the deep, and dwelt 
where we do dwell." 

And Cairbre asked of the king of the land ; but 
the men knew of none such, only they heard that 
those over them had others greater than they. 

And the king asked of the battle. They had 
heard of the battle. They lived nigh unto the waters 
of the salt sea, and the sound of the battle was far 
from them. 

And many more things were inquired of them, 
but little did they know ; and what though they did 
dwell beside the sea, they had not been within Ime- 
nar, though they did know the name thereof. 

And Cairbre said unto them, " Abide in the tents 
of the king this day, with the woman and the men of 
JSri, to-morrow ye may depart/' 

And Cairbre said unto Urla, " Bid that all things 
needful be given unto the men, let them want for 
nothing, far from the sound of the voice their ears 
are accustomed to hear hi the land of their kin- 
dred." 

And the king gave a present of cloth to the wo- 



262 CHRONICLES 

man of Neilte t and six beautiful heifers gave he unto 
Neilte, and the like unto Serb, saying, 

" Take these as a token of thanks from the king, 
for the kindness ye have shewn to the seafaring ones 
of our race in a strange land." 

And the youths of Tain Breoccean raised up their 
hands, and besought Baal to prosper all the times of 
the king. 

And they went their way. 

And when they did return to the dwelling of 
Neilte, and made inquiry after their vessel, lo, a boat 
of the king was ready with all things needful for 
them. 

And the boat of the king was floated on the wa- 
ters of Foiste : 

And the young men and the lad entered therein, 
in the sight of a great congregation of the children 
of Ullad ; and they moved on the face of the waters 
towards the sun's rising, comforted, save for Inta y 
the thought of whom did pain their spirit. 

At this time an huge portion from the shoulder of 
Ronard was loosed from his bulk, and it did sepa- 
rate therefrom, and was moved down his immense 
side, nor stopped in his course till it reached the 
plain beneath, over part of the surface whereof it 
did spread itself. 

And it did happen in the darkness of th6 night, 
and three tents of the Gaol were laid thereby, and 
all therein perished, nor did so much of the parted 
abide together as to have a name (). 

Now the time was that the assembly should be 
together on Tobrad, and Calrbre went thither ;* and 
whilst he abided on Tobrad, the winds and rains 



OF ERI. 263 

were excessive, and Cairbre did need to lay within 
his tent for many days. 

And he became worse from his desire to be in 
Ullad; and Urla sought to stay him till his strength 
should return, in vain; and we did move towards 
Dun Sobairce, Min chief of Ard Deas in company 
with the king. 

And we did reach the tents of Ard Deas, no far- 
ther did Cairbre go. And when he felt his end nigh 
unto, he said unto Min, and unto me Urla, " When 
1 shall cease, let me be laid in this land : is not Ard 
Deas of Ullad?" 

And Cairbre breathed for the last time within the 
arms of Urla. 

And words passed from Min to the ears of the 
princes, and nobles, and Olam, and heads of the 
people on Tobrad, that Cairbre was no more. 

And when Breas did hear of what had happed, 
he bad the heralds to call the assembly together 
within the high chamber of Teacmor. 

Arid when all were together, Ardri rose, and 
said, 

" Cairbre, king that was in Ullad, is no more, he 
lieth in the tents of Min in Ard Deas ; Sreas will 
stand at the heap of Cairbre" 

And all rose up, and all said, " All will walk in 
the steps of Ardri.' 9 

And when the day came that the kings, princes, 
and nobles, and a mighty congregation were gathered 
together to move towards Ard Deas, 

And when the kings, princes, and nobles of Mu- 
main, and of Gaelen, and the chief and nobles of Ol- 
danmact, were seen with their swords and shields, 



264 CHRONICLES 

Fionn the first-born of Cairbre raised his voice, and 
said, 

" If the swords and shields were to abide on 7V 
brad, Cairbre is to be laid in Ullad. The spirit of 
Cairbre did delight in peace, no war-song must be 
heard. The eyes of the children of Ullad have never 
beheld the arms of the warriors whilst their ears 
hear the death-song of the chief." 

And the swords and the shields abided on Tobrad, 
and the mantles were girded close, and the congre- 
gation moved on their way. 

And the heap of Cairbre was raised, and I Urla 
did raise the death-song of the king; the words are 
Tvords of Fearadan of Ard Deas, are they not laid 
up amongst the writings of the bards of Mur Oiamain 
of Dun Sobairce ? 

And Ardri, and all of Mumain, and of Gaelen re- 
turned to Tobrad, we of Ullad moved to the land of 
our dwelling. 

And the assembly of Ullad were called together, 
and Fionn the son of Cairbre was chosen. 

And when Fionn had ruled for one ring, as I 
Urla did sit with the king in his chamber within 
Dun Sobairce, he said unto ine, " Have the words 
of the chronicles been looked upon in Mur Oiamain 
before they be heard on the mount ?" 

And I answered, " Nay." 

And the king answered, " Let the time of Cairbre 
be read unto me." And they were read. 

And the king said, " It is well I had desired to 
hear the words. Urla hath not set down the tale of 
the young chiefs of Mis and Clannadon, their con- 
stancy in friendship, their fervency in love.'* 



OF EIU. 265 

And Urla answered, " The tale is of the writing 
of the bards, and layeth in Mur Olamain of Dun 
Sobairce" 

" Nor do I see mention made of the portion of 
Ronard, that loosed his shoulder from him, spread- 
ing over the plain." 

And the words of the king were right, and I made 
the addition in the presence of the king in its due 
time, standing out from the writing set down afore- 
time. 

And when Breas had ruled nine rings, he died. 

And his name is set down on the roll of kings, 
calling him Breasrig. 

For he said, " Elim my father was Ardri; 

" Breas is the son of a king." 

NOTES TO CHAPTER VII. 

(a) Imenar means the Isle of Man. 

(b] In the original the memorial of this event is written on a slip 
of skin attached to the roll. 



CHAP. VIII. 

The reign of Eocaid the son of Fionn, of the line of 
. Ith, prince of Ib Lugad, Ardri, a space of one 
ring, from 507 to 506. 

DUAC the brother of Breasrig was chosen king in 
Mumain. 

The desire of Eri was towards Fionn king in 
Ullad t that he should rule Ardri; but Fionn was 
then on his bed, and sickness appeared in the simi- 
litude of death. 



266 CHRONICLES 

And Eocaid the son of Fionn of 1th was chosen 
Ardri. 

And when full thirteen moons had been complete, 
and two days more, Eocaid ceased, his flesh having 
corrupted whilst he yet lived. 



CHAP. IX. 



The reign of Fionn the son of Cairbre, Ardri, a 
space of one score rings, from 506 to 486. 



being dead, Fionn king in Uttad was 
chosen Ardri with one voice. 

And when the assembly of Eri separated, he moved 
towards Dun Sobairce, and he hath abided in Ullad 
continually, now three rings since he was chosen 
Ardri. 

He hath made the circuit of Ullad ring after ring 
at the charge of the king, he maketh Eocaid Olam 
Fodla the guide of all his steps; Fionn hath not 
been surpassed by one of the race. 

All his words are words of truth : 

All his ways are ways of justice. 

Now it happed on a day when Baal was two days 
in the second chamber of his house Meas, when Fionn 
had ruled Eri for three rings, that there were seen 
moving towards Dun Sobairce a man and two youths 
in habits of warriors, their shields on their right arms, 
their swords at their backs, they came in peace. 

And three men followed their steps, bearing spears 
and axes ; and when they came into the presence 
of the king, the man said, 



OF ERI. 267 

" Tirlorg the son of Glas, of the heads of the 
people of Tain Breoccean, standeth before the king. 
This youth is a son of Breint chief of Eirbal; and 
this lad is the son of the sister of the chief. 

Four rings have now passed since men were driven 
on the waves of the sea from Tain Breoccean to this 
land, according to words now heard by Breint; and 
how a mighty king did rule the children of this land ; 
and that they were of the Gaol of /for, clan of Breoc- 
cean, behind Buasce, the place of the dwelling of 
our fathers, times long gone. 

" And hither have we come from Breint, to tell 
unto the king, The enemy of the Gaol abide in 
houses durable, gathered together by our side to the 
su's strength, and in the sight of our right eye; and 
the sea is behind us, and the tents of the Gaol are 
spread thinly over the face of the land to the sun's 
rising, whither their brethren know not. 

<3' 

And the Gaal of Iber go forth one against the 
other, and their enemies are knitted together. 

" Therefore hath Breint sent us hither to say unto 
the chief of this land, 

" Help thy brethren against their enemies in their 
land, and they will be helping unto thee against the 
foeman that troubleth thy borders." 

And when he had made an end, the men who had 
followed his steps did place an axe and a spear be- 
fore Fionn, Tirlorg saying, " Behold the arms of 
those who come to Battle against the Gaal." 

And Fionn said, " It standeth on the roll of the 
laws of Eri, 

** Let not the Gaal go forth of Eri 



268 CHRONICLES 

" These are the words of the law, therefore no co- 
venant but of peace can be between us." 

Moreover Fionn added, 

" Though the children of Eri may not go forth, 
peradventure your time hath not been mispent, if 
ye bear back words of good counsel to the children 
of thy land, and say unto them, Thus said Fionn 
king in Ullad, and of Eri. 

" Gaol of Iber, clan of Breoccean, leave the dan- 
gerous bye-paths of discord, and move in the safe 
broad way of harmony, the hands and hearts of one, 
cleaving unto the hands and hearts of the other, each 
to each, all to all. 

" Thus do, and when it shall be known amongst 
the host that streighten thy borders, if they cease not 
to trouble thee, and yet spread themselves over the 
face of the land of thy dwelling, to do hurt, 

" The union of your force will cause them to re- 
pent, and they will cease, or ye are not able to con- 
tend with them : then will they be thy masters, ye 
will be the servants of thy foe, then the measure of ser- 
vitude will not depend on you. 

" Hear the words of Eocaid Olam Fodla y the wise 
and just, 

" The road to servitude is easy, but the way there- 
from is steep, hard to be climbed. .It is difficult to 
regain a precious thing once lost." 

And Fionn inquired concerning Breint. 

" He is the son of Drom from Bluas ; he who led 
the Gaal from the bowels of the earth in the southern 
extremity of the land. 

" And the priests are next to Breint, and the 
chiefs do nought without their knowledge." 



OF ERJ. 



269 



And Fionn asked of the roll of the chronicles of 
the Gaal, but Tirlorg knew not of such ; all that was 
known amongst the people came from mouth to ear; 
all their knowledge was a tale soon told. 

And Fionn said, " Ye will tarry with me for 
days." And the boards were spread ; and joy and 
mirth abounded, and the song and the dance, and 
the voice of the harp was heard ; and the tale of 
other times. 

And the tale of Sana and Fearmor was sung, how 
that she came over the waves of the sea from Dun- 
meanac, great with the child of Fearmor, that the 
babe may draw his first breath in the hearing of her 
mother, pining for the absence of her distant child. 

And the hunters were assembled, and Tirlorg and 
the youths pursued on their feet, they knew not of 
the management of the horse. 

Now the day came that Tirlorg and the youths 
were to depart, and Fionn bad, 

" Let three cars be made ready. " And Tirlorg 
rode with the king, and one car bare the youths, and 
in the other car were placed presents for Breint ; 
and many chiefs rode on their horses in company of 
the king; and two dogs followed the huntsmen of 
the king, for the youth the son of Breint. 

And the king, and Tirlorg, and the youths came 
down from the cars, and as they and many of the 
nobles moved towards the vessel of Tirlorg, that 
swung to and fro on the surface of the waters of 
Foiste, Fionn said to Tirlorg, 

" It grieveth me to think that ignorance lieth so 
heavily on the bosom of the land of the children of 
the Gaol in Tain Breoccean. 



270 CHRONICLES 

" When thou shalt stand in the midst of the people 
of thy race, say unto them, 

" What though the king in Ullad may not send 
unto us men of war, he will, if so it seemeth good 
unto us, send hither messengers of peace, the teach- 
ers of lessons of wisdom, that we may be instructed 
to read the writings of JEolus, and Eteerial, and Eo- 
caid Olam Fodla. 

" The words of the spirit of those whose weight 
lieth beneath the heap, that teach man to bind the 
madness of his passions in the cincture of reason, 
with the clasp of reflection. 

" Guides for his steps through the course of his 
days ; he that followeth them will live as a man 
ought to live, and when his form shall lack the fire 
f animation, his name shall be remembered in the 
tales of his time. And if he hath done great things, 
his spirit will abide amongst men, whilst memory of 
mighty actions shall endure. 

" Eight score rings are now complete since the 
form ofJEocaid Olam Fodla was laid under the heap; 
his form is no more. 

" The maggots of its production have consumed 
the flesh of his bulk, his bones will again be blended 
with their kindred elements ; but the fire of his spirit 
is immortal, that will never perish." 

And as Fionn spoke, his words were enough 
understood by the strangers, that they knew the 
meaning thereof. 

And all eyes gazed on Fionn, all ears were so in- 
tent 011 his words, that all forgot to move towards the 
ship. 

At length Fionn said, " Peradventure neither Tir 



OF ERI. 271 

lorg nor these youths can bear in mind all the king 
in TJllad hath spoken ; therefore he will charge their 
memories but with these words, 

" Let not the Gaol go forth of Tain Breoccean 
to vex strange nations, and should the Gaol of other 
lands enter Eirbal, let the warriors be of one mind, 
and as one arm to drive the foeman forth, or give 
them graves within Tain Breoccean. This do, and 
fear not." 

And Fionn gave the hand of friendship to Tir- 
lorg ; and he embraced the youths tenderly, and he 
said unto them, 

" May the light of reason guide your steps in all 
your ways !" 

And the vessels of Tirlorg moved on the waters. 

And Fionn and his company returned to Dun So- 
bairce. 

And now the time came when the assembly of Eri 
were together on Tobrad. 

And Morda chief of Mag Lein rose, and said, 

" Men from a strange land came unto Dun So- 
bairce, and abided many days with Ardri, what if 
inquiry be made touching this thing? 

" If Ardri would speak ?" 

And Fionn rose, and said, " Urla Ard Olam of 
Ullad will read, in the hearing of the assembly all 
the words that tell of that matter." 

And Urla rose, and said, " The words are in Mur 
Olamain of Teacmor, on the morrow Urla will bear 
them hither." 

And on the morrow Urla rose, and he did read all 
the words on the chronicles, from the time that Tir- 



272 CHRONICLES 

lorg did come to Dun Sobairce, till he did enter into 
his boat, and take his departure. 

And when Urla had made an end, all the assem- 
bly rose, and presented their right hands to Ardri. 

And Denan Ard Olam of Teacmor said aloud, 

" Of a truth the spirit of Eocaid Olam Fodla abid- 
eth with Fionn the son ofCairbre." 

And when Fionn had ruled seven rings Urla died, 
and Beirid was chosen Ard Olam of Ullad. 

And when Fionn had ruled eleven rings, Aoda 
king in Gaelen ceased, having sat during one score 
rings and one, and Oliol his son was chosen. 

Fionn abideth on Tobrad; and he hath placed 
Seadna his son on the seat nigh unto the seat of the 
king in Ullad, and the chiefs of largael and Ardtain 
sit near unto him, yet doth Fionn come to Dun So- 
airce ring after ring, nought taketh he of any one. 

And Fionn is skilled in the harp ; and his horses 
and his dogs none can be compared with them, no 
not in Eri. 

He hath nourished the tender mind. 

He hath kept the priests within bounds ; 

And the justicer within rule. 

And he hath remitted the tribute of Oldanrnact 
every third ring. The hearts of Ullad, and ofOldan- 
mact, and of Geintir are towards him continually. 

And when Fionn had ruled for eighteen rings, he 
said unto Seadna his son, " I see the rising of a storm 
in Gaelen and in Mumain ; learn the ways of war, 
assemble the children of the land to the chase oft- 
times." 

And when Fionn had ruled nineteen rings, and 



OP ERI. 273 

the assembly of Eri were together on Tobrad, he 
suffered them not to depart for one whole rnoon ; that 
the boards were spread, and feasts and sports were 
continually. 

And on the last days boards were raised up on 
Tobrad, and Leirag chief judge of Eri ascended, 
and he read the words on the roll of the laws of 
Eri, and repeated the customs of Tainistact. 

And on the next day Denan stood on the boards, 
and he read aloud the writings of Eolus, and the 
chronicles of Gaelag. 

And on the third day I Beirid did read the chro- 
nicles of Eri. 

And gladness filled the minds of the people. 

None stood on Tobrad for justice. 

And Fionn moved with the princes and nobles, 
and the chiefs of the Olam, and the heads of the 
people towards Dun Sobairce. 

And when Baal was two days in his house 
Tiortnscnad, Fionn died at Dun Sobairce. 

No store of riches had he gathered together save 
of wisdom ; for he was wont to say, " Let not the 
king heap up possessions, they but provoke the flat- 
terer, whose tongue doth mar the ear of the hearer.' 1 

Vllad grieved, Eri was in trouble for that Fionn 
was no more. 

And his heap is raised behind the heap, beneath 
which lie Eocaid Olam Fodla and Cairbre in the 
everlasting sleep of death; but his spirit will endure 
for ever. 

Note. From these annals the fact is demonstrated that the people 
of the part of Britain now called Lancashire, were of the same race 
as the Iberian Scythians of Eri ; that their forefathers were employed 

VOL. II. T 



274 

by the Phoenicians in the mines of Cornwall, from whence 
broke away, and emigrating 1 northward entered Mersey, seated 
themselves on the banks of the Erwell, from whence they spread 
themselves over Yoikshire, Durham, Westmorland, and Cumberland, 
wbere we recognise them in the Brigantes of the Romans. 



CHAP. X. 

The reign o/* Seadna, a space of fifteen rings, from 
486 to 471. 

Now Seadna the son of Fionn was chosen king in 
Vllad. 

And the assembly of Eri were called together; 
and Seadna king in Vllad was seated on the throne 
of ErL 

When Seadna had ruled during three rings, and 
the assembly were together on 7'obrad, the storm, 
the sign of which Fionn saw in the south, began to 
howl through the land. 

And words came unto the ear of Duac the son of 
Breasrig, who had taken a sister of Seadna. 

Oliol king in Gaelen hath spoken unto Duac king 
in Mumain, and unto Lore prince of Id Lugad, 
saying, 

" Uilad hath Oldanmact, and Feargneat, therefore 
is mightier than one of us. Let us make a covenant ; 
let us three be as one." 

And the words passed from the lips of Duac the 
son of Breasrig to the ear of Seadna, and now that 
JEW was on Tobrad, Seadna did repeat the words of 
Duac unto Thqrl chief of Oldanmact ; and he. added, 
moreover, 



OP ERI. 275 

" Whilst En was in peace on every side, my fa- 
ther had my mind instructed in the ways of war, 
saying, 'Twere good a thing were known though it 
may not be practised : I see the signs of a storm from 
the south. 

" My father had a spirit of wisdom'. The storm, 
the first motion of the breath whereof he did hear 
at a distance, hath come upon us 

"Let Thorl ponder on the words of Seadna, and 
when the purpose of his mind shall be fixed, he will 
speak unto Seadna, and he will say, Thorl will abide 
in Oldanmact. 

" He will incline tin to the foes of Ullad; 

" Or " 

And Thorl answered. " The words of the mouth 
of Seadna were but uttered when the purpose of the 
mind of Thorl was fixed ; Tlwrl will stand against 
the enemies of Seadna and of Ullad. 

" Let not Seadna think Thorl 'will forget the words 
he hath spoken, or will not according thereunto, for 
that they so quickly passed his lips. No ; Thorl will 
perform that he hath said." 

And the priests began to trouble Seadna; of those 
of Mumain and of Gaelen, now one then another 
crept into Ullad y and whispered in the ear of the 
priests thereof, 

" Let us be of one mind through Eri; great good 
unto the servants of Baal will come from Gaelen. 
What if one be of Gaelen, or of Mumain, or of Ullad, 
are not all, priests of the most High?" 

And these words were told unto Geirid of the 
heads of the people of Eider Siar ; and Geirid did 

T 2 



276 CHRONICLES 

tell the words unto me Beirid, and I did send them 
by the mouth of a messenger unto the king at Teac- 
mor, for I was at Dun Sobairce. 

And when the king came into Ullad t I told unto 
him the doings of the priests. 

And Seadna said, 

" The priests may fan the fire, they cannot cool the 
heat of the warrior. 

" It is known unto thee, and unto me, that whiles 
they speak openly the words of union and of peace, 
the desire of their heart is towards discord and the 
battle. 

" The princes and nobles will not incline their 
ears unto them. 

i " Will not the solid wisdom of the Olam, have more 
weight in the scale of the understanding of the chil- 
dren of Ulladj than the superficial ignorance of the 
priests ?" 

Seadna was troubled, for he delighted in peace. 

Still might Eri have enjoyed repose, but Mutedac 
the son of Aoda the son of Nuad, some time Ardrt, 
would not have it so. He did run out far beyond the 
limits of the law. 

He took no pains to curb the unruly thoughts of a 
distempered mind, his anger was as sudden as the 
rising of the streams of the waters at the foot of the 
hill ; his malice was as the devouring flame. 

Nought that his brain, the sentinel of imagination, 
did convey to his heart the minister of thought, that 
his hand did not execute, if the tidings were of 
cruelty in toTture of body or of mind. 

This one had done deeds, the likeness unto which 
had not beeu heard in Er4j nay, so little were they 



OF ERI. 277 

thought upon as to be done, that they entered not 
into the pure spirit of Eocaid, to make mention of 
any such in the writings on the roll of the laws. 

Muredachnd gathered unto him a band of youths, 
whose minds he did defile, and shape so aptly to his 
purposes, that the acts of their hands were fitted to 
the machinations of his heart. 

To them were gathered more and more, some from 
fear of Muredac, some from evil mind. 

And on a time Murcdac came to the tents of 
Siorna his brother, to win him to his company ; and 
Raolt one of the sons of Fail chief of Aoi Drona was 
with Siorna. 

And Siorna did commune with his brother, and 
seek to bring him back into the way he ought to 
move. 

And as Siorna did reprove him, Muredac said, 
" The tongue of censure should be silent save in the 
hearing of him that is rebuked ; if Siorna would 
come on such a day to the tents of his brother, and 
speak the words of his thoughts secretly ;" but 
nought said he to Raolt. 

And Siorna did go. And when one moon, had 
passed, words were spread* that Siorna was no 
where to be found; aud the rumour reached to 
Raolt 's ear. 

And he bethought himself of the words of Siorna, 
saying unto him* " Siornjt,. will go to the tents of 
Muredac, and strive to lead him from his evil 
course." And he brought to his mind the ungoverned 
fury of the passions of Muredac. 

The covenant of friendship between Siorna and 
Raolt was ever present to the heart of Raolt. 



278 CHRONICLES 

And Raolt called together a company of young 
men, and he said unto them, "Siorna the brother of 
the king, the friend of Raolt, is no where to be found." 
He also told of Muredac. 

And moreover he added, 

" Raolt will forth to seek his friend alone rather 
than stay;" and the young men said, "Whither 
Raolt goeth we will go also." 

And go they did. 

And when they came nigh unto the dwelling ot 
Muredac, they espied a man, of whom they inquired 
concerning the words that had been spread of 
Siorna. 

And when the man saw in the company of Raolt, 
a near kinsman of the mother of his children, they 
did embrace each other ; and the man did speak in 
the ear of his friend. 

And the youth of Aoi Drona said, " Where abid- 
eth Siorna ?" 

And the man said, " Muredac went from hence it 
is now four days, to the waters of the land to fish, 
towards the sun's going. Hear my few words, I must 
not tarry long. 

"Behold the dwelling of Muredac; thitherward 
proceed by the path CHI which we stand, till thou 
shalt come unto the waters of a brook, but cross 
them not. 

" Then turn to the north, keeping on straight, and 
thou wilt touch upon a little stream, pass over that; 
then of two paths go by the right, and quit it not 
until thou comest to a narrow track thaf runneth oa 
your left; 

"And when thou shalt have moved three hundred 



OF ER1 279 

paces, nay not so many, thou wilt see a thicket, 
there the path doth seem to have an end, but it is 
not so, creep through the brambles that o'ergrow that 
path, and there thou wilt find the cave where Siorna 
lies. 

" Farewell ; let me no longer bide with thee, my 
life would pay." 

And the young man did tell the words of his friend 
to Raolt, and he did lead the way, and the rest did 
follow him into the cave; and Raolt entered in, and 
there was found the form of Siorna in the arms of 
death. 

And it was brought forth. 

And the young men did cut down poles, and they 
did bear the weight qf Siorna to the land of his 
dwelling, and a great multitude followed the bearers, 
uttering lamentations, for Siorna was beloved of the 
people. 

Now when Muredac heard what had happed, he 
returned to his place ; and he who had told where 
Siorna lay in death escaped to Raolt, fear had seized 
upon his mind. 

And Muredac swore by the sun, moon, and stars 
that he would take vengeance of Raoh; that he would 
begin at the fingers of his hands and feet, and cut 
from off him, one inch each day so Jong as that he 
breathed. 

And when Raolt heard of the words, he said, " J^et 
Muredac invoke spirits of evil with sun, moon, or 
stars he holdeth no converse." 

And Raolt went to Teacmor, and told unto Seatfna 
the sayings and doings of Mvreda#. 



280- CHRONICLES 

And the king said, " These are words for the ear 
of the judge." 

And Raolt did tell them unto Meirtar, and the 
words were written down ; and messengers were sent 
to the land of the dwelling of Muredac, and to the 
congregation, to call upon his name, saying, 

" Let Muredac prince of Gaelen be in his place 
in the high chamber of Teacmor on Tobrad, to an- 
swer for the death of Siorna his brother." 

And Muredac did say, " Meirtar shall answer to 
Muredac by a mouth of every vein of him." Words 
were abroad that the reason of Muredac had departed 
from him. 

Now the time came when the assembly were toge- 
ther on Tobrad, and the seat of Muredac was empty; 
and Meirtar chief judge said, "Let the heralds call 
upon the name of Muredac" But Muredac did not 
answer. 

And Enid chief of Oir said, " What if the words 
of Raolt be heard?" 

And Meirtar said, " It may not be ; the words of 
the law say otherwise." 

And Enid said, " Shall it be told in Eri that when 
such a deed hath been done, we stood as the letters 
of the words on the roll of the laws ?" 

When Ardri rose, and said, 

" May it for ever be told in Eri that the kings, 
princes, and nobles, yea, and all the children of the 
land, stood and moved according to the letters of the 
words on the roll of the laws thereof." 

And Fail chief of Ib Dronag said, 

" Is then the blood of Siorna not to be inquired 
after?" 



OF ERI. 

And Ardri said, "Nay not so ; let the judge read 
the words of the law." 

And it was so. 

And Ardri said, " Let Meirtar do accordingly ; let 
Muredac be brought to answer." 

And after a while when the assembly were toge- 
ther in the high chamber, 

The chief judge rose, and said, " The power of 
the judge of Eri availeth not to bring in Muredac." 

And Ardri rose, and said, 

" What if hands be laid on Muredac ?" 

And it was so. 

And hands were laid on Muredac, and he was 
haled to Tobrad as a horse untameable. 

And when he was brought into the high chamber, 
he took his seat amongst the princes of Gaelen. 

And Fail chief of Ib Dronag said, " Js it fitting 
that one stained with his brother's blood, should sit 
amongst the princes of his race?" 

And Ardri rose, and said, , 

" Let none be defiled till the words spoken of him 
be made good, words may be false; let those spoken 
of Muredac be reputed as air till the truth be made 
manifest." 

And the chief judge said, 

" Let Muredac say who will answer for him." 

But Muredac said not a word, he cast his eye? 
here and there, now scornfully, now threateningly. 

And Meirtar repeated the words, but Muredac 
answered not. 

When Ardri rose, and said, 

" Let the chief judge look to it, that Muredac prince 
of Gaelen be in his place, even here, when the time 
fihall come to answer." 



282 CHRONICLES 

And now the nine days were counted, and the as- 
sembly were together, and Muredac was in his place; 
and the name of Raolt was called. 

And Raolt did enter, and he did stand up in the 
hearing of Muredac, and of the assembly; and he 
held up his right hand, and he swore by the sun, 
moon, and stars, and he invoked the spirit of Siorna, 
and he said, 

"On a day Raolt sat with Siorna in the tent of 
Siorna, and Muredac came thither; and Siorna chode 
with his brother, for that his ways were evil, as he 
said. 

" And Muredac was wroth, and he said, 'Twere 
better if Siorna would come to my dwelling, arid 
speak unto me secretly ; for he was angered that he 
spake in the hearing of Raolt. 

" And Siorna said, I will go to thee, my brother. 

" And after a while words came to the land of Ib 
Dronag, Siorna is no where to be found ; and Raolt 
remembered the words of Siorna, and he thought 
upon the wrath of Muredac, and he assembled a 
company, and we went nigh unto the tents of 
Muredac. 

" And a youth of Ib Dronag spoke with a man of 
that land, and he did tell him where Siorna was to 
be found. 

" And the young man, Camoid is his name, did 
conduct us by the paths that he was told, till Raolt 
did stand at a cave's mouth, and he did enter, and 
in that cave did Raolt find him that had been Siorna, 
Raolt's friend. 

" And we did bear the weight of Siorna to the 
land of his abode in life, and raised his heap. 



ERI. 263 



"What more remains let the friend of 
tell." 

And the judge said, " What sayeth Muredac to 
the words of Raolt ? n 

But Muredac answered not. 

And the name of Braid was called. 

And Braid came into the assembly: and he called 
Baal to bear witness to the words of his lips; and he 
said, "Braid is of the children of Cluandeas, my 
mind was wrought upon by followers of Muredac the 
prince to come into his train, and many are the 
things that I have done therein to rny great shame." 

And Seadna said, 

" Let Meirtar say unto this poor man, Tell not of 
thyself, it is of Muredac that thou art called upon 
to speak." 

And Braid said, 

" Upon a day Muredac was in his tent, and with 
him Siorna now no more; and Muredac when he 
did speak loud and terrible unto his brother, three 
men and myself did come into the tent, and Mure- 
dac did bid us to bind Siorna, and bear him to a 
cave well known to us, and there to leave hjin ; and 
so we did as Muredac had said. 

" And I did inquire of Muredqc, who shall tajce 
food unto the cave ; and he did answer, Have no 
heed of that. 

" And 1 did watch at times, but none did I see^ 
going the way. And when three days were passed, 
with trembling steps 1 stole unto the cave with a 
little food, such as it was, and called upon the name 
of Sinr/ia, but no voice did I hear except mine own. 

" An in I went, and there I felt the limbs of 



284 CHRONICLES 

Siorna gathered up, all stiff in coldness and in 
death. 

" And 1 did hasten from the place, and fear did 
whisper to my mind, speak not of this; but when a 
band led by young Raolt did thither go in search of 
Siorna, I did tell a youth, a follower of him, of what 
had happed, arid did direct his steps to that same 
cave where Siorna lay in death. My transgression 
hath been great, yea, more than I can bear. ' 

And Meirtar said, " What answereth Muredac to 
the words of Braid ?" 

And Muredac still sitting, said, 

" What hath Raolt the friend of Siorna the foe of 
Muredac spoken, but words of Camoid? I did not 
hear that Camoid, nay nor Braid have said I did 
slay Siorna. Siorna did rebuke me, and I was an- 
gered. And what though I thought to make him 
for the times to come desist, by laying some slight 
weight of suffering on him, and did say, Let him be 
bound and borne to the cave, I had no thought the 
men would leave him there. And Siorna died for 
that the men did do more than they were bidden to. 
That is the answer of Muredac the prince." 

AnJ the chief judge said aloud, 

" Ye have heard the words of Raolt and of Braid, 
and ye have heard what Muredac hath said. 

" Shall the words on the roll of the laws be 
read r" 

And all kepi their seats. 

And Muredac started up as to go forth. 

When Ardri said, " Nay : Muredac must not 
hence. 

" What though the hearers have not said that 



OF ERi. 285 

Muredac did slay Siorna, another question yet re- 
mains to ask of them, that Siorna had been hound, 
and home to a cave, and there was left, yea, till 
found dead. These things have we heard. 

" What if the judge would inquire of the assembly 
touching this matter." 

And Meirtar said, " Ye have heard the words of 
Raolt and of Braid. Shall the words on the roll of 
'the laws he read?" 

And all but Oilliol king of Gaelen held up their 
right hands. 

And the words on the roll were read. 

And Seadna said, " Let the words be fulfilled." 

And Muredac was led forth, and he was shut up 
in a chamber of Teacmor. 

Now the ears of the king were sieged by the kin- 
dred of Muredac ', saying, "If it pleaseth Ardril\\at 
no foul stain be laid on Muredac the prince." 

And Seadna, the tear of pity standing in his eye, 
said, " I marvel ye forget the cruel end of Storna, 
that your sorrow for him is lost in your compassion 
for Muredac. Neither my throne nor my life is so 
precious in my estimation as the words of the law. 

" Could I have survived the misfortune of a son 
of mine having done as Muredac, I would have 
guarded his escape from punishment for such a trans- 
gression : the hearers have said, the judge hath spo- 
ken, never shall the tongue of Seadna gainsay in 
such a case." 

. And a cave was dug in the breast of Tobrad to 
the sun's going, and thither was Muredac conveyed ; 
nor was any allowance of provision made for him, he 



CHRONICLES 

made none for Siorna; nevertheless, there was nu 
let to whatever was drought for him. 

And when the time of one moon and eleven days 
had passed, and Murednc was to go forth, a vast mul 
titude did gather about the rave, for it was mid-day, 
and a band of the companions of Muredac came 
thither. 

And when- lie came forth; lie rushed through the 
people as the wolf brrakcth through the ring of 
the hunters; and those with whom he had con- 
sorted moved towards him, and he vaulted on his 
horse, and rode of)' towards the land of his dwell- 
ing. 

And whilst the assembly were yet together, Seadna 
said, 

"Words of the laws arc wanting to reach him 
that hath caused the death of another with evil mind. 
Muredac still liveth therefore. 

" What if he that cause! h the death of another 
with evil mind be put to death in the like manner?" 

And the words were added. (a) 

Now Muredac flung out ; long while had not 
passed ere he came upon Rnolt unawares, and was 
nigh unto spoiling him of life, the arrow cut its pas- 
sage through the left ear of Raolt. 

And Itaolt did complain to Oilliol his brother; 
but Oilliol did more than wink, he did shut his eyes, 
yea, he did encourage Muredac by pliancy, through 
fear, as it was said. 

And when Seadna came into Ullad he had the 
assembly called to the mount; and words were put 
on the roll of the laws of Ullad, letter for letter aS 



OF ERI. 287 

tfn the roll of En, touching him that causeth the 
death of another. 

And Seadna rose, and said, 

" When the youths and the warriors shall be 
called from the tires of their kindred, to protect the 
aged, the damsels, and children of Ullad, methinks 
it is just that those who go forth to the battle had 
their reward. The men of Ullad touch not a spoil. 

" What if those who remain on the land of their 
duelling give some portion of the fruit of their la- 
bour to the men of war in clothing and in food ?" 

And it was so to he of Tainistact. 

Now the cry of war was raised through Eri ; 
Gaclen strengthened himself with the force of Mu- 
matn; but the arm of Duac, who had taken Iberiat 
the daughter of Fionn, the sister of Seadna, was not 
with Duac the king, nor was the power of Ib Drona, 
nor the weight of Cumar with Oilliol. 

And Seadna sent a messenger to the chief of Ol- 
danmact to come unto him to Dun Sobairce, and 
Tliorl came unto the king; and the covenant of life 
and death passed between Seadna and Tliorl: and 
Seadna did present unto Tliorl two horses, Gaot 
and Sciot, and four dogs gave he also unto him ; and 
Seabac\* the mother of Lualmar, and Tliorl returned 
to his place. 

And Seadna called Cier, and of the princes and 
nobles of Ullad unto him, and he said unto them, 
" Speak to the warriors to make ready the bow, and 
to whet the sword ; the king heareth the howling 
of the storm of battle." And Seadna moved to Teac- 
tnor. 

Now Oilliol was in'Afumain, and Duac had called 



288 CHRONICLES 

together the princes and nobles of that land to 
Hoc. 

And Duac the prince sent a messenger unto Ar- 
dri at Teacmor, saying, 

" The wolf is ravenous, he roameth through the 
land, he sharpeneth his tooth for slaughter, his sto- 
mach spues forth its froth, making a place for the 
blood of the prey. Let the shepherd look to his 
flock." 

And Ardri sent the letters of Duac unto Cier his 
son, to read the words unto the ear of the princes 
and nobles of Ullad. And Seadna added moreover, 
" Let Beirid write down the words on the book of 
the chronicles." 

, Now Muredac had assembled a great force, and 
they moved towards the Seanaman ; and the host of 
Mumain, with Lore prince of Ib Lugad, did join 
themselves to them, and they passed over the water 
of At It Crcas t and began to waste the lands of Oldan- 
mact. 

And Thorl was at Coraigmar, when words were 
brought unto him, saying, 

" The flarne of war is devouring the dwellings of 
Oldanmact." 

And Thorl sent messengers whither they may go 
because of the men of Mumain and of Gaelen, say- 
ing* 

" Will not the Danan quench the fire ? Thorl 

hasteth to give rest to the hand that hath kindled 
it." 

Whilst these things were a doing, Cier and the 
warriors of Ullad were speeding towards Oldanmact. 

And Thorl was in the midst of the host of Oldan- 



OF ERI. t 289 

, nor would he stay his hand till his messengers 
returned from Ullad. 

And the Danan fought valiantly, and Lore prince 
of Ib Lugad was slain ; but the men of Oidanmact 
fell back, they were too few, and Muredac gave a 
loose to his hand for mischief. 

And he had gathered together a huge prey, and as 
the men were driving the cattle towards the river, the 
beasts brake awa}% and ran towards their pastures 
with a loud crying. 

And as the men of Mumain and of Gaelen were 
chasing after the cattle to drive them back, lo! the 
warriors of Ullad came in sight. 

The day was now far spent, and Cier and Thorl 
made preparation for the morrow. 

And on the morrow the warriors of Eri met on 
Mag Reide, the host of Mumain led by Aongus, a 
prince of Mumain; and the men of Gaelen followed 
Muredac, and Cier 'the son of Seadna moved before 
the warriors of Ullad; none of the kings of Eri were 
in the battle. 

And many of the men of Mumain fell on the 
earth, and many fell into the waters of Sea nam an, and 
the host was scattered, and escaped as they could, to 
the tents of their dwelling. 

And Cier abided with Thorl yet a few days, and 
the warriors of Ullad moved towards Teacmor, where 
Ardri was. 

And Cier told unto his father all that had happed. 
And as the host of Ullad stood in the circle on 7V 
brad, Ardri in the midst, the nobles moved. fro nf*their 
places towards him, and Don chief of Mis said, 

" The ting abideth amongst those whose uiiuds 

IJ, V 



500 CH&'OKICLES 

are evil to 4nm wards. If he would suffer of the 
warriors of Ullad to dwell nigh unto Tobrad." 

And Seadna answered, and said, 

" Nobles of Ullad, thanks for your love ; yet to 
the words of Don must 1 say, Nay. VYheii the name 
of the king cannot sustain the power, 'twere well he 
Ceased to rule." 

Now Ardri did send messengers unto Oilliol 
king in Gaelen, and unto Duac king in Mumain, 
saying, 

" Let Oilliol and Duac answer in the high cham- 
ber of Teactnor on Tobrad, why have the hosts of 
their lands passed the waters of Seanaman, and as- 
saulted the Danan.^ 

And Oilliol answered unto Ardri, " Let Muredac 
answer." 

And unto the words of the king did Duac an- 
swer, 

" Hath the Danan time to utter complaint, he 
shall have leisure also to lick his wounds." 

And Oilliol came unto Teacmor suppliantly, yet 
insidiously, his words were sharp agai st Mvredac; 
and he said, " When 1 have reproved Muredac, his 
fury hath burst upon me like a torrent, he foamed 
and roared, * Standeth Oilliol with my enemy against 
me? Will Oilliol tamely bear that his brother, of the 
race of many kings, shall be called Cimon Ureac, 
not Muredac, by this peacemonger, this wisdom- 
mouther of a king?' 

" Oilliol speaketh the very words, to shew the king 
that Muredac is mad." 

And Seadna communed gently with Oiltiol, and 
he said unto him, "Are we not brethren? Do not 



ofr fife i. 

the currents of our blodd flow from the same foun- 
tain ? Was not Golam the father of Marcac, of CY#\ 
land of Mar; from Ci>r I, thou from lolar. 

"Was it well done of Oilliol and of Duct c Lore 
is no more, therefore shall the tongue of Scadna be 
silent of his name to make a covenant not against 
Seadna, but against the laws of Eri? 

" I call the spirit of my father to witness, I never 
called thy brother by any name but that of Muredac. 
If his hot and fiery temper hath branded him with the 
foul names of which thou speakest, am I to bear the 
censure of his fault? 

" Full well doth Oilliol know, such was the mind 
of the princes and nobles towards Muredac when he 
was brought to answer for the death of Siorna, the 
brother of him and of Oilliol; they would have 
Vaulted o'er the laws to cast Muredac out of sight, 
had I not fenced him within the pale of the very 
letters on the roll ; else had Muredac the soil of 
Aoda the brother of Oilliol have ceased, and ceased 
even so. 

" I w r ould thy hand did move in obedience to a 
true heart, to take the hand of Seadna in love and 
friendship." 

And Oilliol reached his hand to Seadna, and 
Seadna pressed the hand of Oilliol to his breast. 

And Oiiliol said, " If the king would overlook 
the transgression of MuredaC ?" 

And Seadna said, " The assembly of Eri must 
answer unto these words of Oiltiol? And Oilliol re- 
turned to his place. 

And Seadna moved towards Dun Sobairce. 

Now Muredac did not leave off to vex the land; 

u2 



292 CHRONICLES 

and Oilliol and Duac, though aged, did conspire 
wit him against Ardri. 

The secret thoughts of Oilliol were made known 
unto Seadna by means of Raolt ; for Feat, the father 
of Raolt, chief of Ib Dronag, and the chief of Cumar 
in Gaelen did adhere to Seadna. 

And the contrivings of Duac were told to the king 
by Duac, the father of the children of Iberiat the 
sister of Ardri. 

Of the mind of Muredac no man taketh note ; 
uncertain as the wind, he knoweth not the mind of 
himself. 

And now when Seadna was in Ullad, he h d the 
assembly called to the mount: 

And he spake of the dark cloud that hung heavily 
over Eri, and he spake of the friendship of Otdanmact: 
and Seadna said, " Let the princes and nobles have 
the warriors ready to the battle." 

And he added moreover, 

" Let all be in Dun Sobairce, the boards will be 
spread, and for the congregation of the children of 
the land." 

And the feasts were prepared, and joy and mirth 
filled the minds of all. 

And whilst the congregation was together, the king 
said, 

" Let the words on the roll of the laws be read 
aloud in the hearing of the people." 

And it \vas so. 

And the book of the chronicles was opened, and 
the words were read. 

And when an end was made, the king rose, and 
said, 



OF ERI. 293 

1 " There are yet more words for the ears of C7- 
lad." 

And he put into the hands of me Berid the writings 
of Eocaid Olam Fndla; and I did read the words 
aloud, to the amazement of all the assembly, for they 
had not heard them aforetime. 

And Seadna stood up, and said, 

" Strange it is, but the thoughts hath sprung upon 
the mind of Seadna, that he standeth on Dun So- 
bairce for the last time." 

And on the day before the king did take his de- 
parture from Dun Sobairce, and the king did sit with 
Cief his son, and I Berid was in the chamber of the 
king, Cier said unto his father, 

" My mind is full of fancies, growth of rumours 
scattered abroad ; if it seemeth good in thy sight, let 
Cier attend the steps of his father, as he journeyeth 
towards Teacmor" 

And the king said, " Let not my son allow his mind 
to give entertainment to fancies which reason would 
reject; nevertheless, what though my judgment check- 
eth thy fancy, the tongue of love speaketh my thanks 
for thy affection." 

And Cier said, 

" The fancies which idle tongues did invite to the 
mind of Cier his reason entertained, because of the 
words of his father spoken in the hearing of the chil- 
dren of the land." 

And Seadna said, 

" How cautious ought man to be not to utter more 
than truth avoucheth." 

And he added moreover, " Let our fancies wing 
their way into the general air, whilst Seadna mo- 



294 

veth towards Teacmor, and Cier abideth at Dun 
Sobairce" 

And Seadna took his departure what time Baal 
was two days in the second chamber of his house 
Cruining. 

And on the fifth day he passed over the waters of 
Eider. 

And as he journeyed through the forest of Lurg, 
a multitude surrounded his way, and they stopped 
up the passage of the king, and they rushed in upoq 
him, and they slew all in his company, save Doeg, 
chief of Ard Deas. 

And they bare off Seadna and Doeg unto the 
depths of the forest, wherein was a cave, and they 
did shut them up therein ; and ere long time passed, 
they dragged them forth into the presence of Mure- 
dac. 

And Muredac bad to bind cords round the left 
arm, and the left leg of the king ; and one end of the 
rope made they fast to a tree, and the other end 
thereof tied they to another tree standing opposite 
thereto. 

And others did fasten another rope to the tree 
opposite to that whereat Seadna was bound ; and 
some did fell the tree, and as the tree dropped, 
the limbs of Seadna were torn from his body man- 
gledly. 

And Muredac did compel the eyes of Doeg to be 
witnesses to the horrid deed. 

And when an end was thus put to Seadna^ Mure- 
dac said aloud, " Let not the cords be touched, 
that the marks of captivity may still be on him." 
And unto Doeg he said, 



OF ERI. 295 

" Go, Doeg, and tell, in the hearing of Ullad and 
Of Eii, thus hath Muredac wiped out the stain that 
Seadua laid upon him." 

Thus fell Seadtui, the wise, the just, the valiant, 
having ruled over Ullad and over Eri for the course 
of fifteen rings. 

() On this occasion was this law added to the laws of Eri. 



CHAP. XI. 

The reign of Muredac, a space of one ring 5 , from 
471 to 470. 

MUREDAC hasted to Teacmor, and entered 
therein with violence. 

Now the messengers had gone through Eri, whilst 
Seadna had lived, to call the assembly to the high 
chamber ; and when the time was, some few of the 
princes and nobles of Mumain-vaiA Gaelen, with the 
kings thereof, vyere on Tobrad: 

But neither the princes, nobles, Olam, heads of the 
people, nor judges from Ullad, nor the chief, nor no- 
bles of Oldanmact caine thereto. 

And those who were present entered into the high 
chamber, and abided awhile in silence; at length 
one of the heralds of Gaelen said aloud, 

" The throne is empty." 

And all held their peace, looking each on the 
others with amazement. 

When Muredac rose, and said, 



296 CHRONICLES 

" If all of the race decline the throne of JEW, 
Muredac the son of Aoda, from Erimionn, will sit 
thereon." But no tongue moved. 

And he went forth to Liajail, and Ard Cruimtear 
did seat Muredac thereon, and he did place the asioti 
on the head, and the mantle did he lay on the 
shoulders of Muredac. 

And Muredac returned to the high chamber, and 
seated himself on the throne. 

And when the assembly were on the mount of 
Ullad, Doeg chief of Ard Deas rose, and said, 

" What if Cier the son of Seadna be chosen king 
in Ulladr 

And all said, " Yea." 

And Cier was seated on the seat of the king. And 
when he was attired in the asion and mantle, he 
opened his mouth, and said, " Doeg chief of Ard 
Deas hath words for the ears of Ullad so full of 
horror, that no time is even for sorrow till vengeance 
be taken." 

And Doeg stood up, and he did tell all that passed 
in Lurg. 

And when he had made an end, the sound of the 
voices of the thousands of Ullad was heard, crying, 
" To battle ! To battle !" 

And Cier rose, and said, 

" Men of Ullad, get ready the arms of the war- 
rior. Would not peace be a crime? Is it not the 
duty of the children of the land to make the tor- 
turer of our mangled father pay the Eric of his de- 
tested life? 

" It is said, this Cimon Breac hath seated himself 
in Teacmor: shall the destroyer of his brother, the 



OF ERI. 297 

secret spoiler of the life ofSectdna, be suffered to stain 
the throne of Eri? 

" Let us pluck him thence. 

" Nobles, to your Tanaisteas, assemble the war- 
riors out of hand. We will not feast, nor sport, nor 
hear the harp's sweet voice, till we have swept the 
wolf Muredac from off the surface of the earth. 

" To your tents, men of Ullad; bid farewell to 
your women and your little ones." 

And the princes gathered round Cier at Dun So- 
bairce. 

And the chiefs went each to the tent of his dwell- 



ing. 



And Caban was chosen Ard Olam of Ullad in 
the place of Send, he was slain in the forest of 
Lurg. 

Now whilst the warriors of Ullad were making 
preparation to move to Teacmor, to seize Muredac, 
words came from Thorl unto Cier, saying, 

*' Cimon Breac hath sent for tribute, and Thorl 
hath sent in the place thereof these words : 

" To Eris king Thorl will pay his tribute, not 
to the secret spoiler of the life of the Ardri. 

" Cimon Breac hath flung his senses from him, 
and hath sworn to throw the Danan to fishes of the 
sea. 

" Therefore, what if Cier did lead the host of 
Ullad toward Aron, whence they can pour into Ol- 
danmact, and so shut up the way against the escape 
of Muredac" 

And Cier sent words by the messenger of Thorl, 
So be it." 

And Cier sent a sure messenger unto Dune prince 



298 CHRONICLES 

ofMumain, and unto Raolt the son of Fail chief of 
Ib Dronag, and to Alister chief of Cumar, saying, 

" When Cimon Breac shall call out the host, come 
ye with them, till then be silent." 

And Muredac sent messengers through Gaelen, and 
through Alumarn, yea, and to Ullad, saying, 

" Let the warriors of Eri gather themselves round 
Ardri on Cesiolout of hand, Oldanmact hath refused 
his tribute." 

And the priests of Ullad sought to turn away the 
minds of the Gaal from Cier, saying, 

" The Danan (the friends of the race of Er) know 
not Baal they hold converse with spirits of the 
deep. 

'-'The princes of Er abide amongst the Olam, 
damping the fire of the warrior. 

" Why hath not Cier taken vengeance, now twelve 
moons passed, for the blood of his father? Hath he 
been asking counsel of the men of wisdom, till now 
that he bethinketh himself to lead forth the warriors 
not to avenge the spirit of Seadna, but to stop the 
tribute of the king?" 

But the Gaal regarded not the words of the 
priests. The host of Ullad moved towards Oldan- 
mad assuredly. 

And they joined themselves to the warriors of Ol- 
danmact, on the plain of Ruine, and they raised up 
their tents thereon. 

And Muredac, and the men of Mumain and of 
Gaelen raised up their tents on the eastern extremity 
of the plain. 

And in the middle of the night Duac and Raolt 



OF ERJ. 

came unto the tent of Cier, but no man was in their 
company, and Cier rose, and he did sit with them, 

Baal had been four nights in his house Siocan; 
he was late ere he came forth to the sight of the chil- 
dren of Eri, and the plain was as one tire, the night 
did feel cold piercingly. 

And Cier bad the watchmen alarm the warriors, 
that they should be prepared to move at the instant 
J3aal should shew himself. 

But ere his messengers had given signal of his ap- 
proach, the host stood about t}ie chiefs,, thejr eyes 
towards the sun's rising. 

And as Baal darted the first ray from the light of 
his countenance upon the plain of Ruine, the wajrri- 
ors of Ullad drew forth their swords. 

And Cier raised his hand on high, and he swqre 
that the rising sun should not withdraw himself from 
the world of land, till Muredac or Cier was no more, 
or worse. 

And all the princes, and all the chiefs, and all the 
ho.^ swore to take vengeance on Muredac for Seqfa 
nas blood. 

And they sent forth a shout that shook the clouds, 
and moved towards Muredac. 

And Duac and Raolt fought, one on the right, the 
other on the left side of Cier, on their feet. 

And Thorl fought like a wolf; and the Gaal of 
Ullad roared as the winds in the narrow vales, ven- 
geance for the blood of Seadnq; they luowpd down 
all that stood rqupd Muredac. 

Now Duac bad the heralds say aloud, 

"Will the Gaal of Eri stain themselves with (he 



300 CHRONICLES 

blood that Muredac hath shed ? Will the men of Eri 
uphold the guilt ofCimon J^reacT 

When Muredac heard the words he became fran- 
tic, and the men began to fall off from him. 

And when Cier came in sight of Muredac, Mure- 
dac turned away his eyes from him. 

And Cier did spring forward towards him, when 
,Raolt stopped his foot, saying, 

" To fall in battle by the sword of Cier would be 
a death too glorious for Cimon Breac, the slayer of 
Seadna and of Siorna, let him be laid hold on." 

And Cier, and Duac, and Raolt, and princes and 
chiefs, and 6r/did overthrow all that stood in their 
terrible course, and hands, even the hands of Raolt 
the friend of Siorna were laid on Muredac ,- and he 
was borne to the tents of Thorl. 

And the men of Mumain, and the men of Gaelen 
passed over the waters of Seanamau in haste. 

The host of Ullad tarried not in Oldanmact. 

And Muredac was thrown into a chest, and borne 
on a car to the forest of Lurg. 

And as Cier was returning to Dun Sobairce, Raolt 
inquired of him what was to be done with Muredac? 

And Cier answered, " He shall be guarded within 
Dun Sobairce, till the assembly of Teacmor are to- 
gether, that the words on the roll of the laws be 
read." 

-And Duac, Doeg, and Raolt did commune on the 
words of Cier, and as it was fixed amongst them, 
Dttacdid say, " If Cier would move with the host to 
Dun Sobairce T 

And it was so. 



OF ERI. 

And Duac, Doeg, and Raolt, did loiter, and every 
chief on the way was told of the words spoken by 
these three, one to the other; and so all the chiefs 
and all the warriors from Oldanmact to Lurg were 
together. 

And when they carne to the forest of Lurg, Cimon 
Jlreac was brought forth of the chest, and he was 
tiling into the cave into which he did fling Seadna. 

And he was takem from thence into the presence 
of the men of Ullad; and they made a circle in an 
open space, and Muredac was placed in the midst. 

And Duac said aloud unto Doeg chief of Ard 
Deas, " Let Doeg look on this one ; hath he ever 
seen him afore, and what have his eyes been wit- 
nesses to his having done?" 

And Doeg did tell in the hearing of the host all 
the doings and sayings of Muredac, when he had 
Seadna the king torn asunder. 

And all cried, "The law upon his carcase." 

And they would have bound Muredac to the tree 
whereto he had Seadna bound, but no tree was 
standing thereabout ; the Gaol had torn it, and all 
those nigh unto, out of the earth, because of Seadna. 

And Muredac was bound, and torn to pieces, as 
Seadna the king had been according to the bidding 
of Muredac. 

And the chiefs led the warriors to the lands of 
their dwellings; and Duac and Raolt did go to Dun 
Sobairce. 

And when they did tell unto Cier what had been 
done he was grieved thereat, he said, " When the 
limbs of Muredac were torn from his body, a rent 
was also made in the roll of the laws of JEW." 



CHRONICLES 



Arid Muredac is called Cimon Breac for the marks 
of captivity upon him whilst he abided within the 
cave in Tobrad, and for the many crimes with which 
he was bespotted. 



CHAP. XII. 

reign rt/'Duac, a space of nine rings t from 470 
to 401. 

Now the assembly of Eri were together on Tobr&d, 
and Duac the son of Breasrig of I her, was chosen. 

And when he had ruled one ring, Duac king in 
Mumain died, and Daire his son was chosen. 

Duac dwelled in Teacmor, and he did go oft- 
times to Dun Sbbairccj and Cier did love Duac as 
his own father. 

And when Duac had sat seven rings, Oilliol king in 
Gaelen ceased, and Muredac the son of Muredac 
Cimon Breac, was chosen. 

And when Daire and Muredac did come together 
on Tobrad at the meeting of the assembly, it escaped 
not the eyes of any that their minds were full of 
jeaiousy the one, of a desire for revenge the other, 
against Ardri. 

What though Duac felt that his words were as 
air> yea> as an evil wind in the ears of these twain, 
he reposed on the love of Cier for him, and on the 
friendship of Thwi for Cier. 

His security was his ruin. 

Muredac ceased not to trouble Fail the father of 
Raolt, and Rcvdt himself, for the love he bare to Si- 



OF ERI. S03 

And he did cause Daire to complain 6f 
Haolt in the high chamber, for horses and dogs, and 
two curious mantles, and a shield of exquisite work, 
'Wrought under the eye of Feariris, (a) in the iiionn- 
1?ams of M&main, which Daire did say had been, 
taken by Raolt from the tents of Duac his father. 

When the words of Daire were heard, amazement 
prized on the assembly. 

And Ardri rose, and said, " I did give unto Rnolt 
the son of Fail, chief of Ib Dronag, horses and dogs 
and mantles; and a shield which 1 had wrought for 
JRaolt, with his banner thereon ;(&) the ones I gave 
unto him were mine own, never had Duac king of 
Mumain those that I did give unto Raolt. 

And Muredac and Daire were put to shame, for 
that all present did know the thing was contrived be- 
tween them. 

And these two ceased not from troubling Duac. 

And when Duac had ruled for the course of nine 
rings, Muredac king of Gaelen did call together the 
princes and nobles to the mount of Gaelen. 

And he had to those that would adhere unto him 
words spoken, " Let of the clans in some force fol- 
low after me, and let not the arms of the chiefs be far 
from them." 

And when the talk concerning a controversy be- 
tween the chiefs of Maglein and Eadendair was held, 

And Muredac had said, " Let the chiefs of Cwnar 
and of Ib Dronag return to their tents," Muredac 
did move with those about him armed towards 
Teticmwr. 

And what though the men whom Ardri could as- 
semble were but few, he would not abide in Teac- 



304 CHRONICLES 

mor ; he did go out before his thin host, and when 
he saw the men of Gaelcn hasting towards him, he 
did quicken his pace to meet them. 

And as he was passing through the stream of the 
brook that runneth through Magnailbe, he fell into 
the arms of death, pierced to the heart with an ar- 
row. 

And those that had followed Duac were over- 
powered, and escaped as they could. 

And Muredac went forward, and entered into 
Teacmor. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER XII. 

() It is worthy of remark that Vulcan is also called by the Phoe- 
nician name of Ciniris, which in the language of Eri means the 
" chief of brass," as Feariris signifies a " mnn of brass." 

(b) From var ous passages in these chronicles it appears that the 
shields of the chiefs had devices. 



CHAP. XIII. 

The reign of Muredac the son of Muredac Ciruon 
JBreac, a space of five rings, from 4(>l to 456*. 

Now messengers were sent forth by Muredac, 
saying, 

" Let the assembly of Eri come together out of 
hand to choose Ardri, Duac is no more." 

And those of Gaelen were on Tobrad, and they 
chose Muredac king in Gaelen to sit Ardri. 

Cier abided in Ullad, the delight of the children of 
the land ; and Thorl came not forth of Oldanmact. 



OF ERI. 305 

No store of aught did Cier hoard, ring after ring 
goetli he through Ullad at the charge of the king. 

When Muredac had ruled four rings, Daire king 
in Mumain ceased, whilst he was mounting to the 
back of his horse. 

And Eunda the son of Duac the son of JBKm, some 
time Ardri, was chosen king in Mumain. 

And Muredac raised his voice towards Eunda and 
Mumain. And he entered that land with the war- 
riors. And Eunda called together the men of Mum- 
ain, such as could be collected in haste, and they 
speeded towards Muredac. 

They fought with fury ; and Muredac fell, having 
ruled for five rings. 



CHAP. XIV. 

The reign of Eunda king in Mumain, a space of 
five rings, from 456 to 451. 

CONGAL the brother of Muredac was chosen king 
in Gaelen; and Eunda king in Mumain was chosen 
Ardri. 

The spirit of Roiteactac abideth in Eunda ; he 
spendeth his time in the mountains of Iber, looking 
into the bowels of the earth. 

And he did bring silver and brass therefrom. And 
as he was passing through the depths of the moun- 
tains on a time, a stag of a size more than was com- 
mon, ran towards the way which he was moving. 
And Eunda took a bow from the hand of one nigh 

voi,. is. x 



306 CHRONICLES 

unto him, and he did send an arrow after the deer 
far from him ; and the arrow did strike the deer quite 
dead on the spot, and the deer was wonderful to 
look upon. 

And Eunda was excessively proud because of this 
thing, and he had pieces of silver stamped with the 
figure of the stag, and they were worn for ornaments 
by the damsels of Mumain. 

And when Eunda had ruled for the course of five 
rings, he died in the mountains of Iber, and his heap 
was raised nigh unto the heap of Roiteactac. 

He abided not at Teacmor save whilst the assem- 
bly were together on Tobrad. 

Note. The banner of the M'Cartliys, who are descended from 
Iber and Eunda, is a stag, probably from this circumstance. 



CHAP. XV. 

The reign 0/* Lugad, a space of Jive rings, from 451 

to 446. 

THE assembly of Mumain were together, and Lu- 
gad the brother of Eunda was called to the seat of 
the king in Mumain. 

And when the assembly of Eri were on Tobrad, 
Lugad was chosen Ardri. 

Lugad loveth peace and the ways thereof; and 
he doth spend his days and nights as did Eunda in 
the mountains of Iber. 

Uilad dwelleth in repose. And when Cier had 
ruled in truth and justice for the course of one score 



OF ERI. 307 

and fbur rings, he ceased, and Fionn his first-born 
was chosen king in Ullad. 

Ami in one moon from the time that Cier died, 
died also Caban, and Dolar was chosen Ard Olam 
of Ullad. 

And when Lugad had ruled Ardri for the space 
of five rings, he was in the mountains ; and the winds 
blew loud, and the snows did descend, the like unto 
which had not been seen afore time, by the eye of 
one that lived. 

And the passages were stopped up, and Lugad 
perished, and many perished with the king in the 
mountains of Iber. 



CHAP. XVI. 

The reign of Fionn the son of Cier, a space of sixteen 
rings, from 446 to 430. 

EOCAID the brother of Lugad was chosen king 
in Mumain, and Fionn the son of Cier king in Ullad 
was chosen Ardri. 

And Fionn placed Cas a prince of Er n the seat 
nigh unto the seat of the king in Ullad. 

The friendship of Thorl is fixed fbr the sons of 
JEri, and peace is every where through the land. 

Fionn comet h to Dun Sobairce ring after ring, 
what time jBaa/entereth his house larsgith, he taketh 
his departure from Teacmor. 

When he had now ruled six rings, words came 
unto the ear of Fionn, being on Tobrad, saying, 

x 2 



308 CHRONICLES 

The judges of UJladare moving perversely, accord- 
ing to the words told unto Cas. 

And Ardri did send by the messenger, " Let the 
assembly be on the mount of Ullad what time Meas 
shall be to a close." 

And it was so. 

And when the assembly were together, the king 
rose, and said, 

" Fionn hath no words for the ears of Ullad, Eri 
is in repose; hath one of the assembly aught to 
say?" 

And CWsaid, "When the writings shall be read." 

And the roll of the laws was spread out, and the 
words were read. 

Arid the writings of Eolus and the chronicles of 
Gaeleg were read. 

And the king said, 

" The day is far gone ; we will hence to Dun So- 
bairce; the feasts are prepared, and on the morrow 
the chronicles of Eri, and the writing of Eocaid Olam 
Fodla shall be read in the ears of the people." 

Aad on the morrow the writings were read on the 
mount. 

And when an end was made, the heralds said aloud, 

" Stand any on tire mount of Ullad for justice ?" 

When a voice was heard, saying, 

" Fuidir of the clan of Bincor (a) wkhtu Ardtain, 
hath words for the ear of the king/ 

And Fuidir was called before the assembly, and 
he said, 

Fuar of the judges of Ardtain hath given unto 
Gleictvro heifers, and two sheep of the cattle of Fui- 



OF EKI. 309 

,. - 

di'r, and Fuidir hath he not called before the hearers, 
and Fuar calleth the spoil an Eric. 

" And Fuidir did tell of the doings of Fuar unto 
Ceadal over him ; but Ceadal heeded him not, and did 
send him away, saying, 

" Doth Fuidir think he knoweth the words on the 
roll of the law as well as Fuar ? And Gleic keepeth 
the cattle of Fuidir" 

And Siolac judge of Dun Sobairce said, " What 
saith Fuar to the words of Fuidir ?" 

And Fuar shook, and his voice trembled, and his 
words rippled through his teeth, and all he did strive 
to say made a bad thing worse. 

And Ceadal was called ; and he thought to deny 
the words he had spoken, and he was put to shame 
in the face of the assembly. 

The thing was made manifest by Tuingar 

and by Lor. 

And the assembly held talk, but none raised his 
voice for Fuar nor for Ceadal. 

And Scartan of the judges named rose, and said, 

" Jf the king would suffer Scartan to speak ?" 

And the king said, 

" JLetScarlan say.*' 

And Scartan stood up, and said, 

"The land is defiled, this thing is as though one 
had spilled the blood of the stranger, as he lay in 
sleep under the covering of his booth. 

" What if the goods of Fuar and of Ceadal be num- 
bered, and the goods of Fuidir be counted; and as 
the number of Ceadal and of Fuar is to the number 
of Fuidir -, let them pay out of their abundance. 



310 



CHRONICLES 



" And their names be blotted out from the roll of 
the judges of Ullad" 

When Scartan had made an end, 

The king rose, and said, 

" Ceadal and Fuar are polluted ; Ullad is not de- 
filed ; Ullad hath not shut the eye, nor winked at their 
transgression. 

" Methinks the ear of Scartan will receive with 
pleasure the words of the king, saying, 

" 'Twere good that the hardness of justice were 
softened with the tear of pity; Ceadal and Fuar have 
strayed beside the law, hath not Scartan, done like,- 
wise even now? What words of the roll avouch the 
words of Scartan more than the doings of the other? 

" Let the words of Scartan be reproved, whilst the 
doings of Ceadal and Fuar shall get their reward. 

" What if Ceadal and Fuar no more sit on the 
seat of the judge, whilst their names stand on the 
roll, the cause of their having ceased noted a me- 
morial of the evil they have wrought, to the terror of 
those that are to come."(&) 

And the king added moreover, 

" What though these men have done wrong, he 
who hath spoken of them may also have been a trans- 
gressor ? Fuar erred in the manner, 'twere good the 
matter be inquired into in Ardlain, and right done 
according to the words on the roll of the laws, be- 
tween Gleic and Fuidir T 

And Scartan raised his voice aloud, and said, 

" The mercy of the king exceedeth " 

The last of his words had but proceeded from his 
mouth, when a voice was heard from the multitude 
assembled round the mount, saying, 



OF ERI. 311 

" Will not the king hear rny words? O king, incline 
thine ear to the tale of the unhappy EansaT 

And the words reached to the king, and he said, 

" Let the tale of woe be told and heard." 

And Eansa came into the midst, and in piteous 
Toice, she said, 

"There standeth here companion with the king 
and nobles of the land, one that hath changed joy to 
sorrow in the dwelling of JBosluat. 

" Bosluat hath three sons, and two daughters hath 
he, the children of Eansa. 

" Hath not the king heard talk of Massa and $uil- 
cana, the lovely damsels that dwell by the streams of 
Duba, beneath the hill of Ballan? 

" Massa went to Gealad in Magmor, in the pre- 
sence of her father and her mother, and her breth- 
ren, to meet young Rolad, arid with her heart to give 
unto the youth the hand of promise, that when in- 
gathering next should pass, the booth of Rolad 
should be the dwelling-place of Massa. 

" And when abroad the words were spread, that 
they had given hands, not one but many were the 
tongues that moved in malice and m envy to the ear 
of both, of one and of the other. 

" How Rolad gained the love of many a maid to 
their undoing, this to her ; how the desire of Massa 
sickened for Maranoge, this to him was told. 

" There dwelleth now a man on the borders of the 
land of Clanadon, and he had whispered in the ear 
of Massa words not fitting to be told ; the maid in 
scorn blushed. 

" Unto Bosluat he did speak of dangers round 
about us, \fRolad took the maid: Bosluat knoweth 
not what it is to fear, doing no wrong. 



312 CHRONICLES 

" This time plenty decked our board, abundance 
for ourselves, and over and above for the stranger on 
his way. 

" But soon our cattle did begin to disappear ; the 
youths our sons kept watch, and caught a thief, a 
dweller in a neighbour's tent, our neighbour is a 
judge, thither the youths did lead the servant boy. 

"And they did tell unto the judge of what had 
happed, and Bosluat did move him to inquire. 

" The judge was deaf. 

" A cow, a sheep, a kid came to our land ; this 
judge did send unto Bosluat to answer, and he did 
answer, They are strays. 

" He called not the hearers, saying, I have large 
powers e'en from the king, 1 hear and say. 

" Come we to this judge being wronged, he re- 
gardeth us not ; have any come to speak of us, he 
listeneth as though he had e'en five score ears, and 
spake as from a hundred tongues; and he saith all 
himself, no hearer but Bosluat, and some friend of 
ours, and he who haps to come to do us wrong. 

" To make a long tale short, this judge hath injured 
us in every way, therefore we now be poor, yea, very 
poor ; our substance is quite drained, and all be- 
cause our Massa would not listen to the voice of 
love from this lewd judge. 

"And this same judge doth stand here with the 
king, and Scartan is his name." 

Whereupon Siolac said, " Who avoucheth the 
words of Eansa ?" ; 

And Eansa said, " If Tul were called V 

And when Tul answered to the voice speaking his 
name, Scartan most piteously did say, "Scartan is 
sick to fainting, if it -pl^^th that Scartan go forth ?' 



OF ERI. 313 

And forth he went, and the assembly abided in 
wonder. 

And now time passed more than thought needful 
for the absence of Scartan ; and all were silent, as 
afeard to speak after the words of Scartan, the 
sound of whose voice was loud 'gainst Fuar and 
Ceadal. 

Awhile and Siolac said, " Is Scartan to be sought, 
or shall Tul speak?" 

And the king said, 

" Eocaid Olam Fodla, in whose spirit I breathe, 
did establish laws for Eri, and on the roll thereof 
are these words, 

" Deliver no judgment against man in his ab- 
sence. 

" Hath Siolac one of the judges, who ought to 
read the words of the law continually, not looked 
thereon, or have they slipped from his memory ? 

" Let every tongue be silent of Scartan, that 
Scartan h caret h not. 

" Let him be sought." 

And whiles the assembly stood on the mount, 
Fionn did deliver lessons of wisdom in the spirit of 
Eocaid: he uttered lamentations for the judges, and 
he said, 

" How perverse are the ways of man ; the faults 
of others he doth discern, though they be no greater 
than the thread of a spider's net ; his own he seeth 
not though they be as huge as the hills of the plains, 
and as obvious as the fire that blazeth on the sum- 
mits thereof in the darkness of the night. 

" How greatly do I fear the time will come when 
the words of the mouth of the judges of Eri will 



314 CHKOMCLES 

lie accepted for the words of the law by the children 
of the land." 

And whiles the king yet spoke, Scartan was led 
into the assembly ; and it was now late. 

Arid the king said, 

" Perad vent lire the mind of Scartan is not now 
prepared to answer. 

" What if he abide amongst his fellows till the 
morrow, then let him come hither; and let all stand 
on the mount who have knowledge of the matter for 
and against." 

And on the morrow, when the assembly were on 
the mount, 

Siolac rose, and said, 

" Let Scartan say, shall Tul speak ?" 

And Scartan whispered in the ear of one of his 
fellows, 

" Let the knowledge of Tul abide within him." 

And the king rose, and said, 

" The words of the roll of the laws reach not to 
the transgressions of the judges. 

" What if a judge go aside from the words of the 
law and a complaint thereof be made to the chief 
judge, and the wrong be proven, the Eric be nine 
fold." 

And all said, " Yea." 

" And should the chief judge turn away his ear 
from the voice of complaint, or transgress in any 

way, 

" What if his Eric be fifteen fold to him who hath 
been injured ; and the judge who shall do the wrong 
cease to sit on the seat of the judge ?" 



OF ERI. 315 



And it was so, and the words were added to 
words of the laws of Ullad. 

And the king raised his voice aloud, and said, 

" Whilst the spirit. of Eocaid O/am Fodla, the just 
lawgiver, shall abide in the hearts of the king, princes, 
and nobles of Ullad, and the minds of the people, 

" The left hand of the law shall be outstretched to 
raise up the oppressed, and his right hand will be 
uplifted to beat down the oppressor." 

And the king added moreover, 

" Eansa hath done well; let her move to Dun 
Sobairce" 

And the king did speak unto Eansa at Dun So- 
bairce, and he said unto her, 

" What hath been thy loss from the wrong doer?" 

And Eansa answered, and said, " What availeth 
our loss? Hath not the king exalted Eansa in the 
sight of the children of the land ?" 

And the king inquired if Hotad had taken Massa. 

And Eansa answered, " Yea: Massa dwelleth in 
the tent of Rolad, since the last arm-full of ingather- 
ing was fetched home." 

And Fionn gave command to the keeper of his 
cattle, saying, 

" Let ten heifers and six ewe-sheep, and two she 
goats be driven from the flocks of the king amongst 
the cattle of Bosluat." 

And Eansa returned to her place comforted. 

And Fionn gave a strict charge unto Cas to have 
his ears open to the complaints of the people. 

And he took his departure for Teacmor. 

And when he had ruled for nine rings, he went 
to Oldanmacl to see Thorl, who lay on his bed : and 



316 CHRONICLES 

he abode with Thorl, and did comfort him, but he 
spake not with the kindred of the chief, nor with 
the nobles of the Danan, least jealousy of him may 
come into their minds. He had not returned to 
Teacmor one moon when Thorl ceased, and Fionn 
mourned for him. 

And when Fionn had ruled for fifteen rings, Con- 
gal king of Gaelen died, and Eocaid his son was 
chosen king in Gaelen. 

And when the assembly of Eri took their depar- 
ture from Tobrad, Ardri \vent to Dun Sobairce, and 
he became feeble in his limbs suddenly. 

And he was told by Fillan his physician to go 
into the waters of the salt sea, and he did as Filluu 
said, and the pain became excessive, and he wasted 
and died, having ruled for the course of sixteen 
rings. 

And Fionn is called Siorlan: his hands were 
longer than the hands of other men. 

And Ullad mourned for him. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER XVI. 

(a) Ben Cor, now called corruptly Bangor, means, the hill of the 
dance. 

(b) We learn from Herodotus, in the 31st chapter of Thalia, that 
the judges of Persia held their office for life, unless convicted of 
some crime ; every passage in these chronicles relating to the 
judges, reminds us of the usage in Persia respecting this order of 
the society. Herodotus tells us, in the 25th chapter of Terpsichore, 
that Catalyses had Sisamnes, one of the judges, put to death for cor- 
ruption in his office, and ordered his skin to he fixed over the tribu- 
nal to deter his successor from the like evil practices. There are 
more ways of corruption than that of .taking brihes from suitors* 
little doth a law, which renders a judge secure of his seat so long as 
he is not convicted of one or many species of mal- practices, aval. 



OF ER1. 317 

to make him independent and honest, whilst he hath friends and 
children to be provided for at the public charge, under a govern- 
ment that avowedly depends on corruption for its support, nay, its 
very existence. 



CHAP. XVII 

The reign o/" Eocaid, a space of twelve rings, from 
430 to 4 IS. 

Now Flonn having ceased, Ruidruide, the son of 
Cier, the brother of Fionn, was chosen king in 
L'tlad. 

And when the assembly of Eri were on Tobra'd, 

Eocaid king in Mumain was seated on the throne. 

Eocaid taketh delight in going upon the waters of 
the sea ; and he floated round Eri, and princes and 
nobles of Mumain accompanied him. 

And when he came to Dun Sobairce, Ruidruide 
called together the men of Uilad, and feasting and 
sports continued for one moon. 

Eocaid king in Gaelen spendeth all his days in 
the chase ; he giveth no rest to the wolves nor to the 
deer of Gaelen. 

Ruidruide instructed! the youth, he walketh in 
the ways of his race continually. 

Eri is in peace and contentment. 

And when Ruidruide had ruled nine rings, Du- 
bar died, and Toiscar was chosen Ard Olam of 
Ullad. 

And Eocaid ceased when he had ruled twelve 
rings. 



318 CHRONICLES 



CHAP. XVIII. 

The reign of Eocaid, Ardri, a space of Jive rings, 
from 418*0 413. 

LUG AD the son of Eocaid was chosen king in 
Mumain. 

And Eocaid king of Gaelen was chosen Ardri. 

In his name did Conuig his brother rule the land 
for the five rings after he had been chosen, then did 
he cease, having fallen from his horse nigh unto Buid 
Cloc. 



CHAP. XIX. 

reign of Lngad, a space of four rings, from 
413/a 409. 

CONUIG was not chosen to rule in Gaelen, yet 
did he continue to sit as the king. 

And Lugad the son of Lugad king in Mumain 
was called to the throne of Eri. 

And when he had ruled for four rings he died. 

And Airt the son of Eocaid was chosen king in 
Mumain. 



OF 



CHAP. XX. 

The reign of Comiig, king in Gaelen, a space of 
seven rings, from 409 to 402. 

Now the assembly were called together to Tobrad 
to choose Ardri. 

And Conuig was seated on the seat of the king of 
Gaelen. 

When the heralds having said aloud, 

" The throne is empty," 

Riddraide king of Uilad rose, and said, 

" Why sitteth Conuig on the seat of the king of 
Gaelen ?" 

And Conuig rose in haste, and said, 

" Doth the king of Ullad think to place a son of 
Seadna on the seat of Gaelen, should Conuig rise 
therefrom?" 

And Ruidruide said, " Not so : no such thought 
did ever enter into the mind of Ruidruide. 

" If Conuig hath been chosen in Gaelen, long may 
he keep the seat." 

Yet Conuig rose not to sit amongst the princes of 
the race of Gaelen. 

When Airt king in Mumain said, " Hath not Co- 
nuig been chosen ?" 

And Conuig rose, and said, " Did not Conuig 
rule Gaelen and Eri all the days of Eocaid his 
brother?" 

And Airt said, " It may not be." 

And iMurcad chief of J'.f.ag Lein rose, and said, 

" The princes and nobles of Gaelen are together, 
even here, what if Conuig be chosen On Tobrad?" 



320 CHRONICLES 

And Aod y chief of Aoimag, said, " Let the custom 
of Tainistact be told." 

And the custom was repeated, " Let every chief 
be chosen within his land." 

And Tornad chief of Ard Deas rose, and said, 

" Since the days of Eocaid Olam Fodla, this hill 
doth not belong to Gaelen. The king must be chosen 
on his own land." 

And the king of Ullad rose, and said, 

" When Conuig shall be chosen by the princes 
and nobles of Gaelen, within the land of Gaelen, 

" Though I would that he was seated on the 
throne of Eri t I will not consent to his taking the 
seat of the king of Gaelen, till chosen according to 
the usage of the law. 

" It is known unto all the children of the land, 
that peace and happiness did dwell therein in the 
days of Eocaid, during which time Conuig had all 
but the rightful name of king. 

" That peace may yet abide, Ruidruide doth be- 
seech Conuig to move on the way that the custom of 
Tainistact doth point out. 

" The mount of Gaelen is not far distant, we of 
Ullad will dwell in our tents round Tobrad till the 
return of our brethren." 

And Airt king in Mumain said likewise. 

And Conuig rose, and said, " Be it so." 

And the boards were spread, and mirth pre- 
vailed, 

And on the morrow all the princes and nobles of 
Gaelen moved towards Magnas. 

And Conuig was chosen, and they returned to 
Tobrad. 



OF ERI. > 321 

And Ruidruide had a feast got ready for them, 
and for all the assembly nigh unto Tobrad on the 
way from the mount of Gaelen: for Ruidruide said 
unto me, " Tcuoscar, the eye of the sons of Muredac 
is yet evil towards the children of Seadna; were the 
hoards spread on Tobrad, the malice of their tongues 
would equal the jealousy of their minds." 

And the hearts of all were filled with joy add 
gladness. 

And on the morrow when the assembly were to- 
gether in the high chamber of Teacmor, 

And the heralds said, "The throne is empty," 

The king of Ullad rose, and said, 

" Let Conuig king in Gaelen rule, Ardri" 

All held up their right hands. 

And Conuig, and all the princes and nobles of 
Gaelen, and Airt, and all the princes and nobles of 
Mumain went forth to Liafail, and the Ard Cruim- 
tear seated Conuig thereon, and he did place the 
asion on his head, and Airt king of Mumain laid the 
mantle on his shoulders, and they returned to the 
high chamber. 

Eri enjoyed peace all his days. 

And when he had ruled for seven rings, 

He went to the hills of Earb a hunting; and & 
stag of a great size escaped through the ring, and 
Conuig and the hunters pursued him. 

And Conuig did chase after him all that day, and 
on the next the hunters did draw nigh unto him, 
and he stood in a pool of shallow water. 

And Conuig took a pole from the hand of one or 
the hunters ; but those with him, thinking to stay 
him, 

VOL. II. Y 



322 CHRONICLES" 

He said, " Shall the soul of the son of Erimionn 
be touched with fear ?" 

And he ran into the water, and as he raised his 
hands to strike, the stag did dart his horns into the 
belly of Conuigj and did kill him. 

And his heap was raised nigh unto the water, and 
he was lamented, for he was beloved by the children 
of the land. 

And his heap is called, Tuam na Rig Beg~eag 
lac. (a) 

(a) TJic tomb of the undaunted king. 



CHAP. XXI. 

The reign of Airt, a space of six rings, from 402 to 

396. 

MURED AC the son of Eocaidj some time Ardri 
was chosen king in Gaelen. 

And Airt king in Mumain was chosen Ardri. 

And when he had ruled two rings, Rmdruide 
king in Uttad died, having ruled one score and teu 
rings. 

And Fiaca his son was chosen king in Uttad. 

And when Airt had ruled for the space of six 
rings, he died. 






OF ERI. 



CHAP. XXII. 

The reign ofOi\lio\, a space of nine rings, from 390 

to 387. 

OlLLIOL the brother of Airt was chosen king in 
Mumain: 

And he was also chosen Ardri. 

All the kings of the nations of Eri cherished 
peace; 

No contention was there through the land all the 
days of Oilliol of nine rings that he did live. 



CHAP. XXIII.' 



The reign o/*Eocaid the son ofAirt, a space of seven 
rings, from 387 to 380. 

JEOCAID the son of Airt was chosen king in 
Mumain. 

And he was chosen Ardri. 

When he had ruled three rings, Taoscar died, 
and Tinne was chosen Ard Olam in Ullad. 

And when Fiaca had ruled in Ullad for the course 
of seventeen rings, he ceased. 

And Airgeadmair his son was chosen king in 
Ullad. 

Eocaid ruled seven rings, theo did he die. 



Y 2 



324 CHRONICLES 



CHAP. XXIV. 

The reign o/* Airgeadmair, the son o/^Fiaca, a space 
of thirty rings from 380 to 350. 

Now Eocaid was no more, the assembly were on 
the mount of Mumain, and Daire the son of Oilliol 
was chosen king in Mumain. 

And Airgeadmair was chosen Ardri. 

And when he had ruled two rings the king in Gae~ 
len died, and Fiaca his son was placed on the seat 
of the king in that land. 

And when five rings passed whilst Airgeadmair 
was Ardri, Tinne died at Teacmor, whilst the as- 
sembly were together on Tobrad. 

And when the assembly separated, Ardri moved 
to Ullad with the princes, nobles, and O/am, heads 
of the people, and judges of that land. 

And the assembly stood on the mount, and the 
king did seat Ardfear his brother on the seat nigh 
unto the seat of the king. 

And the Olam gathered themselves together, and 
Docta was chosen Ard Olam of Ullad in the place 
of Tinne 

Now Airgeadmair excelled all the sons of Eri in 
comeliness of person, and in all manner of exercises 
none was like unto him ; 

He delighted in the chase, and in music, and the 
dance; when heused'the arms of the warrior in sport, 
no one appeared in grace equal to Airgeadmair. 

When he did listen unto the voice of another, at- 
tention sat on his ear ; when he spoke, a smile played 



OF'ERI. 325; 

upon his countenance, and his words were words of 
wisdom. 

What others said he did gainsay in gentlest sort, 
did he gainsay; this did make bold the priests, they 
did imagine for that his words were not loud, he was 
consenting unto their fancies. 

Now it was said that when the king went into Ul 
lad, what time he had ruled seven rings, Toil one of 
the priests,, whose desire was towards the mantle of 
Ard Cruimtear, thought to win the king by means 
of Cara his daughter, the loveliest of the lovely 
maids of Ullad. 

For on a day that it was known the king was to 
be at the dwelling of Aod chief of Maginis, Toil did 
thither go with the damsel, though he was not looked 
for. Thus was it said ; and when Airgeadmair re- 
turned to Dun Sobairce, Toil did stand before the 
king, young Cara in his hand. And they did tarry 
there for days and nights ; and when Toil did go to- 
wards the land of his dwelling, he took not the dam- 
sel with him, she did tarry with a kinswoman of her 
mother, nigh unto the house of the kingf. 

Whilst these things were passing,. Docta abided m 
Mur Olamain of Dun Sohairee, and a messenger 
came thither with words unto him from the king, 
saying, " Let Docta be in Dun So&amce," and I did 
go unto the king, and Ardfear the prince, and Qeolar 
the judge, was m his company. 

And the roll of the laws was spread out. 

And the book of Eopaid Olam Fodla was opened. 

And Airgeadmair said, " Twere good that Doela 
and Geolar knew that Toil one of the priests did 
come unto me,, and he did whisper in my ear,, , 



320 CHRONICLES 

" The nine laws to the nine Cruimtear from the 
beginning did stand aforetime on the roll of the laws 
of Ullad, at the head thereof; but ihe-Ofam did per- 
suade Cairbre, whilst he did abide in Mur Olamain, 
yea, after he did yield the seat of the king to Oilliol 
Bearngneat, when he was aged and infirm, and at 
the point of his utmost end, to suffer them to be 
wiped away from off the roll. 

"And Toil hath added moreover, 

" If the king would have the nine laws put in the 
place on which they did stand in the days of Eocaid 
the father of Cairbre? 

" Let Docta and Geolar examine the roll of the 
laws, and the book of Eocaid, that it be seen if Toil 
hath sure foundation for his words." 

And the writings were examined letter by letter, 
word by word, nought had been blotted out there- 
from. 

And the king said, " When I shall take my depar- 
ture for Teacmor, let Ardfear call unto him Toil 
one of the Cruimtear, and let the words on the roll 
of the laws, and on the book of Eocaid, be shown and 
read unto him in the presence of Docta and Geolar. 

" And, Ardfear, say thou unto Toil, 

" The fancies of the imagination of man have had 
no place on the roll of the laws of Ullad, nought hath 
been blotted out therefrom." 

And Ardfear dk\ as the king had said, and the an- 
ger of Toil did wax hot, and he did put many questions 
unto us concerning Baal, his words were in the ear 
of Docta the words of one from whom reason had 
departed. And he spake again and again in like 
sort, and he did utter his words with confidence. 



OF ERI. 327 

And he said unto Arrffear, " Thin kest not thou 
that the nine laws were revealed by Baal unto the 
nine Cruimtear from the beginning ?" 

And Ardfear said, " Hath Baal revealed aught 
to Toil at any time?" And Toil said, "Nay; the 
book of Baal is closed for ever, yet doth he speak, 
but his words are known to the Cruimtear only." 

And Ardfear said, " Whether thy words be of truth 
or falsehood, there are no means to judge save by 
reason, this is not the first time by many that Ardfear 
hath heard the words spoken now by Toil; my mind 
hath given entertainment thereto, and when I had 
turned them over in my thoughts, and called all my 
senses into council, my reason hath rejected them, 
as devices of art to impose on ignorance, instruments 
of terror to gallow the mind, thereby to bring man 
low." 

And Toil went his way wrathfully. 

And he journeyed to Teacmor, Cara with him ; and 
they stood before the king, and Toil dwelt in a tent 
of the king on Tobrad. 

And after a while Tin/and Cara did return to his 
dwelling in the land ofUlladin a car of the king. 

And Cara bare a male child ; and Toil became 
rich in cattle, and had all manner of store in abund- 
ance ; and Cara had provision as was fitting for the 
mother of the child of the king. 

Now the mantle of Ard Cruimtear had dropped 
from off Eneige, and when Toil said, " If it may be 
laid on the shoulders of Toil?" 

Argeadmair answered unto him in the presence of 
Docta, 

" Let Toll take even with the desire of his heart 



328 CHRONICLES 

of what belongeth unto Airgeadmair ; of what apper- 
taineth to the duty of the king let no man move his 
tongue/' 

But Toil ceased not to trouble the king, who 
would not be entreated, nor would he see the lovely 
Car a more. 

Now Airgeadmair had ruled for twelve rings in 
peace, when Daire king in Mumain, and Fiaca king 
in Gaelen, thought to trouble the king. 

And they were moving to join their forces together, 
and the king sent a messenger unto Dromt chief ot 
Oldanmact, saying, 

> " Let Dromt lead the host over the waters of 
Atkluan." 

And the king moved with the warriors of Ullad 
to the south, and he did meet the Danan beneath 
tl?e hill of Crocan, towards the sun's rising. 

And when Airgeadmair heard that the host of 
Mumain and of Gaelen were joined together nigh 
unto the fountain of the Buidaman, on the plain cf 
Oris, he did send an herald, and with him Merilac, 
chief of Clanidon, unto Daire and Fiaca, to say unto 
them, 

" What meaneth this gathering together of the war- 
riors of the land? Why is it that the blood of tht 
Gaal is about to be shed ?" 

And Daire answered unto Merilac, 

" We mean but to raise the song for the music of 
the harp of the king." 

Now Airgeadmair excelled all Erio\\ the harp. 

And Merilac answered, 

" If the groans of the dying be music to the ears 
of Daire 'twere well he was the first that sung." 



OF ERI. 329 

And ere Airgeadmair and the Danan came upon 
the men of Mumain and of Gaelen, Fiaca and the 
men of Gaelen fell off from Daire, and Daire moved 
in haste towards Mumain. 

And the king pursued after him, the men of Mum- 
ain stood not, till they passed the plain of Athdair, 
then they did gather themselves together on the hills. 

And the king bad the heralds say in the hearing 
of Daire, 

" Ardri moveth over the summits of the plain of 
Athdair, let none cross his way." 

And as he moved, Daire and the warriors of 
Mumain stood before him. 

And the battle had not long endured, when Daire 
fell, struck by a stone from a sling. 

And Lugad the son of Daire, a youth who had 
not counted more than sixteen rings, and had run 
out with two of his companions from the tents of the 
king of Mumain to see his father, when words came 
unto Bririg that Daire was on Athdair, fought by 
the side of his father. 

And when Daire fell, the men gave way, but JLu- 
gad threw himself on the body of his father, and he 
was brought unto the king, and Airgeadmair spake 
tenderly unto the youth. 

And the lad did beseech the king that he may go 
to raise the heap over the form of his father, and Air- 
geadmair said unto him, " Thou shalt go, my child, 
and I will bear thee company." 

And the heap of Daire was raised on the spot 
whereon he fell ; and the bards did raise his death- 
song, and Airgeadm-air did make a harp of Mumain 
join its voice to the voice of the harps of the min- 



330 CHRONICLES 

strels of the land, and the matrons and damsels did 
pour forth the piteous wailing; of lamentation for 
Daire was no more. 

And Airgeadmair did lay aside the harp, and he 
did move toward JLugad, who stood by the side of 
Cobtac the brother of Daire, and he did place him- 
self between Cobtac and Lugad. 

And Airgeadmair did raise the war-song of the 
king, and he did bewail Daire, Mumains pride, and 
he said, " The tongue of praise may move, the voice 
of admiration may be raised, when the ear heareth 
not, flattery hath no share therein, therefore shall the 
sound of the voice of Airgeadmair the son of Er be 
heard, proclaiming the glory of Daire, Ibers fa- 
vourite son. 

" Airgeadmair must be silent of Fiaca king ofGae- 
len, his ear heareth him not, else " 

And Cobta and Lugad, and of the nobles of Mum- 
ain, did return with Airgeadmair to the tents of the 
king, and when the king was about to return towards 
Teacmor,\\e presented unto Lugad his horse Ainleog, 
the most beautiful of all the horses of the king, and 
he did embrace Lugad tenderly, and he did give him 
the hand of friendship. 

And Ceat the brother of Dromt led the host of the 
Danan back to Oldanmact, and Dromt accompanied 
Ardri to Teacmor. 

Now Ardri sent a messenger unto Fiaca king in 
Gaelen, saying, 

" Let Fiaca answer in the high chamber of Teac- 
mor on Tobrad, why he did bring forth the warriors 
of Gaelen against Ardri" 

And when the assembly were together, Cobta the 



OF KRJ. 331 

brother of Daire sat on the seat of the king of Muni- 
ain, having been chosen in that land. 

A\\(\ Ardri rose, and said, 

" Let the king of Gaclcn say, why. he led forth the 
warriors against Ardri" 

And Fiaca said, 

" Daire moved the men of Mumain to enter Gae- 
len, and when the king was told thereof, lie slighted 
the tidings, saying, Daire and Fiaca know one the 
other better." 

" And therefore," said Airgeadmair, "as the king 
stopped not the foot of Daire against Fiaca, both 
joined their hands against Ardri: will the assembly 
of Eri give weight to these light words of Fiaca? 

"Is it just that the Gaal shall be roused from re- 
pose for nought ? 

" Ullad driveth off no prey, what if the king of 
Gaelen pay Eric one thousand cows?" 

And Fiaca rose, and said, " Is Mumain to bear no 
portion thereof?" 

And Ardri said, 

" Let every tongue be silent of Daire beneath his 
heap, he hath paid the Eric of his life, therefore 
Airgeadmair hath mourned." 

And the chief secretary repeated the words of 
Ardri, saying, " What if the king of Gaelen pay Eric 
one thousand cows ?" 

And it was so. 

And when the cattle were driven on the lands of 
Ardri, he bad inquiry to be made of the herdsmen 
to whom the cattle had belonged; and the men said, 
" They were cessed on the Gaal" 



*>* CHRONICLES 

And when the words were told unto the king, he 
said, " Let the cattle be driven back to their owners. 
Shall the Gaol pay for the transgression of the king? 
Let cattle of Fiaca be sent, his hath been the fault, 
Jet him pay the Eric'' 

And it was so. 

And the king bad his herdsmen to drive the cattle 
to the land of the chief of Oldanmact, and he sent a 
messenger with words for Dromt, " The Danan 
drin keth of the bitterness of the cup of tribute, it is 
good he tasted of the sweets of the horn of justice." 

And Ardri moved towards Dun Sobairce, and the 
assembly were called to the mount, 

And all the words concerning Fiaca and Daire, 
and of the war Fiaca had caused, were read aloud, 

And all the words on the roll of the laws, 

And all the writings were read. 

And none stood on the mount for justice. 

And the feasts were prepared at Dun Sobairce, 
and the king called out the hunters ; and the warri- 
ors moved as Seadna taught, and they fought in 
sport. 

And the king moved to Teacmor. 

Ardfear ruleth in Ullad in truth and justice. 

Now words came unto Ardri, saying, " Fiaca stir- 
reth up Cobta, but Cobta is loth to move.'*. 

And Ardri preserved the peace of Eri. 

And when Airgeadmair had ruled one score and 
two rings, Ardfear prince of Er died > and Ullad 
mourned for him. 

And Ardri seated his son Sadoirn on the seat 
next to the seat of the king in Ullad, and he gave 



OF ERI. 333 

him a charge to nourish the spirit of the youth, and 
to keep the judges within the bounds of the laws, 
and the priests in their places. 

And when Ardri had ruled one score and six 
rings, Fiaca king in Gaelen died, and Duac his son 
was chosen. 

And in one moon afterwards died Docta, and En- 
rag lit was chosen Ard Otam of Ullad. 

And when Ardri had ruled one score and eight 
rings, Cobta king in Mumain died, and Lugad the 
son of Daire was chosen to rule in that land. 

And when Airgeadmair had ruled one score and 
nine rings, and the assembly of Eri were on Tobrad, 
the king did see clearly that the minds of Duac and 
of Lugad were evil to him wards. 

And Lugad presented a horse to Ardri; but he 
was given as to quit a debt, the cold hand came not 
from a warm heart. 

And when the assembly separated, Ardri went to 
Dun Sobairce. 

And he spoke to the princes and nobles of the 
hatred of the children of lolar to the sons of Er be- 
cause of Muredac. 

' And he said, " The eyes of many of the princes of 
Iber look sideways on me for the love of Duac to- 
wards Seadna; and the tale of the death of Daire 
hath roused Lugad. 

"Twere good the chiefs did read the writings of 
Seadna, and that the Gaal practise the ways of war 
according to the words thereof." 

And Ardri returned to Teacmor. 

Now the minds of Duac and of Lugad were made 



334 I CHRONICLES 

manifest ; what though the words of Duac were 
words of friendship, his heart was full of deceit. 

The name of Cimon Breac still soundeth in the 
ear of Duac, and Lugad rnoveth to his passion for 
revenge. 

Whilst these two did smile upon Airgeadmair, 
they did conspire against him, and they thought to 
draw Dromt unto them, sajing, " Jf theDanan ad- 
nered to Iber or to Erimionn, as he doth to Er, Ol- 
danmact would feel the lighter." 

But their words were of no avail in the ear of 
Dromt, he told all their sayings unto the king ; still 
they did nought openly. 

Now Ardri went from Teacmor to Mionn Alta, 
where dwelleth Erid the brother of the chief of Ar- 
deas, and he did go from thence to the waters of Ra- 
mar to fish. 

And words came unto him that the host of Mu- 
main, led by Lugad, was then nigh unto the mount 
of Gaelen, and that Duac and the warriors of Gaelen 
were joined unto them. 

And Ardri did send messengers to Dromt, and 
unto Badoirn, to speed with their forces. 

And he called together the warriors of Ullad nigh 
x unto him ; and words were brought unto him that 
Lugad and Duac were moving in their strength. 

And Ardri set forward, and when he drew nigh 
unto the waters of Aman Dub, where they mingle 
with the waters of Buidamnn, the host of Mumain 
and of Gaelen were espied moving towards Ardri, 

And Airgeadmair said, " I will pass over the wa- 
ters in the face of the host." 



OF fiRI. 335 

Now the water was scarce in its channel, the air 
was very hot, Baal was on the summit of his that 
day's course, the king wore a bonnet on his head, a 
light cloak had covered his shoulders, and he took 
it from off him ; the asion and mantle of Ardri were 
in jTeacmor. 

And whilst Ardri was preparing to pass over the 
waters, in the sight of the men of Mumain and of 
Gaelen, some few of the Danan and some of Firgneat 
were seen coming towards him, and those of Gaelen 
gave hack, and after a while those of Mumain stood. 

And when Ardri passed over the waters of Aman- 
dub, and the men of Gaelen saw but few of Oldan- 
mact and Geintir join themselves unto him, they 
were assured, and they came forward to those of 
Mumain, and the whole host moved towards Ardri. 

And Airgeadmaiv said, " Let the heralds say 
aloud, Ardri rnoveth towards Teacmor" 

And Ardri said, " Let the men of Gaelen feel the 
weight of Ullad" 

And Airgeadmair came down from his horse, and 
he sought Daac ; and the heralds called upon the 
name of Duac, saying, " Is Duac ashamed to shew 
his face?" But Daac came not into the presence of 
Airgeadmair. 

Now the little band of Ardri had made the men 
of Gaelen turn their backs, when Lugad surrounded 
the king, and ere Badoirn, with two Catha of the 
warriors of Ullad, had passed over the waters, Air- 
geadmair,\iad fallen, covered with an hundred 
wounds. 

Now when it was known that Airgeadmair had 
fallen, Duac, and the men of Gaelen stole off to Te- 



CHRONICLES 

acmor, and Duac did enter into the house of the 
king. 

But Lugad and the warriors of Mumain fought 
whilst light was on the plain. 

And on the morrow the host of Mumain moved to 
Teacmor. 

There was a great slaughter; and Badoirn said, 
" What though the day that hath last passed is a day 
of mourning for JSri, it will stand for ever a day of 
glory for Ullad." 

And the slain were collected, and a mighty heap 
was raised. 

And Meilig-t\ie bard chaunted theXdeath song, 
and Badoirn poured forth the war-song, and he said 
aloud, 

" Let this heap be called Ard Breacan(a) for 
ever." 

And what remained of the host of Ullad, and of 
Oldanmact, and ofGeintir, moved towards Dun So- 
bairce, with the form of Airgeadmair. 

And on the second day the thousands of Ullad 
were seen ; and when they heard what had happed, 
they wrung their hands, and smote their breasts, and 
raised the cry of lamentation ; and they did beseech 
Badoirn to raise the heap of the king even there, and 
to speed to Teacmor. 

But Badoirn said, " The seat of the king in Ullad, 
and the throne of Eri are empty, it were not good 
that we set our faces towards Teacmor, neither let it 
bethought that the children of Ullad were weary of 
the weight of Airgeadmair, for that they let it fall by 
the way ."(ft) 

And all said, " Tor Dun Scbairce" 



OP ERI. 337 

And the form of Airgeadmair was borne by his 
five sons, the glory of the race of Er, the pride of 
7/ar/, and laid in Cluaneac, where the eye of Airge- 
admair did delight to look on his horses as they 
grazed thereon. 

And there hath his heap been raised. 

And all Ullad chaunted the death-song, and all 
the warriors of the land poured forth the war-song, 
calling him 

Airgeadmair the brave and magnanimous. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER XXIV. 

(a) The place is this day called Ardbraccan ; the meaning of the 
word is " the heap of the party-coloured/' because there were laid 
beneath it men of all tht nations ofr/. 

(h) In divers passages of these chronicles, the strict observance of 
the interment of the dead is apparent. 



CHAP. XXV. 

The reign o/*Duac, a space often rings, from 350 

to 340. 

Now the assembly were on the mount of Ullad, and 
Badoirn, the first-born of Airgeadmair, was chosen 
king of Ullad, with one voice. 

And whet! the assembly of Eri came together, 
Duac king in Gaelen was chosen Ardri. 

When he was chosen, the rage of Lugad exceeded, 
he told aloud, in the hearing of the people, that a co- 
venant was between him and Duac, that if he would 

VOL. II. Z 



CHRONICLES 

help with all his might to humble the children of 
Er, Lugad and Duac would part Eri between them. 

Now Duac denied not (he covenant, but he said 
that Lugad put not forth his strength, and acted de- 
ceitfully, therefore was strife between them all the 
days of Duac. 

Ullad enjoy eth repose, Badoirn turneth not his 
eye nor his thoughts from Ullad; he tendeth the fire of 
the youth of the land, and entereth into the schools 
continually. 

He saith, " Little doth it avail that Eocaid Olam 
Fodla did build Mur Olamain of Teacmor ; what 
though the Olam breathe the air of wisdom within 
the walls thereof, the master lacketh disciples, if one 
of the race of Er sitteth not on the throne of Eri. 

" Therefore the chiefs, and princes, and nobles of 
Gaeleu, and of Mumain, are ignorant of the ways of 
truth ; by which means the Gaal are neglected. 

" On the lessons of knowledge they set no greater 
value than the storm regardeth the ship stored with 
precious merchandize: the violence of uncurbed pas- 
sions overbearing reason. 

" Those of Gaelen incline their ear to the priest. 

" Those of Mumain delight in the battle, as a pas- 
time of sport; they sing amidst the groans of the dy- 
ing, they dance as they drive away the spoil. 

" Ullad must leave them to follow their course; 
over ignorance, sooner or later, truth and wisdom 
must prevail." 

Now when Duac had ruled ten rings, Lugad had 
strengthened himself, and he made war against Duac; 
and Lugad moved in his might through Gaelen, and 
he drove the men of Gaelen before him, even to Mag- 



OF .ER1. 339 

nets ; there Duac and the warriors stood together to 
stop the foot of Lugad on the way to Teacmor. 

And the battle was fought on Magnus, round 
about the mount of Gaelen, and a mighty slaughter 
was made: the priests did pour the sound of their 
voice into the hearts of the men of Gaelen. 

And Lugad bad the heralds say aloud, 

" Warriors of Mumain, silence the priests, clear the 
ways to Teacmor, Lugad of Iber is on his course to 
Tobrad.* 

Nought could stop the foot of Lugad, many did 
fall on that day. 

And Dmc, Ardri, fell covered with wounds from 
the Gaol ; he showed not his face to Lugad in the 
battle. 



CHAP. XXVI. 

The reign o/Xugad the son of Daire, a space of four 
rings, from 340 to 336. 

Now Lugad and the warriors of Mumain kept on 

their pace to Teacmor, and Lugad entered into the 

house of the king. 

And messengers went through the land, saying 1 , 
" Let the assembly of Eri be together on Tobrad 

to chuse Ardri, what time Baal shall have run this 

Rat ha of his course." 

Now time passed ere the king could be chosen in 

Gaelen ; so great was the slaughter of the, princes and 

nobles, on Magnas, all Gaelen was disturbed. 



340 CHRONICLES 

. 

And many of the chiefs were not chosen, and 
there was no king in Gaelen, what time the messen- 
gers had said the assembly were to be on Tobrad. 

And when Badoirn, and the princes and nobles of 
Ullad, and Magn chief of Oldanmact, and the chiefs 
of the Danan were on Tobrad, king, princes, and 
nobles of Gaelen being absent, 

Btidoirn said unto Lugad and unto Magn, 

" It may not be that Ardri should be known, the 
chair of the king, and the seats of the princes and 
nobles of Gaelen being empty." 

And Li/gad said, 

" Had the warriors of Minnain swept king, princes, 
and nobles, from off the face of Gaelen, must Eri 
have gone astray without a king ? To your schools, 
men of Ullad, and talk in words of wisdom of Lu- 
gad the son of Daire, of the race of Iber, Marcac 
the first- born of the hero, whilst he sitteth on the 
throne ruling the land." 

And Badoirn, and all the princes and nobles of 
Ullad, 

And Magn, and all the chiefs of the Danan, took 
their departure to the lands of their dwelling till the 
king and nobles of Gaelen should be chosen. 

And Lugad and the princes and nobles of Mum- 
ain, (for the nobles of Mumain were chosen in haste 
in the place of those fallen in Magnus.") entered into 
the high chamber, and in this sort was Lug-ad, Ardri. 

And when the time came, Lugad having sttt for 
one ring, that the messengers were to call the as- 
sembly to Teacmor, they went not forth. 

And Badoirn sent Aod his first-born to Magn, 
with words, saying, 



OF ERI. 341 

" Magn may not yield tribute unto the king of 
Mumain, and pay respect to the laws of Eri. 

" When Lugad shall send to Magn, and send he 
will, (he is confident, brave, and thoughtless,) make 
thou preparation through Oldanmact, and send the 
words of Lugad to Dun Sobairce" 

And Aod did go to the dwelling of Magn, and he 
did repeat the words of his father unto the chief. 

And Aod saw Maca, the beauteous daughter of 
Magn : 

And the eye of the damsel spake unto his heart 
tenderly; in the silence of their tongues their eyes 
held converse deliciously. 

And Aod returned to Dun Sobairce: and when he 
had told unto his father the words of Magn, saying, 
" Magn will do according to the words of Badoirn" 
jdorfsaid, " My eye hath looked on Maca the daugh- 
ter of Magn; the desire of Aod is towards the damsel, 
what saith my father ?" 

And Badoirn said, " Peradventure, when thy eye 
was pleased, it hath hurried away thy heart ere thought 
was called upon ; so passion, become too hot for judg- 
ment, will flee all remedy, till it shall waste itself in 
its own fire. 

" Let Aod return to the tents of Magn, and let 
discretion have its due portion in thy election ; and 
then" 

And thither did Aod return, and he did take the 
maid, her father consenting'thereunto. 

And he did abide at Dun Sobairce for a time. 

Now Ros, prince of Er, died, and he was child- 
less, and Aod did say unto his father and his bre- 



CHRONICLES 

fhren, " If Aod may rai^e up his tents on Ardscealaet, 
he will perform the covenant, and he will be nigh 
unto Oldanmact." (a) 

And the words of Aod were pleasing in the ears 
of his father and his brethren. 

And Aod did raise his tents on Ardscealaet. 

Now two rings had passed since Lugad had 
seated himself on the throne. 

And no demand had been made for tribute on O/- 
danmact. 

But Badoirn king in Uttad having ceased, and 
Aod being chosen in the place of his father, 

And Eocaid the brother of Duac, chosen king in 
Gaeleu, having taken Darina the daughter of Lugad, 
Lugad manifested his thoughts. 

And Magn having come to Ardscealaet, for Aod 
continued to dwell thereon, Lugad sent a messenger 
thither to know the cause thereof. 

And Aod answered to the ear of the messenger, 
" When Lugad shall call together the assembly to the 
high chamber of Teacmor on Tobrad, Aod will answer 
to the words of Lugad in the presence of Eri" 

And when Lugad heard the words of Aod, he 
swore by the sword of Daire his father, that he 
would humble the pride of Ullad. And he sent 
forth heralds through Eri, and he did put words of 
untruth in their mouths concerning Aod. 

When tidings of the doings and sayings of Lugad 
reached the ear of the king of Ullad, he called toge- 
ther the warriors, and they flocked to the banners of 
the chiefs, and all gathered round the king. 

And when Magn heard of the motions of the men 



OF EKI. 34$ 

in Ullad, and heard no words from Aod, his spirit 
was troubled ; and he sent letters by the hand of a 
messenger unto Aod, saying, 

" Doth not the king of Ullad desire the company 
of Magn chief of Oldanmact, the father of Maca, the 
partner of the secret thoughts of Aod? 

" What though Magn hath not been yet tried, per- 
adventure he may prove himself worthy the friend- 
ship of Aod?" 

And Aod answered by the hand of the messenger, 

" Lugad hath sworn by the sword of his father, 
that he will humble the pride of Ullad. 

" Let then Aod beseech Magn to reserve his ear 
for the hearing of tidings of the battle : the son of 
Marcac thinketh to ride over the children of Er. 

" Let Oldanmact couch in the posture of the grey- 
hound ready to spring." 

And Aod said to the chiefs } " L^t the battle be 
fought forth of Ullad? 

Now Lugad was full of the conceit of his own 
mind, and he swore that he would drive Aod before 
him unto the walls of Dun Sobaircc, and drag him 
thence. 

And he assembled a mighty force, the fiower, 
yea, of the blossoms of Mumain, and he moved as 
far as to Dun Dalgan vaunting! y. 

And the host of Ullad moved as Seadna taught : 
those who fought on their feet were not mixed with 
those who fought on horses ; nor did the slingers mix 
with the archers, nor were those who used the sword 
with either. 

And when Aod saw Lugad and a mighty host 



CHRONICLES 

stand on Ullad, he sent words through the warriors, 
saying, 

" The king of Ullad thought not to have seen Lu- 
gad and his cattle-drivers so soon. This is the first 
let it be the last day of our meeting. Let them be 
swept from off the land." 

And the host moved forward ; they gave not time 
to the men with Lugad to shew the front of the 
warrior : the weight of Ullad oppressed them sud- 
denly. 

Whilst the warriors stood face to face, many of the 
host of Mumain fell, Ullad untouched. 

And Aod was on his horse Croman, and he bad 
the heralds to say aloud, " Aod king of //// stand- 
eth on the way between Ardscealact and Teacmor: 
will the Ardri of Mumain force him back?"() 

And Lugad followed the herald at his very heels ; 
and when he came in view of Aod, he drove furiously 
towards him. 

And Aod hasted towards Lugad, saying, " By 
this sword of Airgeadmair, Lugad shall move no 
further on the soil of Ullad." 

And ere the clamour of battle was raised, the 
shouts of victory were sent forth, 

Lugad was no more. 

And the warriors of Ullad gave a loose to their 
anger. Many of the warriors of Mumain fell ; and 
those who survived, escaped forth of Ullad with 
speed, leaving the form of Lugad on the earth. 

And as the men were on the race, and Lugad on 
the ground in death, Girad the young chief of Rath- 
bot y said aloud, 



OF ERI. 345 

" Are the men from Mumain in such haste, that 
they tarry not to bear away the king?" 

And the king of Ullad reproved Girad for his 
words, saying, " Lugad hath erred, hath he not 
paid dearly for his transgression ?". 

And when the host of Ullad was counted, the he- 
rald of the king raised the shield over the head of 
Aod. 

And Aod wrote unto Magn; and these are the 
words thereof: 

" Lugad lieth in death on the plain of Dundalgan: 
those who had followed his steps are striving one 
with the other in a race forth of Ullad. 

" All the host of Ullad will move towards the land 
of their dwelling, save four who will be borne in 
death, and one score and three hnrted, conveyed on 
the cars of war: what remains, the lips of the mes- 
senger will tell unto thee." 

And the heap of Lugad w?.s raised by the men of 
Ullad on the spot where he fell. 

And Aod and the warriors of Ullad moved to the 
tents of Aod. 

And the king suffered them not to depart to their 
homes till nine days were fulfilled. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER XXVI. 

(a) Ardscealnct. This place stands in the centre of Ullad, had 
been the portion of a prince of Er,on condition of forwarding all the 
messengers through Eri, as the name imports. Aod on the decease 
of Ros, the prince childless, received this portion with the covenant, 
and dwelled there. 

(b) Aod calls Lugad, Ardri of Mumain in derision ; he did not ad- 
mit his title to the throne of Eri, as his election was not according 
to law. 



CHKONICLES 



CHAP. XXVII. 

The reign of Aod the son of Badoirn, a space of 
twelve rings, from 3,30 to 324. 

LtVGAD having fallen on the plain of Dundalgan, 

Aongus his brother was chosen king in Mumain. 

And when the assembly were together on Tobrad, 
Aod king in Ullad was chosen Ardri. 

And Aod did place Ciombaot the son of Fionn, the 
son of Airgeadtnair on the seat nigh unto the seat of 
the king on the mount of Ullad; and Ciombaot dwell- 
eth on Ardscealact. 

And when Aod cometh to Ullad, he abideth in 
Dun Sobairce a few days, and from thence he taketh 
a course through the land : and he goeth to Oidan- 
mact, and with him goeth Maca, that she may see 
her kindred. 

And when Aod had ruled three rings, Enraght 
died, and Maol was chosen Ard Olam of Ullad. 

Eri is in peace on every side. 

Aod walketh in the way of his fathers, he maketh 
Eocaid Olam Fodla his boast and his glory. 

Ciombaot hath not been excelled by one of the 
race. 

Now when Aod had ruled for the course of twelve 
rings, he journeyed from the tents of Ciombaot to- 
wards Oldanmact, and Maca was with the king. 

And he passed to the tents of the chief of Rathbot, 
and from thence he went to the waters of Aron, 
through the land of Feargneat. 

And as he stood on the top of the side of the boat 



OF ERI. 347 

in which he was about to be borne on the waters on 
the bosom of Geinter, 

As he reached his hand to Maca, that she may 
ascend into the boat also, the foot of Aod slipped, 
and the right side of his head fell down on the top 
of the boat, and his blood gushed forth, and he moved 
not () 

And the children of Firgncat gathered themselves 
together round the king; and they bare him towards 
the dwelling of Ciombaot, Maca ministering unto him 
on the way. 

And on the day after the day he was laid down 
in the tent of Ciomlaot he died. 

And there is his heap raised, and the children of 
Eri do lament him. 

(ft) See the map. This place was called Uisgruad, the red water, 
now corrupted to Easruad. 



CHAP. XXVIII. 

The reign of Ros tKe son of Dilmain the son of 
Airgeadmair, a space of one ring, from 324 to 
323. 

WHEN the princes and nobles ctfrne to the mount 
to say, who was to sit on the seat of the king iu 
Ullad, 

Girad chief of RatJtbot rose, and said, 

What though there be nought to gainsay the 
words of the princes of Er and nobles of Ullad in 
the choice of oe of the race, as seenieth fit in their 
eyes, yet have our fathers not passed by tbe first born 



348 CHRONICLES 

without sufficient cause, rejection being as a stain on 
such a one. 

* All the sons of Airgcadniair the magnanimous 
have ceased. Badoirn sat in the place of his father, 
Aod the son of Badoirn is no more, his only child 
a daughter, and in youth, Ros the son of Dilmain 
hath shunned the haunts of men, yet is he stored 
with wisdom. 

" It is not to be said, for that he delighteth not in 
things wherein other men have joy, he is not fit to 
rule. 

" The name tf Ciombaot is famed through Eri; he 
desireth not for power bought at so great a price as 
e'en one evil thought of R&s" 

And Ciombaot rose, and said, 

" Thanks to the chief of Rathbot. What if Ros 
be chosen king in UlladT 

And all raised up the right hand. 

Now Ros was not on the mount, nor could one 
say where he might be found. 

And Ciombaot- said, " Let the princes and nobles 
come unto Dun Sobairce, and messengers shall be 
sent out in quest of Ros" 

And it was so. 

And Ciombaot did write words, and he did send 
the same words by the hands of each of the messen- 
gers unto Ros, saying, 

" Ros hath been called on by the voice of all the 
princes and nobles of Ullad; Ciombaot hath given 
the word of promise that he will not slight their 
love; Ciombaot will relieve him from all trouble, 
whilst Ros shall continue to relish solitude." 

And Ros was found walking alone on the margin 



OF ERI.. 349 

of the waters of Foist, in the land of Ardtain, and 
he was intreated, and he came to Dun Sobairce. 

And he walked to the mount; and when he heard 
the voice of the princes and nobles saying, " Let 
Ron sit king in Ullad" he became pale, then blushed, 
then trembled ; and as he stood to receive the asion 
and mantle of the king, his foot slipped, and he was 
like to fall. 

And he reached his hand to Ciombaot, and he 
said, with bashful gentleness, " If Ciombaot will 
abide near unto me, my foot and all my steps for 
times to come will stand and move in the way they 
ought." 

And when the assembly returned to Dim Sobairce, 
the king sat at the board with the princes and no- 
bles, though constrainedly. 

And on the next day he said to Ciombaot, 

"Abide thou at Z>/;M Sobairce, take no note of 
me." And he went his way. 

Now the assembly of Eri were on Tobrad, and 
Ciombaot had besought the king of Ullad to go thi- 
ther with the princes and nobles of the land, and to 
take his seat in the high chamber. 

Arid when the heralds said, " The throne is 
empty,*' 

The chief of Larne rose and said, 

" What if JRos son of Dihnain son of Airgcad- 
mair, of the race of Er, the king of Ullad, take the 
throue?'\ 

And all held np their hands. 

He went not forth to Liafail; Magn placed the 
asion on his head, and the chief of Larne laid the 
mantle on his shoulders. 



350 CHRONICLES 

And he did say and do in all things as became 
the king. 

And the boards were spread, and abundance and 
over, and joy and mirth abided on Tobmd. 

And when the writings had been read, 

And none stood an-?Fobrad for justice, 

Ardri went to Mur O /amain of Te.awnor, and he 
did discourse with the Olam and with the scho- 
lars. 

And when the assembly were to separate, Ardri 
said unto Contra/, a prince of Er, " Abide thou in 
Teacmor for Ros ; lay nought up of what belongeth 
unto the king ; and what thou needest not, give -unto 
the bards and minstrels, and the stranger on his 
way; bestow not to him that hath enough. When 
thou art about to minister unto any one, and hearest 
the voice of thanks, stop not thy hand ; but when thy 
ear hear (the tongue of flattery extolling ihee more 
than thou deservest, for as I hear Congal thou art 
but as another man, keep back the gift, if the word 
of promise foreran it not ; never break thy word 
once spoken, therefore be cautious how it pass thy 
lips." 

And Ardri returned with the princes and nobles 
of Uliad as far as the waters of Eider; then lie said 
unto Ciombaoty " Go thou to Dnn Sobairce. Had I 
whereof to say unto thee, that thou fcnowest not of, 
I would tell it unto thee." 

And Ros took his departure alone on his feet to- 
wards the sun's rising, by (the side of -the waters of 
the salt sea. 

And when i one ring had '.passed after lie 1 had been 
chosen, words came to Ciombaot saying, 



OF ERI. 351 

44 Ros lieth on the bed of sickness in the land of 
Maginis" 

And thither hasted Ciombaot with the bearer of 
the tidings. 

And he found the king in a little tent, and of the 
Gaal ministering unto him. 

And Ciombaot sought to prevail on him to come to 
Dun Sobairce, bnt he would not, saying, "Was I 
willing, my strength sufficetli not, my end is n-ear at 
hand. Hear my words; thou wilt be chosen *k ing 
in Ullad\ all tongues speak in praise of thee; though 
the owner expccteth no reward, praise deserved 
adorneth the wearer. Put not thy trust in an ambi- 
tious noble, nor a poor glutton. 

" Shouldest thou incline towards a man, and suf- 
ferest him to draw nigh unto thee, and w-hen thou 
comest to know him better, thou findest him worth- 
less, speak not abroad of such a one, telling his 
faults, least it be said, thou had lacked judgment 
for letting him come near unto thee at the first. 

" Thou art amongst the children of the land, thou 
must have their help, and they will lean on thee. 
Note, Ciombaot, it is safer to put confidence in a 
thousand women than in one man ; man is treacher- 
ous, he is full of deceit. Use woman tenderly, 
and she will return thy tenderness one thousand 
fold." 

And the king grew very weak, and Ciombaot -did 
beseech him to iet the physician come tunto him. 

But he would not, saying, *' 1 need him not to 
tell me the materials of which I aia composed are 
wasted, not to be supplied." 



352 CHRONICLES 

And Ciombaot remained with him through the day 
and night ; and all things needful were brought for him, 
but he did reject them, saying, " In two days more 
this moon will change her form, and Ros will change 
his state, then what will he need ? What an eternal 
craving man hath, yet how little can he consume." 

And he said unto Ciombaot. 

" Whilst yet I may speak unto thee,all those things 
which now I am said to possess, do with them as 
shall seem fit to thee, only of the cattle of the king, 
let the clan of this land have wherewith to stock it 
fully. I proved them ere they knew of who I was ; 
they found me poor, thereby am I perfect in their 
free thoughts. 

" As to my heap, let it be raised by the side of 
e'en this little brook., no higher than 1 did stand in 
life, my bonnet on my head. 

" I will not say unto thee, Leave me now, Ciom- 
baot ; I think not thou wouldst do my bidding hav- 
ing so said, and for that all my remaining time of life, 
it would pain my spirit if you did. 

" The hand of friendship, large and heavy as the 
warrior's shield, yet is as light as the smallest feather 
of the little wren. 

" Ciombaot, store thy whole frame with the spirit 
of our great father Eocaid Olam Fodla, the wise and 
just." 

And as Ros had said, so it was ; when the moon 
changed her form, he changed his state, animation. 
departed from his bulk. 

And Ciombaot called together the GaaL as the 
king bad, and a little heap was raised over him ; and 
he was borne by the Gaol. 



OF ERI. 353 

And the matrons and damsels raised the dirge of 
lamentation at his heap ; he is called Diotreabac, 
for that he did shun the haunts of men. 

And Cionibaot returned to Dun Sobairce. 

Note. This prince is called Diotorb, and Latinized Diotorbus. 
His true name of Rot never heard of in the writings of the bards. 
He is called Diotreabac, which means a person shunning society. 
Diotorb is a miserable corruption, of no signification that 1 know of. 



2 A 



Cjje Cfnrmitcles of Ctt 



PART THE FIFTH. 



CHAP. I. 

The reign of Ciombaot, the son of Fionn son of 
Airgeadmair, a space of thirteen rings, from 323 
to 310. 

CIOMBAOT the son of Fionn, the sou of Air- 
geadmair was chosen king in Ullad. 

He was also called to the throne of Eri. 

He seated Ruidruide the son of Fearmor the 
son of Airgeadmair at Dun Sobairce, to sit for the 
king; and he went to Ardscealact, and dwelled 
there. And Maca dwelled there also with Maca the 
child of Aod and Maca; and Ciombaot did take the 
damsel unto him. 

And when Ciombaot had ruled for the space of 
three rings, Magn came to spend a while with his 
daughter, and he died there. And a messenger was 
sent unto Ceuct the first-born of Mngn; and Ceuct 
and of the nobles and Gaol of Oldanmact came to 
the tents of Ciombaot. 

And the form of Magn was laid within the earth, 



CHRONICLES OF ERI. 

nigh unto the heap of Aod; and four stones were 
fixed on their ends, one at the head, one at the 
feet, and one on either side of Magn, as he was 
laid, (a) 

And when Ciombaot had ruled for th course or 
iive rings, Maca the daughter of Magn died ; and an 
heap was raised over her between the heap of Aod 
and the bed of Magn. 

And Ciombaot went not unto Teacmor save when 
Eri was assembled on Tobrad; Blal prince of Er 
dwelt there in the house of the king. 

And Maca said unto Ciombaot, " Shall not Maca 
the daughter of Aod, the child of the daughter of 
JMagn, have an house as fair as Dun Sobairce, yea, 
as Teacmor." 

And she did begin to build an house durable 
nigh unto the tents of the king on Ardscealact. 

And when Ardri had ruled seven rings, Daire 
king iii Mumain died, apa.Reaciad the son of Airt, 
from Eunda, sometime Ardri, was chosen king in 
Mumain. 

And ere that ring was completed, Maol died, and 
Mtilige was chosen Ard Olam of Ullad. 

And the house was six rings in the building; ap4 
at the end of six rings, Ciombaot and Maca did enter 
and dwell therein. And as the princes and nobles 
of Ullad were at the boards within the house, and 
Maca sat beside Ciombaot, she rose from her seat, 
and she said aloud, 

" Men of Ullad, let this house be called for all 
the time that is to come Aodmagnmaca" 

And all present clapped their hands, and snouted, 



2A2 



356 CHRONICLES 

Thus Maca did honour unto her father, and unto 
her mother, and unto Magn the father of her that 
bore her. 

And when Eocaid kins: of Gaelen had ruled that 
land one score and eight rings, what time Ciombaot 
had ruled, Ardri, for eleven rings, Eocaid died, and 
Ugoine his son was placed on the seat of his fa- 
ther. 

Now the building of Aodmagnmaca had raised 
jealousy in the minds of the kings of Mumaln and of 
Gaelen. 

And when Ciombaot had ruled for twelve rings, 
and was at Teacmor, the assembly of Eri being on 
Tobrad, 

Words were heard of having passed from the lips 
of Reachad and of Ugoine. " Teacmor no longer 
standeth on Tobrad, is it not to be seen on Ard 
Aodmagnmaca? The pride of Er to were! h." 

But Ciombaot regarded not their words. 

And when the assembly broke up, Ardri moved 
to Aodmagnmaca, and all those of Ullad who were 
on Tobrad accompanied him ; and when they were 
there he said unto them, 

"It is my desire that the writings in Dun So- 
bairce should be borne thence, and placed on the 
table prepared for them, even here; and that the 
shields of the nobles of Ullad were raised up, even 
in this chamber of Aodmagnmaca as at Teacmor" 

And it was so. 

And CW>w6oJ added moreover, 

" Ciombaot purposeth to be seated on the seat of 
the king of Uiladt in this chamber, on the same 
day that the pillar was raised up on Magmortiamna 



357 

as a memorial for ever of the covenant between the 
Gaol of Sciot of Iber, and the Danan, even the 
second day after Baal had entered into the second 
chamber of his house Sgit ; 

" Therefore, let the princes, and nobles, and Olam, 
and heads of the people, and judges, and of the 
Gaol as list, meet Ciombaot at Dun Sobairce what 
time Baal shall enter into the last chamber of the 
house of his blessed fire : 

" And let the bards, and minstrels, and damsels, 
as seem good, be at Dun Sobairce: so shall the 
writings be borne hither with mirth, and joy, and 
music, dancing, and festivity." 

And when the day came that Ciombaot was at Dun 
Sobairce, all Ullad stood round about, and the he- 
ralds said aloud, 

" Let no eye be closed in sleep what time Baal 
shall come forth on the morrow." 

And on the morrow all the princes of Er, (Blat 
had come from Teacmor), and all the nobles of Ultad, 
and heads of the people, and all the Gaal (save the 
Olam and the judges, the bards and the minstrels), 
stood armed on the plain beneath Dun Sobairce, 
their eyes towards the sun's rising, 

And three cars stood at the entrance of the house 
of the king ; and as the first ray darted from the eye 
of Baal, the writings on the roll of the laws of Ullad, 
and the words of the custom of Tainiatact, were 
placed within the first car, and Foran judge of Dun 
Sobairce was seated therein; and it moved between 
the Gaal on this side and on that, till it reached the 
plain, (c) 



358 CHROiMCLES 

And another car received the writings of Eolus 
and the chronicles ofGaelag; and thereon was seated 
Send chief of the Olam of Mur Olamain of Dun So- 
bairce : and it moved to the plain. 

And into the third car entered Meilige, Ard Olam 
of Ullad, bearing in his hand the chronicles of Eri^ 
and the book of Eocaid Olam Fodla, and it moved 
to the plain also. 

And Ciombaot, and all the princes and nobles, 
were on their horses. 

And Maca was seated in a car of exquisite work- 
manship ; she was clothed in a mantle of Eri > and 
on her head she wore a bonnet of Oldanmact. 

And when Baal shewed himself, the king, princes, 
and nobles, raised up their swords. 

And the Gaol bowed the head, then struck their 
shields. 

And the bards poured forth the song, and the min- 
strels made the harps to speak, and the damsels sung, 

And the warriors danced to the sound of their 
shields, (d) and the whole host shouted, and cried 
aloud, " Baal prosper all the works of the king!" 

And the heralds called aloud, 

" For Aodmagnmaca /" 

And of the princes and nobles, some did lead the 
way. And the car wherein was Foran with the roll 
of the laws followed; and after the car moved the 
judges of Ullad. 

And of princes and nobles some did move after 
the judges. And the car that did bear Seadand the 
writings of Eolus and the chronicles of Gaelag, did 
move after them ; and the Olam of Dun Sobairce 
were after the car. 



OF 



af pritices and nobles some did follow after 
Olam of Dan Sobairce. 

And after theni was borne Meilige, Ard Olam of 
Ullad with the chronicles of Eri, and the writings 
ofgocaid Olam Fodla, the jnst lawgiver of JSH, and 
the Olam of Ullad went after. 

And princes and nobles followed, surrounding' the 
\vay that Ciambaot and Maca moved. 

Baal was favourable: tents were raised up for 
those who would enter therein. And on the ninth 
day the host reached to Aodmagnmaca. 

And all who came were feasted at the charge of 
the king. 

And lots were cast for the seats of the chiefs, and 
the shields were fixed up. 

And when the day came that Baal had entered 
the second chamber of his house Sgit, 

The king, princes, and nobles, and chiefs of the 
Olam, and heads of the people, arul judges named, 
entered into the chamber of Aodmagnmaca, and took 
their seats. 

And Ciumbaot rose from the throne, and said, 

" Six hundred and fourscore and sixteen rings 
hath Baal ran his course since the covenant of peace 
was made between the children of Iber, and the Da- 
nan; the memorial whereof was raised up on Mag- 
mortiomna, and set down on the chronicles of the 
Gaol. 

" Since whish <day even unto this, the sons of Er 
have not violated the words of their race ; therefore 
hath Ullad dwelled in peace, and ofttimes hath the 
friendship of Ulfad and Oldanmacl preserved the 
Depose of 



360 CHRONICLES 

"Add -did take a daughter of Oldanmact ; and 
Maca, the partner of the joy and grief, and all the 
secret thoughts of Ciombaot, is the daughter of 
Aod and Maca ; therefore will the band of love that 
bindeth Ulladantl Oldanmact be more firmly tied for 
times to come. 

" Hither hath been moved the words of the roll of 
the laws, and the writings of JEolus and Eocaid Olam 
Fodla, and the chronicles of the land. 

" What if they be placed on the table in the midst 
of this chamber within Aodmagnmaca ?" 

And it was so. 

And the king added, " What if the assembly of 
Utlad meet even here for times to come ?" 

And all held up the hand. 

And the writings were read, and they were right 
and good. 

And the heralds said without, " Stand any 
around Aodmagnmaca for justice?" And no voice 
answered. 

And in nine days all took their departure for the 
land of their abidings. 

And ere two moons had waned, Ciombaot lay 
on the bed of sickness, even unto death: and ere 
Baal had ran half his course through Cruining, he 
was no more, having ruled thirteen rings. 

And his heap is raised nigh unto the heap of 

Aod. 

Ciombaot was a just king; he was a good man, 
and wise, and valiant ; surpassed he was not by one 
of the race. 

He caused each one to move in his place. 

The law was not once invoked whilst Ciombaot 



ot Am. > 361 



ruled ; it slept securely under the guardianship of 
the children of the land. 

And all Ullad, with Oldanmact, mourned for 
him. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER I. 

() The mode of sepulture by the Danan differed from that of 
the Gaal of Sciot. 

(/;) The ceremony now performed with reference to the covenant 
between the Sciot and Danan, was meant to strengthen the bond of 
friendship and of union that subsisted between Ullad and Oldan- 
mact. 

The palace now built, called Aodmngnmaca, from the circum- 
stances of Aod kng of Eri, JMagn, chief of Oldanmact, and Maca 
his daughter, whom Aod had taken, being buried there, is at pre- 
sent called Ardmach. The posterity of Er had so little hope of 
keeping the sons of I her and Erimionn in peace, that they designed 
to confine themselves to their own proper kingdom, which they now 
adorned with a magnificent structure, whither they removed the rolls 
of the laws and the writings ; from which time Dun Sobairce ceased 
to be the seat of government. The building of this palace was an 
epoch from which dates were taken in aftertimes. 

(c) There were no written laws of Tainistact ; the meaning here 
and elsewhere is, that the words concerning Tainistact, as approved 
of in the time of Eocaid (Ham Fodlu should be read. 

(d) These were Corybuntcs. 



363 CHRONICLES 



CHAP. II. 

The reign <>/*Maca, the daughter of Aod, a space of 
one ring, from 310 to 309. 

ClOMBAOT having ceased, Eocaid the son of 
Fearmor the son of Airgeadmair, was chosen king in 
Ullad. 

And Maca, who had been the partner of Ciombaot, 
said unto him, " Wilt thou sit on the throne of 
EriT 

And Eocaid answered, " Nay ;" and he added 
moreover, 

" Eocaid desired not the seat of the king; in Ullad' 1 
The mind of Eocaid was oppressed; yea, his coun- 
tenance bore marks of sorrow. 

And Maca went to Teacmor, and dwelt in the 
house of the king. 

Now one Rat ha had been completed, and messengers 
went not forth to call the kings, princes, and nobles 
to Tohrady to choose Ardri. And when four moons 
were passed, Maca sent messengers through the land. 

And when the assembly were together, the door 
from the house of the king into the high chamber open- 
ed, and Maca entered, and stood before the throne, 

A little while, and she raised her voice, and said, 

" According to the custom of Tamistact, it is said, 
" Let not Eri abide one Raiha without Ardri; Ci- 
ombaol hath "eased now five moons and over, and 
Ardri had not been yet heard of but for Maca. 

" True, Maca is a woman, but she is the daughter 
of Aod a. son of Er, and of Maca from Maffn, of the 



Of ERI. S(>3 

raee of many kings, Maca was the partner of Cwm- 
baot. 

" As the men of Eri decline the throne, Maca will 
sit thereon. 

" Let the heralds say aloud, The throne is empty." 

And the herakls repeated the words. 

And Avngus the young prince of Ib Lugad said, 

** Shall MacOf be seated on the throne ?" 

And Eocaid king of Uilad rose from his seat, and 
went forth to Mur Olamain alone. 

Now all kept silence. 

And Aongus moved towards Maca, and he pre- 
sented unto her the asion, and placed it on her head ; 
and Lore prince of Mwrnain rose, and with a quick 
pace hasted to Maca, and he laid the mantle on her 
shoulders; and the princes seated Maca on the 
throne. 

And the assembly went forth of the high cham- 
ber. 

And the feasts were prepared for all that came. It 
might be thought that Eri had stood on Tobrad for 
the multitude; nought was heard but the song, and 
the voice of the harps ; there was dancing, and all 
manner of sports for one whole moon. 

And the writings were read. 

And Maca said, " Let the roll of the kings of Eri 
be read aloud." And when the chief secretary spoke 
the name ofCiombaot, he made an end. 

And Maca said, " Hath, it not been the custom 
since the days of Eocaid Olam Fodla, to set down 
the wameofArdri on the roll what time he hath been 
chosen ? 

And the chief secretary answered, " Yea." 



364 CHRONICLES 

And Maca said, " Wherefore then standeth not the 
name of Maca after Ciombaot ?" 

But none answered. 

And Maca came down from the throne, and she 
placed the roll before her, and she did set down her 
name therein ; and she returned, and stood before 
the throne, and said, 

" Shall not the name of Maca stand on the roll of 
the kings of Eri after Ciombaot?" 

And the young princes and nobles of Mumain 
shouted and clapped their hands, and cried aloud, 

" The name shall stand." 

And none stood on Tobrad for justice. 

The eye of Maca looked with thanks and regard 
on the king and princes and nobles of Mumain ; and 
she did make a great feast for them in Teacmor, and 
all the princes and nobles of Uilad, and Ceuct and 
the nobles of Oldanmact were invited ; but neither 
Ugoine nor one of the princes nor nobles of Gaelen 
were bidden, they took their departure from Tobrad 
sullenly. 

And Maca suffered them not to move to their 
lands for nine days ; and Mumain $ harps were heard, 
and the bards of Mumain did tell the sweet tales of 
other times enchaiitingly. 

And Maca abided in Teacmor with her children. 

And Maca did enter into Mur Ola mam ; and she 
did bid the Olam and the youths to Teacmor. 

What though the custom of Tainistact forbid that 
a woman should sit on the throne, Eri seemeth not 
to feel oppressed for that Maca is thereon. 

Her ear is ever open to the voice of misfortune, 



OF ERI 365 

and her heart disposed to relieve the distressed and 
destitute. 

And when she had sat on the seat of the king for 
one ring, one moon, and one day, she died. 

And her form \vas borne into Aodmagnmaca, and 
there was her heap raised, nigh unto the heap of Ci- 
ombaot. 

And the children of the land mourned for that 
Maca was no more. 

(a) This is the first instance of a female sitting on a throne in Ert. 



CHAP. III. 

The reign of React ad, a space of ten rings, from 310 

to 300. 

.Now the assembly were on Tobrad to choose Ar- 
dri, and Murcad chief of Almuiu rose, and said, 

" Let Ugoine the king in Gaelen, rule, Ardri? 

And Hearda chief of Ardtaiu rose, and said, 

" Let Reactad king; in Mumain take the throne." 

And none but the princes and nobles of Gaelen 
held up their hand for Ugoine. 

And all the assembly save those held up their hand 
for Reactad, and Reactad was chosen. 

For the princes and nobles of Ullad and Oldan- 
mact remembered the friendship Mumain manifested 
towards Maca. 

And Ugoine sought occasions to humble Reactad, 
but he feared to do according to his desire, because 
of Ullad. 



Eri is in repose therefore. 
And when Ardri had ruled two rings Ugomt 
in the high chamber of Teacmor, and he did say unto 
him, 

" Let Ardri answer, hath Oldanmact paid his 
tribute ?" 

And Reactad answered, " What concern is that of 
thine Ugoine? Ardri that is will exact or forego his 
tribute as he pleaseth, and not take counsel of the 
king of Gaelen. 

" Doth Ugoine feel himself injured, let him answer 
to the voice of the herald, saying, Standeth one on 
Tobrad for justice ?"() 
And Ugoine was put to confusion. 
And when Reactad had ruled for the course of six 
rings, Ugoine sent a messenger unto Eocaid at Aod- 
magnmaca, saying, 

" If Oldanmact is suffered to go free of tribute 
longer, the thing will grow tip into a custom ; Ardri 
will lack. Let Ulldd see to the sprouting friendship 
of Iber for Oldanmact, lest it blossom and bear bit- 
ter fruit to the taste of the race of Er. 

" Reactad thinketh he alone is king in Eri'' 
And Eocaid sent words by the hand of the riies- 
senger of Ugoine, " Ullad is well pleased at the* lov^ 
feet ween Iber and Oldanmact ; the frien'cfsli'ip of the 
Danan hath been delicrbus to the children of Er, 
they fear not that it will fail to ripen, or tfill t&rat, 
60 long as they shall nourish it." 

Now it was told through Eri that Ugoine did cfall 
out the hunters to the chase, arid they did move' With 
the chiefs tfver the hills and through the plains of 
Gaelen; the hatred of Ugoine towards Reacttid 



mi. 

i did dvvell ili Muindin, 
the children of the land did love him in therr very 
hearth, for Reactad wag brave and generous, no man 
did he ever oppress. 

And when Reactad had ruled ten rings, he did 
journey to Tencmor, and many of the princes and 
nobles, a gallant train, and of the Gaol, accompanied 
the king. 

And bards and minstrels were with the men, for 
they said, " We will pass away the time of absence 
from sprightly Mumain in music and the song, and 
tales." 

And when words came to the ear of Ugoine that 
Reactad was forth of Mumain, and abiding in Teac- 
mor, with but a slender train, he assembled the war- 
riors of Gaelen, and hasted to Teacmor. 

And whilst the men of Mumain were dancing on 
Tobrad, they espied a multitude moving towards 
them. 

And it was told to lleaclad, and he said, " Let the 
heralds assemble the warriors." 

And tt eac tad said, " This is none other than Ugo- 
inef and the men of Mumain moved in haste towards 
the crowd. 

And Reactad bad the heralds say, in the hearing 
of Ugoine, 

' Whither speed so many hounds? Where is the 
chase? Is Ugoine king of Gaelen in the midst? Let 
film show his face to the eye of Reactad" 

But Ug&tne came not forth. 

And the host ofGaelen did pour upon the men oi 
fflumain, and they did hem them in on every side ; 
the men of Mumain fought valiantly, but all availed 



368 CHRONICLES 

not, they were too few, howbeit they made a great 
slaughter ere they were overpowered. 

And Reactad was slain ; of all his little host few 
did escape the sword. 

And when no danger was, Ugoine strode before the 
host to Teacmor, and entered into the house of the 
king. 

() The meaning of this passage is, that when the herald should 
say aloud, at the closing of the doors of Teacmor ; " Standeth any 
one on Tobrad for justice ?" Ugoine should then answer, and make 
his accusation. 



CHAP. IV. 

The reign of Ugoine Mor, king in Gaelen, Erimionn, 
a space of one score and ten rings, from 300 to 270. 

Now messengers went though the land, saying, " Let 
the kings, princes, and nobles assemble on Tobrad 
out of hand, to say who shall sit on the throne of 



And Aongus the son of Reactad, who had been 
chosen king in Mumain, came to the tents of Eocaid 
king of Ullad, and he said unto him, " If Eocaid 
would shake off his melancholy, and rule over Eri?" 

But Eocaid said, " Nay; I will abide in Aodmagn- 
maca, nor should my steps have hither brought me, 
save in obedience to the words on the roll of the 
laws." 

And Aongus said, " Must false Ugoine sit on the 
throne?" 



OF ERI. 369 

And Eocaid said, " He will, if Aongus Cannot 
prevent." 

Now Aongus could not stop the foot of Ugoine, so 
many of the princes of Iber fell with Reactad. (a) 

And when the assembly were together, Ugoine the 
son of Eocaid was chosen. 

And he went forth with the princes and nobles 
of Gaelen only to Liafail, and Ard Cruimtear placed 
the asion on his head, and Morda chief of Laois laid 
the mantle on his shoulders. 

Aongus, nor one of Mumain sat at the boards of 
Ugoine; they abided but four days in their tents on 
Tobrad, and then returned to their own land. 

And Eocaids&id unto Cas prince of Er, " Do thou 
and the princes and nobles of Uttad as the custom,(&) 
I will tarry at Mur Olamain of Teacmor till the writ- 
ings shall be read ; and the same words spake he 
unto Ceuct the chief, and unto the nobles of Oldan- 
mact. 

And when nine days passed, and the assembly 
were called to the high chamber, 

Ugoine rose, and said, 

" The king and princes and nobles of Mumain have 
taken their departure. 

" The king of Ullad hath shut himself up in Mur 
Olamain of Teacmor, peradventure he thinketh the 
days pass heavily till he shall return to Ullad. 

"Therefore what if the writings be read?'* 

And they were read. 

And on the third day, Eocaid, and all of Ullad, 
Ceuct, and all of Oldanmact, moved to the land of 
their dwellings. 

VOL. II. 2B 



370 CHRONICLES 

And when none but those of Gaelen remained, 

The doors of the high chamber were opened, and 
they did take their seats. 

And Morda chief of Laois rose, and said, 

" The king and nobles of Mumain regard not-lZrt, 
when one of Iber hath sat on the throne, he hath 
abided in Mumain leaving Tobrad desolate. 

" As to the race of Er, Vllad is their care. Hath 
not Aodtnagnmaca been raised up, exceeding this 
Teacmor, that the king may dwell therein continually. 

" And thus Eri is abandoned to the charge of the 
sons of the first Erimionn. 

" The words of Eocaid Olam Fodla, of the custom 
of Tuinistact, are 

" Let him that sitteth on the throne be no longer 
Called Erimionn, let him be Ardri: and our fathers 
of that day did consent thereunto. Eocaid had his 
reasons therefor, he thought to keep the throne of 
Eri for the race of Et\ 

" Is not he that ruleth Erimionn? 

" Therefore what if the king be called for times to 
come - ERIMIONN?" 

And all shouted and cried "Yea;" and they pre- 
sented their right hands to Ugoine> calling him Eri- 



Now as Eocaid, and the princes and nobles of 
Ullad- were moving towards Aodmagnmaca, messen- 
gers in haste met them on the way, and they told 



unto the king, 



A mighty host from live waters of Febail stand on 
the land. 

And Eocaid said, " Let the chiefs haste to their 



OF ERI. 371 

Tanaisteas (c) to gather together the warriors, and 
meet the king at the tents of Ratbot" 

And it was so. 

And the king and the warriors of Ullad moved to- 
wards Febail; and they beheld the strangers stand- 
ing nigh unto their ships which floated on the wa- 
ters ; huge were their limbs, terrible their aspect, 
frightful to look upon: round their necks was '.tied 
the thong of their swords, and in their right hancts 
they bore a long spear. 

And when the king drew nigh unto them, Eocaid 
inquired whence they came, and why ; but they un- 
derstood not the words of the king, howbeit a word 
now, and a word then, spoken by one and the other, 
was understood ; all that could be known was, that 
they came from beneath the fingers of Baal, there 
was neither aged man nor lad amongst them, nor one 
woman ; no provision had they left ; and they did 
call themselves men of Feytar, and Cruiton is their 
chief. 

Aod the king bad provisions to be prepared for 
them, 

And there were one score chiefs and Cruitenmore- 
over, and one thousand six hundred and four score 
and five of the Gaol. 

And of the Danan some were sent for, perad ven- 
ture they may know the speech of the strangers. 
They did not know one word thereof. 

And when they did abide on the land for twice 
nine days, 

And all that their hearts could desire was given 
unto them, the king had it m'a'de known unto them 
that they may dwell in the land, 

2 B 2 



372 CHRONICLES 

But they would not ; they signified that the land 
was full. 

And Eocaid bad that store of provision be col- 
lected for them, and in nine other days they took 
their departure, and moved towards the sun's rising. 

And Eocaid, and the princes and nobles did give 
the chiefs the hand of friendship. 

Now words came to the ear of Ugoine of what had 
happed, and he sent a messenger unto Aodmagn- 
maca, saying, 

" How cometh it to pass that the king of Ullad 
taketh on him the office of Erimionn; what men are 
they whom he hath cherished, and sent away as 
pleased him ?" 

And Eocaid answered, 

" Strangers, desolate and almost famished, came 
from the waters of the vast deep, the men of Ullad 
did spread food before them : they came, and tarried, 
and went away in peace. 

" It needed not to trouble Eri with such things \ 
the children of Ullad know how to perform the duty 
of hospitality, and how to maintain their land with- 
out, asking counsel of such like." 

Now the messengers had gone through Eri to call 
the kings, princes, and nobles, chiefs of the Olaw, 
and heads of the people to the high chamber of Te- 
acmor on Tobrad; 

And Eocaid was making preparation to go to the 
assembly, when words were brought unto him that 
the chief, and nine of the nobles of Feotar abided in 
the tents of the chief of Ardtain, and that their de- , 
sire was to speak with the Icing of Ullad. 

And Eocaid sent letters by the hands of the mes- 



OF ERI. 373 

senger unto Aoda, saying, " Come thou hither, and 
let the chiefs of Feotar be with thee." 

And Aoda chief ofArdtain, and the chiefs of Feo- 
tar came to Aodmagnmaca with him. 

And they abided there, and what time Eocaid 
moved towards Tobrad they bare him company, and 
they dwelt in the tents of the king of Ullad on To- 
brad. 

And when the assembly were together, the king 
of Ullad rose, and said, 

" Eocaid hath words for En when the doors of 
Teacmor shall next be opened." 

And when the feasts were ended, and the assembly 
were together in the high chamber, 

Eocaid king of Ullad rose, and said, 

" There abideth now in the tents of Ullad on To- 
brad, the chief, and nine of the nobles of Feotar of 
the Gaol, who entered into Ullad by the waters of 
Febail twelve moons now passed, and thence did 
move to the land towards the sun's rising, whereon 
they now do dwell. 

" But ere they did depart, the children of Ullad 
did give unto them the hand of friendship, and the 
word of promise to do nought of evil to them ward. 

" Hither now have the chiefs come to take of dam- 
sels of our land, and to make with us a covenant Oi 
peace for times to come. 

" What though they understand not our speech 
enough to know all of our words, their eyes could 
look upon our countenances whilst our tongues did 
utter the name of Feotar, arid tell their hearts our 
minds were full of love towards them. 



374 



CHRONICLES 



" What if the chiefs did enter into the high cham- 
ber, and witness the manner of our talk?" 
. And it was so. 

And the chiefs of Feotar were seated with the 
princes of Ullad. 

And the assembly held talk, 

. And it was thought good that damsels of En 
should be joined unto the chiefs, and unto the Gaat 
of Feotar, the damsels willing thereunto. 

And the doors of the high chamber were closed, 
qnd of the nobles such as were consenting that their 
daughters should join themselves unto the strangers 
did return to their tents. 

And matrons and damsels from the nations of ' Eri 
of the nobles and of the Gaol were on Tobrad. 

And Eocaid did bring Ugoine and Aongus to- 
gether. 

And the harpers of Mumain were on Tobrad; but 
the Feotar seemed not to take delight in the sound 
of their voice. 

And joy and mirth, and song and dance, and mu- 
sic and sports followed day fifter day, the like unto 
which hath not been seen in 'Eri. 

All Eri abided on Tobrad for three full moons; 
and when the strangers were about to take their de- 
parture, the doors of the high chamber were opened, 
and the assembly of Eri and the chiefs of Feotar 
assembled therein. 

And the men had been taught of the speech of 
Gae1len<r enough to make a covenant. 
And Er'unionn rose, and said, 
" If damsels of Eri go unto the land of Cruithen, 
and abide thereon with the chiefs, and with the Gaal 



OF ERI. 375 

of that land, will the chiefs make covenant that the 
sons of the daughters of the chief shall 'rule for 
ever ?'' 

And they were consenting: thereunto. 

And all came forth ofTeacmor, and the Feotar had 
brought of the earth of the land of Cruilhen, and 
they did form a circle thereof on Tobrad, and they 
did set their feet thereon, and they did hold their 
spears in their left hands, the points on the ground, 
and they raised up their right hands, and they did 
swear by the earth that they would observe the co- 
venant for ever. 

And the words were set down on the book of the 
chronicles of En. 

And when they took their departure, 

Aine the daughter of the chief of Coriat did ac- 
, company the chief, 

And Lara daughter of the chief of Oirmion, 

Eilead daughter of the chief of Dean, 
' Miana daughter of the chief ofArdtain, 

Tacara daughter of the chief of Aoimag, 

Una daughter of the chief of Maginis, 

Sotal daughter of the chief of Lame, 

Etne (laughter of the chief of Cumar, 

Jlana daughter of the chief of -Maglein, 

And Mamna daughter of the chief of Almuin. 

These damsels did accompany the chiefs. 

And nine maidens of the Gaal went with each of 
the damsels ; and they did move to the extremity of 
the land of Ardiain, and a great multitude with 
them. 

And the chief of Ardtain did give unto the chief 
the hand of promise, thai if the children of Crmthen 



#76 CHRONICLES 

did cherish the daughters of Eri, the land should be 
open unto them to take of the damsels of the land in 
times to come. 

And they took their departure in sight of the chil- 
dren of the land, their eyes fixed on Eri tenderly. 

Eri is in peace. 

What though Eocaid did shun the company of 
men, and did abide within Aodmagnmaca, he is 
stored with wisdom, and he doth go unto Teacmor, 
and he hath called together the assembly of Ullad 
to Aodmagnmaca in due season. 

And now that he had ruled in Ullad sixteen rings, 
and the assembly were together, Eocaid said, " It is 
my desire that Mur Olamain should be builded nigh 
unto Aodmagnmaca ; that provision be made for the 
Olam and for the youth, if the princes of Er are con- 
senting thereunto, in the hearing of the assembly, 
that the portions be taken from Ard Scealact for 
ever." (d) 

And all the princes rose, and said, " So be it." 

And when two rings were completed, the house 
was builded, and the Olam sat therein. 

And when Eocaid had ruled eighteen rings, 
Meleige died, and Dod was chosen Ard Olam of 
Ullad. 

And as I Dod did sit with the king, and I did speak 
unto him concerning the circuit of Ard Olam to the 
schools of Ullad, the king looked dejectedly, and he 
said unto me, " I had thought to have entered into 
all the schools of Ullad ere I ceased : it may not be, 
my spirit sinketh within me." 

And Eocaid abided in Aodmagnmaca, and Dod 
did take his departure, and what time he did return 



OF ERI. 377 

the king was very weak, and he wasted more and 
more every day until he ceased, having ruled one 
score rings complete. 

And his heap was raised in Cluaneac of Dim So- 
baircc, nigh unto the heap of Airgeadmair, according 
to the bidding of the king. 

And Ullad mourned for Eocaid. 

He was full of the spirit of Eocaid Olam Fodla, 
though his fire blazed not forth. 

And Cas the son of Ciombaot and Maca was cho- 
sen king of Ullad, and he is called Ceanmiamagn. (e) 

Now that Eocaid had ceased, the mind of Ugoine 
began to disclose itself; words were spread abroad 
that he designed to call the assembly of Eri to the 
mount of Gaelen on Magnas. 

Cas was young, and had given himself to sports, 
and Aongus of Iber had taken Melisa the daughter 
of Erimionn, and moved in all his ways as Ugoine 
did direct. 

And Cas being flung from his horse on largael, 
whither he went to hunt, 

And Connor the brother of Cas being chosen, what 
though young, famed for wisdom through Eri, ru- 
mours of the thoughts of Erimionn died away. 

Howbeit, when Ugoine had ruled for the course 
of thirteen rings, and the messengers went through 
Eri with letters, the words thereof were, " Let the 
assembly of Eri come together on the mount of Ga- 
elet 1 , to meet Erimionn." (f) 

And when the assembly did come together, Ugoine 
had a booth set up, and the tents were raised 
about on their quarters. 

And when the king, and princes, and nobles, and 



375 CHRONICLES 

of the deputies of the Gaol did enter into the booth, 
the chief of Almuin rose, and said, 

" Murcad hath words for the assembly, touching 
Erimionn" 

And all Ullad stood up like unto a flock of storks ; 
their eyes turned on this and that and every side. 
And Erimionn rose, and talked of Eri, but little 
notice was taken of his words. 

When Connor king of Ullad rose, and said, 
" My eye doth see here on the mount of Gaelen 
the throne, and asion, and mantle, of the king ; my 
ear hath heard that Liafail abideth hereabout. That 
the table of the high chamber of Teacmor, the roll of 
the laws, and the book of the chronicles of the land 
have been forgotten, 1 do marvel at. 

" Connor will not incline his ear to words spoken 
of Eri, till the writings shall be placed in the midst 
of the assembly. 

** Have the laws ceased with the name of Ardri? 
Connor will hence to Ullad, till he shall hear that 
the writings are in the view of the assembly of Eri." 
And Connor went forth, and all of Ullad and of 
Oldanmact, and all the Olam of the assembly, and 
the judges of Ullad followed his steps. 

And Connor besought the Olam of Gaelen and of 
Mumain to tarry. And he moved towards Aod- 
magumaca. 

And after they had gone, Ugoinc called together 
those of Mumain and of Gaelen; and Murcad chief 
of Alwuin rose, and said, 

" What if one of the race of the first Erimionn 
rule Erimionn for ever r" 
AIM! it was so. 



OF ERI. 

And when these things were told unto Connor, he 
said, 

*' If the children of the race come together at set 
times, and that 'the peace of Eri be preserved, it is 
of little moment who sitteth on the throne of Eri, or 
by what name the king be called." 

And after a while Connor sent a messenger unto 
Ugoine with letters, And these are the words 
thereof: 

" What time the assembly shall be together for the 
time that cometh, shall not the writings be on the 
tables in the midst, 'twere well Erimionn had words 
ready to tell ; why not." 

Now Ugoine did move sideways, and insidiously; 
and Mumain was as Gaelen in all things that were 
hurtful, the princes and nobles were taking damsels 
from either lands. 

And when Ugoine had ruled seventeen rings, and 
the assembly were on Magnas, and the writings were 
on the tables in the midst, 

Erimionn rose, and said, 

" The land of Erimionn round about Teacmor 
on Tobrad was of Gaelen, and yielded by Don for 
Ardri in the days of Eocaid of the race of Er; since 
which time it hath happed that Ardri had no land 
besides, and they sufficed not : what availeth the 
tribute from Oidanmact ? 

" Erimionn hath gotten but his own, nor could 
aught be added save from Gaelen. 

" Therefore, what if Cios were cessed on the na- 
tions of Eri for Erimionn during times to come." 

And Connor said, " When Erimionn hath no other 
seat." 



380 CHRONICLES 

And Erimionn said, " Better not at all, than that 
the custom were changeable." 

And when Connor heard the voices of the king 
and princes of Mumain, he held his peace. 

And it was so. 

And the Cios is one for every three hundred of 
the cattle of four rings, each ring that the assem- 
bly of Eri sitteth for times to come to be of Taints- 
tact. 

Now Ugoine had ruled one score rings lacking 
one; and he did send Laogaire his son, with many 
nobles, and of the Gaal, to the land of Cruithen: 
and he did take Aine the daughter of the chief of 
the Gaol of Feotar, and of Aine the maid of Co- 
riat. 

And when the assembly were on the mount of 
Magnas, 

Erimionn rose, and said, 

" Hath the king of Ullad been the first to stop 
the foot of the steward of the king, as he moved to 
collect the Cios of the land ? Loud would have been 
the sound of the voice of Connor against another so 
transgressing." \ 

And Connor rose, and said, 

" The cattle are for provision for those who shall 
abide round the assembly of Eri. Let Erimionn 
make known at what time they shall be sent, and 
the just number shall be driven hither. My mind 
instructeth me to fear, if men of Gaelen were per- 
mitted to enter Ullad, they would, at time not far 
distant, peradventure, come in greater numbers, and 
with weapons not those of the herdsman, insulting 
the children of the land. 



OF ERI. 381 

" In few words, the heads of the people will send 
the Cios of Ullad." 

And Erimionn was silent. 

And Ugoine did set twelve men to collect the Cios 
of Mumain, and the like number to collect the Cios 
of Gaelen; and one did he set over them, even Gial- 
cad his first-born. 

And when Ugoine had ruled one score and two 
rings, Aongus king in Mumain died, and Noid his 
brother was chosen. 

And when Connor had ruled twelve rings, Dod 
died, and Leiban was chosen Ard Olam of Ullad. 

Connor walketh in the way of his race, he hath 
not been surpassed by one of the sons of Er. 

When Connor had ruled thirteen rings, the chiefs 
of Ardtain, and of Maginis, and of Larne, did pass 
over the waters of the sea to Cruithens land ; and 
they abided for a while with their kindred, and they 
were well pleased. 

Arid Roigne the son of Erimionn was in their com- 
pany : he did pass times at Aodmagnmaca with Con- 
nor, and Connor taketh delight in Roigne; he hath 
more wisdom than any of the race of JErimionn since 
the days of Eteerial. 

He is skilled in sweet verses of the bards ; he hath 
set down all the words of the laws of all the na- 
tions of JEW, and the customs of the Danan, yea, and 
of Firgneat; and he hath put together all the rules 
of the custom of Tainistact. 

Now Ugoine had ruled one score and five rings. 
And when the assembly were together, he said, 
" The Gaol increase the Gaol of Feotar are be- 
fore us; 'twere well the assembly, met three rings 



CHKONICLES 

and three rings, though but to hear the sound of 
each other's voice." 

And it was so. 

Now as Connor had foreseen and did foresay, 
Giaicad did enter Mumain, and did run through 
Gaelen, and did take off from the pastures cattle, as 
the hunter driveth the deer, yea, as the victor bear- 
eth off the spoil. 

And when words of the doings of Giaicad reached 
to the ear of Ugoine, and he did call his son unto 
him and speak to him thereof, Giaicad did pour false- 
hood into the ear of his father. 

But after a time, Ugoine did come to know that 
Giaicad and Bacad the brother of Erimionn, did 
never cease to drive away of the cattle of the Gaal 
to the tents of these twain ; and that it was that 
made Ugoine wrathful; for it was said in Mumain 
and in Gaelen, that he would not have stopped the 
course of them, had the cattle been driven to the 
lands of the king. 

And Ugoine sent messengers unto Bacad, and unto 
Giaicad, that they should stand before him. 

And Erimionn reproved Bacad, and he did say 
unto him, " It is well for Eri thou canst never 



And Bacad drew forth a sharp and pointed sword, 
and he did ,bury the blade thereof in the bowels 
of the king; and lie did escape in haste. 

A little while till Laogaire the son of Ugoine ; did 
enter into the chamber where his father, \et in life, 
did -lay; and he did tell all that had happed; and 
the words were but ended when Ugoine breathed 
for the last time. 



OF ERI. 383 

And Gialcad hasted to the tents of the king on 
Magnus : 

But Laogaire did pursue after Bacad ; and ere 
l.is father was in ihe coldness of death, he did avenge 
his father's blood. 

Thus fell Ugoine,Kher he had ruled Erimionnfor 
the space of one score rings and ten. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER IV. 

() The princes always suffered more than any other of the war- 
riors as the diminution of their number often decided elections. 

(/>) The meaning of Eocaid is that he would not partake of the 
feast with Ugoinc, though he recommended it to Cas, as it was a 
custom. 

(c) Tuinisteas is a seigniory. 

(af) The reason that the princes of Er should consent to any re- 
gulation as to Ard Scculact \vas, because it was the portion of a 
priuce. 

(e) Ceunuiaman means, the head of the race of <lfagn, alluding 
to his grandmother, the daughter of Magn, chief of Oldannittct. 

(/) The motive of Ugoinc for transit rring the assembly from 
Tobrad to Magnus* was to commence the obliteration of Teacmor, 
the work of Eoctid Olain Fodla, from the memory of the people 
to reclaim the portion of Ardri which had belonged to Gae/cn 
and to have the states meet in a more central part of his own pro- 
per kingdom for the future. He now made an addition to the 
revenue of the king, no longer Ardri, but Eiwiionn, which was to 
be confined to his own race ; and so vain is man, he fancied that 
these decrees would be perpetual. 

(g) Bacad, being lame, could not rule. 

This relation of the coming of the Gaal of Feotar to En", and 
their establishment in the northern extremity of brituin> marks the 
era of their migration, and elucidates the reason of tne succession 
by the males accord njf to the female line in Caledonia. 

Some have imagined, and recorded a*. fact, that the Gaal of Feo- 
tar settled in Britain in the time of the first Enmionn, 1000 year* 



384 CHRONICLES 

before Christ; whereas, the truth is, Ugoine, not Jolar, was the Eri- 
mionn, which title he now re-assumed. The origin and migration 
of this tribe has been explained in the dissertation prefixed to this 
work. 



CHAP. V. 

The reign of Laogaire, a space of sixteen rings, from 
270 to 254. 

UGOINE being slain by Bacad his brother, Gial- 
cad the first born of Ugoine had hasted to the tents 
of ErimioHU, and did remove all things found 
therein. 

And he did send forth messengers to call the 
princes and nobles to the mount, to say who was to 
sit on the throne of Gaelen. 

Now the minds of many were full of suspicion 
against Gialcad, that he was present when his fa- 
ther was slain ; and it was of a truth known unto 
them, that he took no pains to avenge his death. 

Therefore did they choose Laogaire; for that they 
were pleased because of his pursuit after Bacad, yea, 
and slaying him. 

And when the assembly of JEri came together, 
Laogaire was also chosen Erimionn by those of 
Mumain and of Gaelen ; neither the king, princes, 
nor nobles of Ullad, nor the chief nor nobles of Ol- 
danmact were present. 

The fury of Gialcad raged for a season ; howbeit, 
as he did continue to be over those who cessed the 



OF ERI* 385 

rather than Laogaire, his eye did seem to look on 
his brother with affection. 

Nevertheless Roigne did fear for Laogaire his 
brother, for he loved him ; and he spake unto him, 
and said, " Let me, I pray thee, speak unto Connor 
king in Ullad, for that Noid is as one of the princes 
of Gaelen, and Aine, the partner of the secret thoughts 
of Laogaire, is the daughter of the chief of the Gaol 
of Cruithens land : 

" And as Ullad hath Oldanmact clasped in friend- 
ship, what if Ullad and Gaelen rule in Eri ? So the 
king of Ullad shall abide in Aodmagnmaca, and the 
king of Gaelen shall dwell on Magnas for times to 
come, and enter into a covenant." 

And Laogaire answered, " Let Roigne do as 
seemeth fit unto him." 

And unto Connor did Roigne go; and he did speak 
the words in Connors ear. 

And Connor said unto Roigne, 

" When the sons of Golam did hither come, and 
Cier was covered over in the waters of the vast sea, 
and the lad Er his son was yet in youth, lolar the 
great father of Laogaire and of thee, did conspire 
with Blath, called Amergein the priest, that with his 
father lost he should also lose his portion of the 
land. 

" But Marcac the father of the race of Noid, did 
take by the hand the boy Er, and o'er his head lie 
threw his shield ; and thus, and by the love of the 
nobles, yea, and of Gaal, was rny father Er seated 
within this land, and here hath his heap been raised, 
and thence is his portion called the land of Ullad. 

11 And now doth Laogaire conspire with his bro- 

VOL. II. 2 C 



386 CHRONICLES 

ther Roigne to spoil my brother Noid of his kingdom 
in like sort. 

" Return thou, Roigne, unto Gaelen, and say to 
Laogaire, 

" Thus said Connor, 

" Ullad is the portion of the sons of Er from the 
beginning ; that have his sons maintained, no more 
have they desired: the king of Ullad now that is, 
will not depart from the ways of his race, nor from 
the words on the roll of the laws of Eri. n 

And the words of Connor did give pain to the 
soul of Roigne, and he said unto him, " If Connor 
would but think of the love Roigne doth bear for 
Laogaire, and the fear he hath of Gialcad, perad- 
venture he would pardon him for his words." 

And Connor did take him by the hand, and he 
said unto him, " Let Roigne be comforted Connor 
will not think upon the words again. Go, Roigne 9 
and tell the words of Connor into thy brother's ear, 
and hither speed again and bide; perhaps the friend- 
ship of us twain may preserve peace between thy 
brethren, though friendship be far distant." 
And Roigne did as the king of Ullad said unto him. 
Now Laogaire did permit Gialcad to rule in every 
thing ; and Gialcad did carry himself with rigour 
through Gaelen and through Mumain, what though 
the revenue of Erimionn was said to be Cios, (a) he 
did exact the same as Cobac. 

And Roigne did journey to the tents of Gialcad 
to commune with him. 

r And Gialcad's anger rose, and he would have 
slain his brother; but Roigne was stronger than 
him ; Gialcad was gaunt, and had a weakly frame. 



OF ERI 387 

And Roigne returned to Aodmagnmaca, and 
dwelt with Connor: he surpassed all the children 
of Gaelen in wisdom ; therefore was it said, that 
Lerida the mother of Roigne was beloved of Ros 
prince of Er ; and she did doat on Ros, loathing 
Ugoine ; but of this Leiben knoweth not. 

Ullad is in peace and happiness, Ullad and Oldan- 
mact are as one. 

Now Connor hath made additions to Aodmagnmaca 
and to Mur Olamain thereof, the house of Eocaid 
was not sufficient to contain the scholars that crowd- 
ed thereto. 

Leiben gave not enough repose unto himself; he 
did labour in the schools continually, now in one, 
now in another, his strength was not equal to the 
weight he laid on it : and what time Connor had ruled 
one score and six rings, Leiben died ; and he was 
lamented by all the children of the land, and by 
none more than by Roigne the son of Ugoine. 

And Toil was chosen Ard Olatn of Ullad in the 
place of Leiben. 

And when Erimionn had sat nine rings, Noid 
king in Mumain died, having sat after the same tiian- 
ner as Latigetire for the course of seventeen rings, 
and Lugad his son was chosen king in Mumain. 

And Gialcad did lay hold on his mind, and he 
moved as he did direct in all his ways. 

Still Connor lived, and Gialcad did tremble through 
fear of him. 

But Connor having died^ having ruled for the cir- 
cuit of one score and ten rings, 

And Fiacnac the son of Cas, son bfCiombaot, be- 
ing chosen king in Ullad, 

2c2 



388 CHRONICLES 

The spirit of Gialcad began to be manifested : and 
when the assembly of Eri were together what time 
Fiacna had ruled one ring, the eye and hand of 
Gialcad did move as he did think would be pleasing 
unto Fiacna, till he did say unto him after a while, 

" Hath Fiacna never thought upon the danger to 
Eri from Oilliol the son of Aine of tlie Feotar? Is 
it fitting that Laogaire, who mopeth as the owl, 
should rule the land ? Will not Fiacna take the 
throne ?" 

And Fiacna said, " Nay." 

And the king of Ullad took his departure for 
Aodmagnmaca ; and he did tell unto Roigne the 
words of Gialcad, and Roigne did speed to Laogaire 
to speak them in his ear. 

And Roigne did return to Aodmagnmaca, and he 
told unto Fiacna, that Laogaire said, he should re- 
joice to be eased of the weight. 

And when the assembly of Ullad were together 
after these things had happed, and the ear of Fiacna, 
heard not the words touching them read, which he 
did tell unto Toil to have set down, 

The king rose, and said, 

" My ears have not heard aught of what I bad to 
Toil to set down on the chronicles of the words of 
Gialcad and of Fiacna? 

And Toil was in confusion, and his memory seem 
ed to have departed from him ; and from that mo 
ment he became as a child. 

And Seagar was chosen Ard Olam of Ullad in 
his stead. 

And the words have been set down in their due 
place. 



OF ERI. 

Now Gialcad spread evil reports of Laogaire ; 
and it was whispered about from the tongue of Gial- 
cad, that his father had not been slain by Bacad, 
and that Laogaire had shed the blood of the brother 
of his father to seize on the throne ; and moreover, 
that fear of Laogaire had caused Gialcad to fly at 
that time to the tents of his father. 

Moreover, that Laogaire had many a time and 
oft, besought Gialcad to pardon his transgressions, 
and rule the land, whilst he desired nought but the 
name of king. 

Whilst these words were passing thiough the 
land, so great was the favour, or the fear, of the king 
towards Gialcad, it seemed as though Gialcad was 
Erimionn. 

And when Laogaire had sat in the place of the 
king sixteen rings, words came unto him, " Gialcad 
thy brother lieth on the bed of sickness, his eye doth 
long to look on Laogaire before he die." 

And Laogaire went to the dwelling of Gialcad to 
comfort him, and some few accompanied him. 

And Gialcad said unto Laogaire, as he was quik 
ting the chamber, " Why hath iny brother brought 
this train with him ? If he and Oilliol his son would 
tarry with me for a time, many are the words my 
lips have to disclose unto both." 

And Laogaire listened to the voice of his brother, 
and he did send away those who had come in his 
company ; and Laogaire and Oilliol his son abided 
in the tents of Gialcad, and Dub chief of Remionn, 
and his son, ministered unto them. 

And on the next day, ere Laogaire and Oilliol 



CHRONICLES 

his son did go to rest, they went into the chamber 
of Gialcad. 

And as Laogaire did sit on the bed of Gialcad, 
and Oilliol stood beside, Dub and his son entered 
into the chamber, and Gialcad rose from the bed on 
which he lay, and he did plunge his knife into the 
breast of Laogaire, and Dub and his son did slay 
Oilliol. 

And Dub and his son and Gialcad did spread 
the rumour through Eri, that Laogaire and Oilliol 
his son did attempt the life of Gialcad, as he lay on 
the bed of sickness, and had slain him, but for Dub 
and Meorcean his son. 

Thus perished Laogaire, having sat on the seat of 
the king for the course of sixteen rings. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER v. 

Gialcad was the eldest son otUgoine; the princes and nobles of 
Gaden were so pleased with the filial duty of Laogaire, his second son, 
that they elected him king of Gaelen ; and Connor, having no inten- 
tion of the throne of Eri, Laogaire was chosen Erimionn. He had 
taken Ainc the daughter of Cruithen, chief of the Feotar, by Aine 
the daughter of the chief of Coriat in Eri. 

Roigne was brother to Laogaire and Giaicad, and being a wise 
and prudent man, and wishing to avert the evils Eri was threatened 
with by the mal-practices of his own family, sought to divide the 
island into two kingdoms, of Ullad with Oldanmact, and of Gaelen 
with Mumaiih To this the fidelity of Connor permitted him not to 
accede. 

(a) Cios means a return, as rent, or any equivalent for something 
granted. Cobac means tribute, or something exacted by force. 



OF ERI. 301 



CHAP. VI. 

The reign o/* Gialcad the son o/*Ugoine, a space of 
seventeen rings, from 254 to 237 

Now the messengers went forth through Eri, to 
call the assembly together to choose Erimionn. 

And Gialcad, placed on the seat of the king in 
Gaelen afore, was chosen Erimionn by the unsteady 
voices of the princes and nobles of Gaelen and of 
Mumain. 

And JDuac the son of Oilliol the son of Laogaire, 
a child of two rings, was conveyed away out of the 
reach of Gialcad to the dwelling of Fearmor chief of 
Coriat, the son of Morla, the father of Aine, whom 
Cruithen chief of Feotar had taken, Aine the mother 
of Aine whom Laogaire had brought from the land 
of Cruithen, the mother of Oilliol the father of the 
child. 

And Gialcad did make inquiry after the infant, 
and words were told unto him for very truth, that 
he was dumb ; and Alia, the mother of the children 
of Fearmor, did call him Maon, (a) and so was fye 
called by all. 

And Alia had a child born unto her the same day 
that Maon was brought to the tents of Fearmor, and 
she was called Moriat, and she and Maon were rear- 
ed up together. 

And Gialcad ceased to seek after the child. 

Now all the tales told from time to time of Ugoine 
and Laogaire, and of Gialcad, were framed together, 
and how Gialcad spoke of wounds he had received 



392 CHRONICLES 

from Oilliol the son of Laogaire ere he did raise his 
hand to strike, but no one saw them ; and words 
were asked, now of one of the physicians, now of 
another, if he it was who dressed the wounds : but all 
said, nay. 

And all these things did come to Fiacnac's ear; 
but he said, 

" Save Roigne, I have seldom known one better 
than another of lolars race. I will do nought be- 
tween them." 

Now Mumain lay beneath the foot of Gialcad, the 
prince of Ib Lugad had taken a daughter of Eri- 
mionn. 

Ullad dwelt in peace, nought disturbed her repose 
all the days of sixteen rings that Fiacnac ruled ; then 
did he die. 

And Daire the son of Fiacnac was chosen king in 
Ullad in the place of his father. 

And when Daire had ruled one ring, what time 
Gialcad had soiled the throne of Eri for the course 
of thirteen rings, 

The child Maon had grown unto a lad, and such 
a lad, the whispers in his praise had swoln to loud 
breath, till the unwelcome sound did reach to Gial- 
car/'s ear. 

And now on a sudden Maon no more was seen 
on Coriat ; and Fearmor did come to Aodmagnmaca, 
and he did tell to Daire, that he did thither come 
e'en from Ardtain, whither he did accompany the 
youth, then on his way to Ner the son of Crui- 
Iken, chief of Cruithens land, for that words had 
come to Fearmor's ears> that Gialcad sought his 
life. 



OF ERI. 393 

' And Fearmor did tell unto Daire of Mumain and 
the manner of the children of that land, 

And how the earth, but little while passed by, 
had sunk as deep, aye, as an arrow goeth from the 
bow, and water rushed in to the hollow of the land, 
and therein lay, and they are called the waters of 
Gurna, within Coriat. (h) 

Little did Fearmor know more than the chase, 
and music, and the song and dance. And the king 
said unto me, 

" Seagar, this man lacketh knowledge ; the very 
little portion that he hath he seemeth to scorn : so 
vehement his passion for strong drink, that devour- 
eth the reason of man." 

And when Fearmor was about to return to Mum 
ain, Daire gave unto him two beautiful horses, lac 
and Easog y and two fine dogs, Sugac and Luc. 

And Fearmor went his way. 

Now when four rings had passed, Fearmor did 
come to Aodmagnmaca, and he did speak unto 
Daire. 

" Maon still with Ner doth dwell ; all tongues 
speak loudly in his praise: what though his form 
doth bide in the land of Cruilhen, his soul doth rest 
on Eri, and doth long till his foot shall feel this 
soil. 

" The eyes of Gaelen and of Mumain do wink in 
expectation of the sight of the brave youth. 

" The chief of Feotar hath given promise of good 
help; what sayeth the king of Ullad? will he not 
use his hand to pull the bloody Easog(c) Cobtac 
from the throne?" 



394 CHRONICLES 

Whereupon Drire said, " Mumain hath raised 
him, let Mumain pull him down ; Ullad will dwell 
in peace." 

And Fearmor said, 

" The king of Ullad will not stop the foot of Feo- 
tar, by young Maon hither led/' 

And Daire said, 

" The Gaal of Ullad and ofCruit/ien be brethren; 
all may move in peace through Ullad." 

And Fearmor passed on towards the extremity 
of the land of Ardtain, waiting the coming of Maon 
and Glas the son of Fearmor, and the youths who 
did bear Maon company from Coriat, and the host 
of Feotar; thither they meant to steer. 

And as Fearmor did stand upon the height to 
overlook the sea, he spied a skiff that near and nearer 
drew, and it did move within the land, and forth did 
come the messengers Fearmor had sent to the young 
Maon, and Craftine the minstrel of Fearmor, who 
hadjourneyed all the way with them. 

And the men did tell unto Fearmor, " Maon and 
thy sons fare well, and hither will they come with all 
the speed they may." 

Now Fearmor being gone, the messengers not yet 
returned to Coriat, of whose going unto the land of 
Cruithen to the young Maon had been told to Mo- 
rial, she could not bear the tent, the hill nor vale, 
the plain nor grove, save where her Maon had used 
to take delight; hither and thither, from spot to 
spot she roamed, her every sense far far away she 
knew not where, with Maon, wheresoever that was, 
and she was all alone ; for though she guarded not the 
secret of her love, in her chaste love for Maon did 



OP ERI. 

Moriat feel pride, still more in Maon's love for her ; her 
state she would disclose to none ; and all the anxi- 
ous, the distracting agonies of love for Maon, were 
consuming fast the beauteous Moriat. 

Now Alia saw with pain, but dare not speak, till 
Moriat did say, " Let me go hence, and for a time 
abide with Ada's sister in the tents ofOir;" and thi- 
ther Moriat did go. 

Little did the change of place avail ; the hopes and 
fears, the doubts and fancy of the maid did with her 
move. 

The chief ofOirmionn was with the hunters on the 
hills, two youths, his sons, were with their mother, 
Aongusa was the favourite friend of Moriat of all 
the maids of Mumains land ; before her now did 
Moriat lay open her full soul ; and whilst the youths, 
and those that followed in the steps of those fair maids, 
did think that Moriat did but go forth the journey 
of a day or so, to meet her father gone now some 
while, the little company did keep due on. with speed 
to all save Moriat, who thought the herb did sprout 
beneath the horse's foot, so much more slowly than 
her fancy did they move. 

And they pursued their course till they did stand 
on Ullad's soil ; and there they came to hear Fear* 
mor did hide at Aodmagnmaca some days gone by; 
thither Moriat and Aongusa, and the two youths did 
speed. 

And Daire did conduct the damsels to the pre- 
sence of the chief of Coriat, and Moriat did look on 
old Crajtine, the minstrel of Fearmor ; no time had 
she to say a word, howbeit his eye did speak unto 
the maid that ft had Maon seen. 



396 CHRONICLES 

And now the boards were spread, all were but 
seated at the feast, when sound of feet, and many a 
voice was heard, the doors did open wide, and war- 
riors entered, in the arms and mantle of JSri some, 
the spear of Feotar and the short cloak did others 
bear. 

Daire and his guests rose from their seats in won 
der at the sight that all did turn towards ; and ere a 
word came forth, the lovely Moriat, in whose mel- 
low eye her every sense had fled, was in the arms of 
Maon her beloved. 

Fearmor embraced his son, tke brave youth Glas, 
and he did take him in his hand to Daire ; and now 
ne did press young Maon to his heart, and he did 
place his hand within the hand of Daire, calling him 
Maon reared on Allans knee. 

The boards were lengthened out, and Daire bad 
all welcome. 

And when all had feasted, the horns went round ; 
but none did know what happed in full, and as Daire 
sought not, none did inquiry make. 

When Daire said, " If Craftine now would let us 
hear the harp's sweet voice ?" 

And Craftine did strike his harp ; those who had 
not heard the sound afore were in amazement. Fear- 
mor was in rapture at the surprise of the children of 
Ullad y and in wonder at the vacant eyes of Crui- 
thens sons. 

When the voice of the harp was silent, the king 
said," My ears have been ravished with the music 
of thy harp, Craftine; of what sweet tale hath it spoke 
now?" 

And Craftine reclined his harp against the wall, 



OF ERI. 397 

and he stood up before the king, and he did open 
his mouth, and he did tell, 

" Cruel were the thoughts of Cobtac, he sighed for 
rnasterdom at any price, even the price of brother's 
blood ; and Laogaire was no more, and Oilliol Aim 
ceased by Cobtacs hand. The form of Duac(c) had 
been laid beneath his little heap, were not Maon 
borne far away. 

" And Maon found a fostering hand in the tent of 
Coriat; the children that Alia bare were not dearer 
to the hearts of Alia and Fearmor than little Maon; 
still they did call him Maon, though sweetly speak 
did he. 

" The boy grew up, and he did think, he said, there- 
fore he thought that he was born of Alia and Fear- 
mor. 

" As his years increased, the love of all increased 
for him. 

" Fearmor had three sons, and one daughter ; and 
Maon had counted rings more by two than Moriat: 
she was born that very day that Maon first did enter 
the dwelling of Fearmor. 

" From the moments he could distinguish aught, 
her little eye did smile on Maon ; as they grew, 
Maon was her playmate, her delight, her transport 
fully told. 

" But as the blossom opened, and felt the check of 
a fond mother's care, lest it may come to fruit too 
soon, Maon was the secret joy of the sidelong look- 
ing eye of Moriat. 

" Thus time did pass, when on a day, disguised in 
a poor and mean attire, there came a chief to Fear- 
mor's tents, he said, 



398 CHRONICLES 

" ' Whiles the words come streaming through my 
lips, danger speedeth hither; brave Fearmor, guard 
well the approach of every unknown foot to Maon, 
Cobtac doth seek his life, he hath heard all ; I tnust 
go hence.' 

" And Fearmor told the words to Alia, and she 
did whisper in the ear of Moriat, 

" ' Maon goeth hence what time Baal on the mor- 
row shall come forth.' 

" Moriat did hide her face upon her mother's breast, 
and in words but half made up, she said, ' Doth 
Maon go whither Moriat may not go too ? Moriat 
doth live but in her Maoris smiles. 1 

" And when Maon heard of what had happed, he 
said, 'Maon dreadeth no danger beneath the roof 
surrounded by the friends of brave Fearmor; shall 
he go hence with fear ? 

" ' If it seemeth good unto Fearmor ', Maon will 
here abide till fulness of time shall give him strength 
to avenge his father's blood.' 

" The spirit of the youth suffered him not to see 
the dangers with which he was beset. 

" And Fearmor said, ' E'en but a little while let 
Maon go from hence ; Cobtac hath of prying eyes 
more than one pair, of bloody hands more than his 
right and left.' 

" Now preparation was made for Maon to depart ; 
and the night was passed in tales of times gone by, 
and interchange of thought as to the times to come. 
" And on the morrow ere that Baal appeared, nine 
youths and one score men of war stood before the en- 
trance ofFearmor's tent; when they did eat and were 
freshed, they were on their horses' backs. 



OP fcRi. 399 

" Some while had passed till Maon could tear him- 
self away from Moriat ; tears did chase tears quickly 
down the visage of the maid, and large and heavy 
drops did fall from the eyes of the fond youth. 

" And Maon pressed the damsel to his heart, and 
sealed the covenant of plighted faith with ardent 
lips upon the moistened cheeks of lovely Moriat. 

" And he did spring upon his horse, nor looked the 
way he moved so long as he could see the tents of 
Coriat. 

"And Maon, and Fearmor, and Glas his son, and 
the eight youths, and one score men of war pursued 
their way until they reached Ardtain, and thence did 
Maon and his train pass over the waters of the sea ; 
and when they came to land they journeyed to the 
dwelling of the chief, and there did Maon dwell, with 
Ner the lovely fine's son, and once the pride of 
Coriat. 

" And as Fearmor did measure back his lonesome 
steps, he came unto the seat of Daire, Ullad's king, 
* Aodmagnmaca, the theme of song, the never-failing 
food for fancy of the bards. 

" And the mighty chief, the son of Er, threw open 
wide the gate to brave Fearmor. 

" In Aodmagnmaca was his every sense feasted with 
new delights, days passed as sunbeams till Fear- 
mor returned to his place. 

" And still his song, and still his tale is of Daire, 
mighty king, and of the glory of his race. 

"And Maon dwelt with Ner. for four long rings, 
when Fearmor came to know that Gialcad might be 
shaken froni the throne. 



400 CHRONICLES 

" And he did send two trusty messengers to Maon 
to speed to Eri, and pluck up Gialcad by the 
roots. 

" And Moriat, when she did hear they were about 
to go away, did watch the time, and she did pour 
into Craf tine's ear her secret thoughts, and she did 
say, 

" * O, Crqftine, listen to the voice of thy unhappy 
Moriat ! Messengers with letters from Fearmor to 
Maon will soon go hence ; if my Crqftine would take 
his little harp and with them go; and when the men 
have told of Eri and Fearmor, his harp would speak 
of love and Moriat, and tell the tales that Maons 
ear did use to dwell on with delight.' 

"And while Craftine did hold his peace till Mo- 
riat should make an end as he did think, the beau- 
teous maid of Alia laid her fair hand On Craftiness 
breast, her eyes full fixed on his, and she did say, 

" 'Had Moriat been thou, Craftine, and that her 
harp could speak as Craftiness harp, and Crqftine 
had hinted but a word, she would have flown ere 
she knew whither, till memory or his voice had called 
her back to hear his errand. 

" ' And thou, Crqftine, dost ponder ere thou speak.' 

" And Craftine said, ' Wrong not Craftine; whither 
the maid of Coriat shall tell Craftine to go, there will 
he go ; whatever she shall hare him do, that will he 
do ; whatever she shall bid him say, that will he 
say.' 

" And ere he went, or did, or said, Moriat did re- 
compense Craftine as though he had journeyed far, 
and laboured hard, so sweet the smile of Moriat. 



OF ER1. .401 

" * Where is Craftine to go? what shall he do ? and 
what to say?' 

" * To the land of Cruithen go/ replied the maid, 
* and tell thy harp^to speak in Maori's ear, and Craf- 
tine s harp will say how sweetly Maon stole the heart 
of Mortal, and as he bore it off, how the fond youth 
did leave his own with Moriat, a rich exchange. Let 
the sweet warbler sing the pain the heart within the 
bosom of the maid doth feel, in absence from his 
mate, that sighs in Maons breast. 

" O let thy harp tell all. 

" ' Nay, did it tell all I have to say, the messengers 
would go, and hither come again, ere I had said a 
thousandth part of all I have to say ; then in few 
words, 

" ' Let Craf tine's harp speak in the hearing of my 
Maoris ear the words he used to say, as Maon sat 
beneath the great oak's shade on Meag's bank, two 
short short days ere Maon went from hence, now 
grown to such a length. 

" 'And let him speak of this dear lock of my own 
Maons hair, inclosed in the rings that Roitcaclac, 
Ens king, did give unto my father of that day. 

" ' O let him say, 

" ' Ah, Maon ! generous, fair, and brave, 

Haste hither to thy Moriat, 
Ere that she sin within the grave, 
No longer seen on Coriat. 

" c O ; Maori, if thou canst not come, 

Alla's maid will fly to thee ; 
Thy Moriat should have no home, 

But where her own dear Maon be.* 
VOL. II. 2 o 



402 CHRONICLES 

" And with the men did Craftine go ; and when that 
they had told of Eri, and the brave Fearmor, Craf- 
tine did put the words of Moriat in Clairseac's lips, 
and he did utter them in sounds of melody, though 
not so sweet as her harmonious voice, every sense of 
Maon lay in his ear, whilst the ear itself, if Craftine 
may s-o say, seemed in a trance. 

" Awhile; he turned his eye towards the harp, and 
when he saw Craftine, the youth did fold him, harp 
and all, within his arms ; and spake of Moriat and 
love, of Eri and Fearmor ; nor did his tongue forget 
to speak of Daire, great and good, and Aodmagn- 
maca, pride of UllacFs plains. 

" And to the messengers did Maon say, * To Fear- 
mor haste, and tell, Maon will stand on Eri before 
this moon shall wane/ 

" And unto Craftine did Maon say, ' Let Craf tines 
harp and Craftine s tongue tell to sweet Moriat, the 
heart that Maon stole doth long and sigh to feel the 
panting of the heart he freely gave ; short time, and 
they will meet to part no more.' 

"This is the tale, great king, that Craf tine's harp 
did tell : what more remains, if Glas would speak." 

And Glas, Fearmor s brave son, stood up, and 
said, 

" Four rings did Maon bide with Ner in Crm- 
thens land, and with him Glas, companion of his 
way, and eight of Mumains sons : look to what point 
we may, our ears were open still to hear the voice o* 
Eri if she did call us home. 

" And when four rings were run, the sigh'd-for 
tidings came. 



, OF ERI. 403 

. " And Ner did bring two hundred warriors of the 
Gaol of Feolar to move with Maon on his hither 
way. 

" Our ships did float upon the waters of the land, 
and as they touched the billows of the sea, the winds 
did rage loud from the north, and they did drive us 
on the way that they did fly, and so for three long 
days and two short nights, when we, did come to 
rest on Slainges soft bed. 

" .From thence we came to land, to JEris land ; 
and Ibers sons did bow the head, and bend the knee 
to mighty Baal, and those of Feotar did sprinkle of 
the earth from Cruithen's soil, and they did stand 
thereon, and call upon the spirits of the deep. 

" And we did cast our eyes whither the sun doth 
go, and Maon bad this one and that to speed unto 
the nighest hill, and on the summit light the fires. 
The messengers of Fearmor did say, The hunters* 
eyes; would look upon the hills to ee wh,ich way 
their foot should move. 

"And soon the fires, did b laze,, .fuji,., west and 
south. * 

" Now Gialcad was on the southern border of the 
land of Gaelen, when words did reach his^ear, ' The 
son ofOilliol cometh on the, king.' . ^,, 

" And the heralds were sent forth to assemble the 
warriors of Gaelen and of Mumain, out of hand.. 

" And the warriors of Mumain .did gather them- 
selves together, and they did move towards Maon 
in the heat of love ; aqd the hearts of Gaelen vyere 
hollow towards Gialcad. 

" Maon winged his way on pinions of duty to his 

2 o2 



404 CHRONICLES 

sire, till he did pounce on Gialcad, lank, though 
gorged with Lagoire's and with Oilliors blood. 

" And Maon sought for Gialcad through the host, 
and Gialcad, when he did hear the voice of the her- 
ald, saying, 

" ' Let Gialcad show his blood-stained face to 
Maon, that his ear may hear the wounds of Oilliol 
speak through Maons lips/ (d) 

" Gialcad did hang his head, the weight of blood 
oppressed the spirit, and heavy lay on the arm of 
languid Gialcad. 

" When Maon did perceive a band of chiefs fol- 
lowing the herald's steps, so like was one unto the 
shadow that his fancy drew of hideous Gialcad; he 
spoke to the nine youths who round him stood, * Are 
we not able to beat down this gaunty and his 
props ?' 

"And ere one counteth quick the number of 
five score, Gialcad, and all who raised the arm for 
him, lay on the ground. 

" And we did raise young Maon on our shields, 
and all the warriors gathered round, and when he 
oped his mouth, and he did say, 

" ' Well met, brave fnends ;' a shout was raised, 
and Glas did say aloud, ' An Labrai se, Fir cait' 

" And all cried, ' Labrai.' 

" And the youth Maon said, 

" 'The death-song must not be told, nor war-song 
raised, he slew my father, and my father's father, 
now low by his cursed hand, his fall as glorious as 
many of Eris bravest kings ; his evil spirit hath not 
yet taken flight, let not the balmy air of our sweet 



OF ERI. 405 

Gaelen corrupted be by the last of the foul breath of 
bloody Gialcad? 

" And the host shouted, 

" ' Baal prosper the work of Labrai !\e) 

" And we did lower our shields, and Labrai stood 
on the ground. 

" And the congregation moved to Gialcad, yet in 
life, and they did make fast a rope unto his feet, and 
they did drag his body on the ground unto a pit, (/) 
which had been opened in the earth, and therein did 
they fling the form of Gialcad, calling him Cobta Caol 
Breag, and the earth was settled over him as it had 
been afore, no trace of him remaining. 

" Now Labrai flew as quick as thought, airy 
fancy's nimble herald, to the tents of Coriat ; Alia 
with her damsels sat, as the youth stood within her 
booth, when she withdrew from his embrace, his eyes 
ran wildly round no Moriat was there; he turned 
pale, arid shook, and faultering said, * My Moriat f 

" 'Thy Moriat is well/ delighted Alia said, 'she 
bides since few days passed within the tents of 



" Maon had oft been there ; the horses now were 
faint; lac and JEasog, the gift of generous Daire, 
Ullad's king, to brave Fearmor, of which the chief 
did boast, till words thereof did reach to Cruithens 
land, these now were in the folds, and soon did Glas 
collect a herd, and on we moved for Oirmionn. 

" The chief had not long time afore returned to 
his house, the boards were spread, warriors had with 
him come. 

" Now Aongusa had sent tidings from Maglein 
unto her mother, that Moriat would go whither her 



406 CHRONICLES 

father went, to meet young Maon on his way from 
Cruithens land, and she had gone with her, and the 
two youths did also go ; these things did Beria now 
to Maon tell. 

" When all did eat and were refreshed, save 
Maon, who on fancy fed, we kept on our way, and 
quick as horses feet could move, we hither came, and 
found a welcome at great Daire's boards. 

" And Ullad's king seeth nine of Mumains youth, 
and these are of the Feotar, the sons of Eri one full 
half: and Gaelen hath no king, and Eris throne is 
empty whilst Glas doth speak." 

And Daire rose, and he did give the hand of 
friendship to all round. 

And the night was passed in joy. 

And Crqftine did touch the harp, and told the 
love of Lort and Sorca, the lovely daughter of the 
chief of Allo's land. 

And many a song was sung, and many a tale was 
told ; and Daire suffered not his guests to go while 
nine days passed. 

And ere they went Daire did say to Fcarmor, 
"Daire would send of the children of Ullad even 
unto Mumain, if Cr of tine would teach them how to 
touch the harp." 

And Fearmor and Crafline said, " The children of 
Ullad shall be welcome to the land of Coriat." 

And jDazregave unto Crqftine a splendid harp, the 
like of which hath not been seen in Mumain, and 
Crajiine doth call it Daire. 

And Daire gave to each one of the youths a beau- 
teous horse. 

And to Moriat arid Aongusa, did Eoca the wife f 



OF ERI. 407 

Daire present two mantles, with clasps and bodkins 
of the richest gold. 

And they did come to Fearmors tents ; and Maon 
did take unto him the lovely Moriat. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER VI. 

(a) Maon signifies dumb ; it was given out the child was dumb to 
prevent Gialcad from destroying him, as that infirmity would inca- 
pacitate him from the throne at any future time. 

(i) There is a considerable piece of water called Loc Gur at this 
day, in that part of the country now called Limerick t which was 
formerly called Coriat, and must be these waters of Guma t which 
means a great hollow. 

(c) The real name of the child was Duac t the meaning here is, 
had he not escaped by the name of Maon, Duac would have been 
destroyed. 

(rf)This is an expression full of bitterness and despair to Gialcad; 
the youth not only vows vengeance against the murderer of his fa- 
ther and his father's father, but that the tongue he fondly hoped was 
dumb* conveyed the tidings to the ear of the monster. 

(e) Labrai signifies, he speaks, therefore was this prince also called 
Labrai. 

(/) You have already seen that the punishment of death was not 
inflicted in Eri for any crime but murder with evil mind, which 
was avenged by flinging the murderer alive into a pit, and covering 
him over with the earth made level as before. We hear, from Hero- 
dotus, of " the pit of punishment in Persia." 



408 CHRONICLES 



CHAP. VII. 

The reign of Duac, a space of seven rings, from 237 

to 230. 

GlALCAD being no more, having ruled for the 
course of seventeen rings, many of the nobles of 
Gaelen who had raised their hands for him, having 
fallen on Dunnarig, (a) times passed till the king could 
be chosen. 

And when the princes and nobles were together 
on the mount, Duac the son of Oilliol, the brother of 
Ugoine, was chosen king in Gaelen. 

And when the princes and nobles of Mumain and 
of Gaelen assembled on Magnas y 

Duac was chosen Erimionn. 

Lalrai the son of Oilliol the son of Laogaire, dwelt 
on the portion of his father, and he did keep the Fe- 
otar about him, they went not back to their own 
land. 

And when Duac had ruled for one ring, the mes- 
sengers were sent forth to call together the kings, 
princes, and nobles of Eri, and the chief of the 
Olam, and heacjs of the people, and the judges 
named, and the chief and nobles of Oldanmact, what 
time the fires should be seen on the summits of the 
plains of the land. 

And the messengers added moreover, Labrai hath 
complained of Meorcean (b) chief of Remionn, unto 
Tolard judge of Eri. 

And when the assembly were together, there were 
not so many since the days of Oilliol 13eargneat. 



OF ERI. 409 

And Erimionn was seated on the throne. 

And the kings of Mumain and of Ullad, and the 
chief of Oldanmact, were on their seats ; and all the 
princes of the nations of Eri^ and the nobles were 
under their shields, and the Olam, and heads of the 
people, and the judges, were on their benches. 

When Tolard rose, and said, 

" Let Meorcean chief of Remionn stand before the 
assembly of Eri." 

And Meorcean stood up; and Tolard said, "When 
the assembly shall be together, nine days to come, 
let Meorcean be prepared to answer unto Duac for 
the blood of Oilliol his father, and of Laogaire the 
father of Oilliol, some time Erimionn" 

When the assembly went forth, the feast and the. 
sports were not as aforetime. Duac dwelt in the 
tents of Daire king of Ullad, and Fearmor, and many 
princes and chiefs of Mumain, were with Daire ; and 
Cra/tine did journey from Cor tat, and the harp that 
the king had given to him was with him, and Crqf- 
tine had taught Daire his harp to utter dulcet 
sounds, the like to which have not been heard in 
Eri. 

Now the assembly were together, and when the 
name of Meorcean was called, he was not in his 
place, nor was he to be found, nor heard of. And 
Duac took with him Glas, and of his friends, and 
they did go in quest of Meorcean; but they did re- 
turn as they went. 

And what time Duac did come back, the assembly 
were listening to the words on the roll of the laws of 
Eri, \vhen Duac stood in the midst, and he did say 



410 CHRONICLES 

" When will the assembly hear the words of Degan 
and of Stad, against Meorcean ?'' 

And all were silent till Feargus prince of Ullad 
rose, and said, " When Meorcean is in his place." 

And Duac said, " What not till then?" and he was 
going on to speak, 

When Daire king of Ullad rose, and said, " Daire 
admireth the noble zeal of Duac in pursuit of the 
man whose hand he hath been told did shed his fa- 
ther's blood " Thus far had Daire spoke, when 

Duac, still standing, with warmth said aloud, " O 
Daire, the bloody Meorcean was the first that 
struck P 

And Daire smiled on the youth, and said, " Duac, 
thou art dear unto the heart of Daire, dearer still to 
him the words of the laws of Eri ; what though the 
like hath not been done afore, that any here did bide, 
that may not sit, (c) save when hither called ? What 
if Duac take his seat amongst the princes of his race 
whilst his ear heareth the words on the roll ?" 

And it was so. 

And when all the words were read, Daire rose, 
and said, 

" Duac hath heard, that every tongue must be 
silent of man in his absence." 

And Duac seemed sorrowful, and he said, " Must 
three rings pass, and Meorcean live the while ? He 
and his father struck to death the moment they did 
hear the sound of the voice of Cobta Caol Breag?" 

And Daire said, " When Duac shall hear the 
words of Tainistact." 

And the words were told : and Daire said, " The 



OF E-RI. 411 

death of Oiiliol can be inquired into on the mount 
of Gaelen." 

And Duac was comforted. 

And when three days passed that the book of the 
chronicles had been opened, 

And none stood round the mount for justice, 

And all took their departure, Daire did send four 
youths of Ullad with Craftine, to be instructed how 
to touch the strings of the harp. 

And when Lugad king in Mumain had sat one 
score and seven rings he ceased, and Eunda his son 
was chosen. 

And what time Daire had ruled in Ullad for nine 
rings, Seagar died, and Stacad was chosen Ard 
Olam of Ullad. Seagar hath not been surpassed 
in wisdom by one of the Olam of Eri, nor of Gaelag, 
since the days of Farlat. 

And when Duac had ruled for the course of seven 
rings, he died. And Meorcean was not heard of all 
the days of Duac. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER VII. 

(a) Duna Rig, the fortress of the king. 

(/>) Meorcean means long-Jingefed. 

(c) Labrai could rrot have; been twenty years of age complete at 
the time of the first meeting of the states of Eri in the reign of 
Duac, therefore he could not speak in the general assembly. 



412 CHRONICLES 

CHAP. VIII. 

The reign of Duac, a space of seven rings, from 230 



DUAC having ceased, Duac the son of Oilliol, the 
son of iMogaire, was chosen king in Gaelen. 

And when the assembly of Eri were called toge- 
ther, he was chosen Erimionn also. 

Duac was vain in his own conceit, he regarded not 
the counsel of Daire, which he gave to him concern ' 
ing the children ofFeotar, who had followed his steps 
from the land of Cruithen. 

Whatever evil they wrought, and they wrought 
much, Duac did uphold them, and rebuked them 
not; and Cine the son of Cine, a youth and noble 
of Feotar, did speak insultingly to Melga the son 
of Cob fa, saying unto him, " Are those marks of 
crimson on thy face stains from the blood of Oil 
liol" Melga had two spots on his face from his 
birth. 

And Melga did complain to Duac of Cine, and 
Duac answered unto him, " Wast thou present, Mel- 
ga, when thy father slew my father ?" 

And when the assembly of Eri were together, what 
time Duac had ruled six rings, these words of Duac 
were repeated ; and moreover the king f umain 
and of Ullad, and the princes and nobles of these 
lands, yea, and of Gaelen, saw with an evil eye the 
tents of the warriors of Feotar raised up round about 
the assembly. 

And Melga did speak secretly to one now, a: id 



OF ERI. 413 

aow to another, of the sayings and doings of Duac ; 
and he did discover that the children of Gaelen had 
withdrawn their love from Duac, and Melga did con 
spire with them against Erimionn. 

And Melga did gather together a great host. 

And Duac did call together the warriors, and a 
strange sight was seen in Eri : the men of Gaelen 
moving against Erimionn, and Mumain was one half 
with Melga, Conn prince of Ib Lugad, and all the 
chiefs to the south of Amanmor; but the king of 
Mumain came not forth. 

And Duac and Melga came in sight each of the 
other on the borders of Mumain and of Gaelen 
amongst the hills of Ceas. 

And Melga bad the heralds to say, in the hearing 
of Duac, 

" What strangers are these who carry their spears 
erect upon the soil of Eri? Let them depart to the 
land of their dwelling." 

And Duac said aloud, " The men that slew Cob- 
ta Caol Breag will move to the land of their dwell- 
ing round the tents of Erimionn, over the body of 
Melga." 

And words ran through the hosts, " To battle!" 

And the heralds that stood round Melga cried 
aloud, 

"Men of Eri, let it not be said in times to 
come, that one of the mongrels escaped from the 
battle." 

And the warriors fought with fury ; but the men 
of Mumain did little more than view the battle ; and 
Duac was overpowered, he fell ; and all the warriors 
of Feotar > not one did out-live that day. 



414 CHRONICLES 

And Melga bad, " Let the children of the land of 
Cruithen be laid after the manner of that Gaal" 

And it was so* - 

And the heap of Duac was raised where he fell. 

And his name at the first was Duac the son of 
Oillioly and he was called Maon; and on the day that 
Gialcad fell he was called Labrai by all the host, and 
in that name doth he stand on the roll of kings ; and 
he is called Loingseac, for that he did coaie with 
many ships to Eri the first time since the Gaal of 
Sciot did hither come with the sous of the hero. 

And the entrance into the laud by the waters of 
Slwnge is no longer called Imbior Slainge, but Loc- 
garman, because thereby did the Gaal of Feotar 
move into Eri. 

Nor is the portion of lolar called Gaelen since that 
time ; it is called Laigean, because of the spears of 
the Gaal of Feotar. . > . j 

And when the battle had ceased, and Duac lay 
ki death, Meorcean the chief of Remiowi, who had 
come into the fight, did stand before Melga, and 
Melga bad that 'he should be^kept in hold to answer 
for the blood of Oilliol 

And Duac ruled for the course of seven rings. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER VIII. 

(a) This river is at present called Blackwater, it falls' into the 
Atlantic at Youghall. 

Never yet has the introduction of armed foreigners failed to ex- 
cite the jealousy and ill-wilj'of the people. When things have come 
to the pass, tjrat the great body of any community must submit to 
such an enormity, it is a sure symptom that their liberties are gone 
in fact, and if they should be called a free people, the epithet is a 
deception. 



OF ERI. 415 

No prince was more popular than Labrai, to which many circum- 
stances conspired. The horrible assassination of his father and 
grandfather, his early misfortunes, his piety to his father, his faith- 
ful love for Moriat, celebrated by the bards, the theme of song and 
of the harps, the attachment of the bravest and most potent of the 
chiefs of Mumain towards him, all could not sustain him against the 
one vicious measure of retaining two hundred foreigners, and even 
these born of the daughters of Eri. He is called Labrai in the roll of 
kings, though his name was Duac, from the circumstance mentioned 
by Glas. To cause the pursuit of Qialcad after the child to cease, 
it was given out that he was dumb, and called Maon ; but when he 
was raised on the shields of the warriors after the fall of Giakad, and 
opened his mouth, and spoke, Glas said aloud, " An labrai se ?" 
Does not he speak ? and all said, " Labrai" he doth speak ; from 
which time he was called Labrai; and having returned with a fleet 
of ships to Eri, he had the addition of Loingseac, which signifies a 
fleet. This is a proof that the Gaol of Feotar, who came to Eri 
in the year 299 and settled in Britain, were also called Garman, 
the Germanni of the Romans: the port of Wexford is not known 
by any other name but that of Loc Garman at this. day. Now, too, 
the kingdom of Gaelcn changed its name for Laigean, the spear of 
the Feotar being called Laigean, from which the people of Leinstcr, 
and the parts of Munster contiguous, call a spade laige, pronounced 
loy-e. 



CHAP. IX. 

The reign of Melga, a space of twelve rings, from 
223 Io2\l 



the son of Gialcad was chosen king in 
Laigean, 

And he called together the judges to the mount ; 
and Meorcean was placed before the assembly : and 
Degan and Stad were called, and they held up their 
right hands, and they did invoke the spirit of Oilliol, 
and they said, 



416 CHRONICLES 

That when Gialcad's voice was heard by Dub 
the father of Meorcean, and by Meorcean, they did 
rush in haste from the place where they did stand, 
and Degan and Stad did speed after them. 

And Gialcad stood over Laogaire lying on the 
ground, and Oilliol did enter; and Meorcean did 
raise his arm and smote him many times, even to 
death. 

And Tolard said unto Meorcean, " Thou hast 
heard the words spoken against thee ; what hast thou 
to answer thereunto?" 

And Meorcean was silent ; he looked upon Melga 
piteously. And Melga said aloud, "Turn not thy 
face towards me, Meorcean, my heart feeleth not for 
thee. Did my father lose his reason, shall Melga 
lose his fame ? 

" Let the judges speak." 

And Tolard said, " Shall the roll of the laws be 
spread ?" 

And all held up their hands. 

And the words were read. 

And the heralds did deliver him to the messengers 
of the judge: and a great congregation surrounded 
Meorcean, and he was flung out of sight. 

And all minds thought well of Melga therefor, 
and he is called Molbtac. (a) 

And when the assembly of Eri were altogether 
Daire was there also ; and so well was he pleased 
at the doings and sayings of Melga, when the heralds 
spoke aloud, " The throne is empty," 

Daire king in Ullad said, " Let Melga the son of 
Giulcad take the throne." 

And Melga was chosen. 



OF ERI. 417 

And Melga ruleth in justice. Since Ugoine had 
ceased, the laws did lose their force in Mumain and 
in Laigean, till now that Melga did give them their 
due weight. 

Daire is the delight of Ullad ; Ullad is in repose, 
and Oldanmact is in contentment. 

Now when Melga had been on the throne during 
four rings, Eunda king in Mumain died, and Mog- 
corb his son was chosen king in that land. 

And in the ring that followed, Conn prince of Ib 
Lugaddied also, and Lore his brother was chosen in 
his stead ; and Mogcorb did take Lorca the daugh- 
ter of Lore. 

And it was thought by Mogcorb and Lore that 
Erimionn did design to divide Mumain against the 
king, and to set those who did adhere to the sons 
of Duac against those who had favoured the sons of 
Gialcad aforetime. 

And the men who did collect Cios for Erimionn, 
were told to press more heavily on the north than on 
the south of Mumain. 

And thus did times pass for the circuit of eleven 
rings, when the tax-men did come upon the lands of 
Mogcorb with violence ; and as they did drive off 
cattle of the king, men of Mumain rose, and slew 
them. 

And Erimionn did send letters to Mogcorb to 
answer when the assembly should be together. 

And when the assembly were together what time 
Melga had ruled during twelve rings, 

Melga rose, and said, 

" Let the king of Mumain answer, why were 
the men slain that collect the Cios for Erimionn" 

VOL. n. 2 E 



418 CHRONICLES 

And Mogcorb answered, 

" The men were slain, for that they entered into 
the land as the foe to take off a spoil." 

And Daire said, " This cometh of the Fir Cios of 
Ugoine. Why may not Mumain send its portion as 
in Ulladr 

And Melga said, " The arm of the warrior shall 
uphold the laws of Ugoine." 

And there was a loud uproar. 

And Daire said, " This is the first, let it be the 
last time that the assembly of Eri shall hear of laws 
of this man or of that. 

" The laws are laws of Eri" 

And Mogcorb hasted to Mumain, and he called 
together the warriors: and Melga thought to take 
him unawares ; and he assembled a great host, and 
he moved towards the tents of Mogcorb on Brug- 
rig.(b) 

And what time he reached to the waters of Meag, 
the warriors of Mumain were moving towards him, 
and Mogcorb bad the heralds to say aloud, in the 
hearing of Melga, 

" Are these Fir Cios come for a spoil ?" 

But Melga followed riot his steps, he fought on 
the left: Siorna his brother did lead the battle against 
Mogcorb. 

And the warriors fought with fury, Mogcorb 
sought Melga but found him not. 

INow Lore prince of Ib Lugad, when he saw the 
sasion of Erimionn,lie did quicken his pace towards 
him ; and he did speak to the men of the hills, " Be- 
hold the tax-man and his drivers !" 

And they raised a shout, and they darted forward 



OF ERI. 419 

as the arrow from the bow, and they did cut through 
all in their way: and Melga fell by the hand 01 
Lore. 

And Mogcorb hasted with the warriors, they turn 
ed not back, they kept on their way to the mount 01 
Laigean on Magnas ; and Mogcorb had all the ap- 
parel of the assembly of .En' removed to Teacmor on 
Tobrad ; and Mogcorb abided in his tents on To- 
brad, into the chambers of the king in Teacmor he 
entered not. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER IX 

(a) Molbtac is acceptable, because of his conduct in the matter of 
Meorcean. 

(b) Bmgrig, the house of the king; the land lieth south-west of 
Charkvillc, in the county of Limerick. 



CHAP. X. 

The reign of Mogcorb the son of Eunda of the race 
of Iber, a space of six rings , from 211 to 205. 

Now Aongus the son of Duac, some time Erimionn, 
was in Ullad when tidings came to Daire of the 
death of Melga : one moon only had passed since 
he had come to the age, and he hasted to Laigean. 

And when the assembly of Laigean were together, 
Aongus the son of Duac, the son of Oilliol, the son 
of Laogaire, the son of Ugoine, was chosen king in 
Laigean. 

And when the words of the messengers were heard 
calling the assembly of Eri to the high chamber of 



429 CHRONICLES 

Teacmor on Tobrad, they gladdened the hearts of 
Ullad r and of Oldanmact ; all the kings, and princes, 
and nobles of Eri, and heads of the people, and the 
chief and nobles of Oldanmact, and a vast congrega- 
tion were on Tobrad. 

And Mogcorb did not send back all the warriors 
of Mumain. 

And when the assembly were together, and the 
heralds said, 

" The throne is empty," 

The king of Ullad rose, and said, " The throne 
may not be taken whilst warriors stand on 7V 
brad." 

And Mogcorb rose, and said, " The children of 
Mumain shall move to the land of their dwelling on 
the morrow." 

And Daire said, " On the morrow, the kings, and 
princes, and nobles will say." 

And it was so. 

And on the morrow Mogcorb king in Mumain 
was chosen. 

And he went forth to Liafail ; and when he re- 
turned to the high chamber, and the chief secretary 
said, " Let Mogcorb the son of Eundafrom Reactad 
sit on the throne Erimionn" 

Mo gcorb standing before the throne, said aloud, 

" Not so. Let the chief secretary say, Ardri, not 
Erimionn" 

And it was so. 

And Mogcorb took his seat. 

And he rose again, and said, " Let the tiame of 
Mogcorb be set down on the roll of kings, Ardri." 

And it was so. 



F ERI. 42f 

And when Mogcorb had ruled two rings, Slo* 
cad died, and Nonan was chosen Ard Olam of 
Ullad. 

And when Mogcorb had ruled,.4rdr,for the course 
of six rings, he did eat of eels, and he did sicken 
and die. 

Note. The declaration of the states in favour of the race oflolar 
was void on the accession of Mogcorb from Jber. Now Ardri was 
substituted for Erimionn, and Teacmor on Tobrad for the mount of 

Laigean on Magnas. 



CHAP. XL 

The reign of Aongus the son of Duac, a space oj 
seven rings, from 205 to 198. 



the brother of Mogcorb was c'u sen 
king in Mumain. 

Aongus the son of Duac was chosen Ardri. 

He had passed times with Daire in Ullad, and he 
had inclined his ear to the lessons of wisdom f om 
the lips of the Olam; he was stored with the know- 
ledge of truth, more than the sons of Erimionn are 
wont to be. 

Aongus was disciple to Lolar, and he delighted 
to be called Doacla and Olam. 

And the friendship of Daire towards him wa* 
perfect, and Aongus did rule in justice. 

When Cairbre had ruled for four rings in Mumain 
he died, and Fearcorb his brother was chosen. 

And when seven rings had been run, Cental the 
son r *f Melga did conspire against Aongus. It was 



422 CHRONICLES 

said that Aongtis did laugh in derision at rhymes 
which Congal did set down : and they did speak 
loudly towards each other. 

Therefore did Congal conspire against Aongus; 
and the warriors were assembled, and they did come 
face to face on the plain of Almuin. 

And Aongus fell by the hand of Congal, when he 
had ruled for seven rings. 



CHAP. XII. 

The reign of Congal the son o/'Melga, a space of 
seven rings, from 198 to 191. 

CONGAL was chosen king in Laigean. 

And he was also chosen Ardri. 

Daire would not rule, as he increased in years 
he did increase in wisdom. Ullad and Oldanmact live 
in peace, whilst Mumain and Laigean are torn in 
pieces ; the princes of Laigean from Duac flattering 
the nobles of one part of Mumain, and those from 
Cobta soothing the chiefs of another part of that 
land. 

As for Congal he spendeth his time in composing of 
verses for the minstrels, and tales for the bards, and 
the bards do call him Gleo Fatac; howbeit, little 
was the knowledge of what was good to know that 
Congal had. 

And when he had ruled for seven rings, he did 
send with insult, as his father had done, to levy the 
Cios from Mumain. And Fearcorb called together 



OF ERI. 423 

the warriors ; and he came upon Congal, and he 
slew him, saying, " Shall tax-men of the Gaol 
suffer for the transgression of him that sencteth 
them ?" 



CHAP. XIII. 

The reign of Fearcorb the son of Eunda, a space of 
seven rings, from 191 to 184. 

CON LA the son of Melga was chosen king in 
Laigean. 

Now the voice of Eri called aloud upon Daire 
to rule, Ardri ; but he would not be entreated. " Is 
it not good (he said) to preserve one half of Eri in 
peace : there is no soul (said he) in Mumain, neither 
is there heart nor soul in Laigean" 

And Fearcorb was chosen Ardri. 

He ruleth in peace : Eri seemed to enjoy repose, 
but the minds of the children of lolar vyere not dis- 
posed to quiet ; they never ceased to conspire against 
Mumain or Ullad, or against each other. 

And when he had ruled seven rings, Conla king 
in Laigean, whose eye had looked with kindness a^t 
all times on Fearcorb, did invite him to come to his 
tents raised up on Ceas to a hunting. 

And Fearcorb, brave and generous, having no 
suspicion within his mind of any harm being intend- 
ed towards him, went thither with a slender train. 

And when they had been on the hills for four 



424 CHRONICLES 

days, as Feaicorb lay in his tent, he was spoiled of 
life with treachery. 

And Conla bewailed him, and his heap was 
raised. 

And Conla returned to his place. 



CHAP. XIV. 

The reign of Conla, a space of four rings, from 184 

to 180. 

IBER the youngest of the sons of Eunda, was 
chosen king in Mumain. 

And Conla was chosen Ardri. 

And he did lament Fearcorb. 

Now Conla, being full of deceit, the thought did 
enter into the minds of men, that Conla did know of 
the manner of FearcorVs death. 

And when he had ruled two rings, and the assem- 
bly of Eri were on Tobrad, words were spoken in 
thai sort that came to the ear of Iber, and he did 
make inquiry through Ceas, and all around. 

And when Conla had ruled four rings, Iber sent 
letters unto Leim judge of Eri, saying, 

" Let Conla, Ardri, answer for the blood of Fear- 
corb." And ere Baal had passed two chambers of 
his house Deirionac, he sickened, wasted, and died : 
and he is called Croidecealgac, because of the false- 
hood and treachery of his heart, 



OF ERI. 425 



CHAP. XV. 

The reign of Oilliol the son of Melga, a space oj 
twenty -five rings, from 180 to 155, 

OlLLIOL the son of Melga was chosen king in 
Laigean, and Ardri. 

Daire would not hold up his hand for one nor for 
the other of the princes of Mumain nor of Laigean, 
his whole desire was to preserve Ullad and Oldan- 
mact in peace, 

And Oilliol was inclined to peace, his frame was 
weakly. 

Though Daire was very aged, the faculties of his 
mind were not impaired, yet did he desire to quit 
the throne of Ullad. 

And when the assembly were together on Aod- 
magnmaca, he said, " Let my ear listen to the voice 
of the harp, and to the bards telling tales of other 
times, if one younger than Daire may rule." 

And all said, as with one voice, " What more doth 
Daire desire than the peace and happiness of Ullad? 
Can he not hear the harp, and the bard, with the ear 
of the king whilst he doth live ?" 

And Daire raised his voice in words of thanks. 

Now when Daire had ruled three score rings and 
five, Nonan died, and Meascar was chosen Ard Olam 
of Ullad. 

And when Daire had ruled three score and twelve 
rings, he died, and all Ullad was gathered together 
to Aodmagnmaca ; arid the weight of Daire was 
borne to Dun Sobairce, and his heap hath been raised 



426 CHRONICLES 

nigh unto the heap of Eocaid Olam Fodla, the chil 
dren of the land calling him Daire the wise, the great, 
the good. 

And Ros the son of Connor, the first-born of 
Daire, was chosen king in Ullad. 

Ros walketh in the way of his race, loving peace 
and justice: he ruled five rings, and Fionn his bro- 
ther was chosen king in Ullad. 

And when Fionn had ruled two rings, he died ; 
and Connor his brother was chosen. 

And when Oilliol had sat on the throne for one 
score rings and one, Iber king in Mumain ceased ; 
and Adamair the son of Fearcorb was chosen. 

And Adamair took the daughter of Strom, of the 
race of the chiefs of Oldanmact, which was grief to 
the minds of the sons of Er; for Ros said, " Now 
will the racers of Mumain chase men and cattle 
through the plains of Eri" All the words of Ros 
were words of wisdom. 

And when the assembly of Eri were together, 
what time Oilliol had sat one score and five rings, 
Adamair stopped not his tongue from saying, that 
his father's blood should be inquired of from the sons 
of Melga. 

And Ros did speak in the ear of Meirt chief of 
Oldanmact, least Strom may move the Danan for 
Adamair. 

And when all took their departure from Teacmor, 
Adamair sent through Mumain to assemble the war- 
riors ; and Strom did gather together of the Danan, 
and the men of Mumain did meet from the borders 
of the Secmaman, the men of Oldanmact on the plains 
of Ceseol. 



ofr ERI. 427 

And Ardri led the warriors of JLaigean to meet 
Adamair : and when he was in sight of the host of 
Mumain, he bad the heralds say, " Whither goeth 
Adamair abroad, when the very bees are in their 
houses ?" 

And Adamair answered, " Bees go forth to gather 
honey from the herb ; not so the hunters who \ 
on Ceas to chase the deer, and killed a king. 

"Adamair is bound for Teacmor, to make inquiry 
of his father's blood, sucked by the treacherous wea- 
sel Conla : a marvel the tusks of Oilliol did not tear 
his flesh. Let no foot stop his way." (a) 

And the warriors stood face to face. The force 
of Oilliol could not stop Adamair. 

Oilliol fell, and a great slaughter was made of 
the princes and of the Gaol of Laigean. 

And Adamair pursued his course to Teacmor, 
with the host of Mumain and Strom, and the Danan 
returned to their place. 

(a) Oilliol was called Caitfeaclac, allqding to a defect in his teeth ; 
this expression of Adamair was in sarcastic allusion thereto. 



CHAP. XVI. 

The reign of Adamair the son of Feareorb, a space 
of Jive rings, from 165 to 150. 

EOCAID the son of Oilliol was chosen king in 
Laigean. 

Adamair abided on Tobrad, and was chosen Ar- 
dri by the princes and nobles of Mumain. 



428 CHRONICLES 

He thought to draw the Danan to him by means 
of Strom, whose daughter, Fluidis, Adamair had 
taken. But Meirt did reprove Strom sharply for 
what he had done ; and Strom did give the word of 
promise he would forbear between the princes of 
Mumain and of Laigean for the times to come. 

Arid when these things came to the ear of Eocaid 
the son of Oilliol, he assembled the men of Laigean 
privily to come together as they could towards Im- 
loc where the tents of Ardri were raised at the 
time. 

And Oilliol came on Adamair unawares, he did 
fear to come before him prepared for battle. 

And Adamair gathered together a little band ; 
and they did fight whilst one remained : all fell in 
death round about the tents of the king on Imloc, 
Adamair having ruled for the course of five rings. 



CHAP. XVII. 

The reign of Eocaid the son of Oilliol, a space of 
seven rings, from 150 to 143. 

EOCAID hasted to Teacmor, and he did enter 
into the house of the king. 

And what though the messengers of Eri were sent 
forth, none came to Tobrad but those of Laigean : 
the ears of Ullad were faint because of the doings 
of Mumain and of Laigean ; the princes and nobles 
of these lands were evil towards each other continu- 
ally, and they did stir up the Goal to be foes one to 
the other. 



OF ERI. 429 

And Nias the son of Fearcorb, and brother of 
Adamair was chosen king in Mumain. 

And Eocaid was chosen Ardri. 

The mind of Eocaid was inclined to peace ; his 
thoughts were more on the adorning of his person 
than on things useful to be done ; that his flowing 
locks, and gorgeous mantles should be seen, was his 
chief care : a new mantle did Eocaid wear each day 
that he did sit on the throne in the high chamber of 
Teacmor. 

And Connor said, u Is it not good that this one of 
the sons of lolar is not intent on things that would 
be worse?" 

And when Connor had ruled ten rings, Meascar 
died, and Laoi was chosen Ard Olam of Ullad. 

And when Connor had ruled twelve rings, he 
ceased, and Cormac his son was chosen king in 
Ullad. 

And when Eocaid had ruled for the course of 
seven rings, and the assembly were together on To- 
brad, Feargus the son of Breasal, the son of Aon- 
gus, the son of Duac, the son of Oilliol, the son of 
Laogaire, the son of Ugoine, did conspire with Nias 
king in Mumain against Ardri, and he did draw unto 
him moreover of the nobles of Laigean. 

Nor did the air, now piercing cold, chill the heat 
of the warriors of Mumain, ever ready for the battle 
as for the chase. 

And when Eocaid heard of the doings of Feargus, 
he did send messengers unto Cormac to tell him 
thereof. 

And the king called me Laoi unto him, and he 
did say unto the messengers, 



430 CHRONICLES 

" Tell unto Eocaid the words of Cormac a son of 
JBr, 

" Are the Gaol of Sciot as lambs for the teeth of 
the wolf? are they as deer for the chase of the hun- 
ter ? Will the sons of lolar never cease to defile the 
land with the blood of the people?" 

And the messenger went his way, and Cormac bad 
me Laoi to set down his words for the ear of the 
assembly of Ullad. 

And Feargus had hasted unto the north of Mum- 
ain, and he did lead the chiefs of that land, and his 
host did swell ; and as he moved towards the mount 
of Laigean, beneath Meist, the warriors of Ardri 
were coming to meet them, with the weight of Lai- 
gean, and of the chiefs of Ib Lugad. 

And Eocaid said aloud, " Behold the ravens of 
Mumain flying hitherward, following the track of 
the vulture, to gorge on the blood of Laigean? 

And Feargus said, " Fear hath confounded the 
sight of Eocaid; let him look again, and he will dis- 
tinguish the eagle directing the foot of the horsemen 
to ride over the sons of Cobta? 

And the battle endured from the time that Baal 
had shewed his face, for one-half of a ratha of that 
day, till darkness began to spread his mantle over the 
shoulders of Mullocmeist. 

And ere light had flown away, the noise ran 
through the host that Eocaid had been slain. 

And the host of Laigean gathered round the form 
of Eocaid, and they abided through the night. 

And on the morrow as Baal came forth, the war- 
riors raised up the weight of Eocaid, and they did 



OF ERI. 431 

bear it to the binn of Heist, and there did they raise 
his heap. 

And they did roll a huge stone to the summit of 
the heap beneath which Eocaid had been laid, and 
the stone was raised on an end thereof. 

Eocaid having ruled for the full course of seven 
rings. 

And Feargus moved to Magnas. 



CHAP. XVIII. 

The reign of Feargus, of the race o/*Iolar, a space 
of twelve rings, from 143 to 131. 

FEARGUS had moved towards the mount of Lai- 
gean, whilst Eocaid lay in the arms of death on 
Meist. 

And the warriors stood on the mount, and raised 
Feargus on their shields, and thus was he king in 
Laigean. 

And in like sort was he Ardri on Tobrad; in the 
arms of war was he placed on Liafail, and the men 
on Tobrad did bear the sword ; and thus did he use 
the name of king during three rings, ere the doors of 
the high chamber were opened. 

And when Feargus had taken his seat on the 
throne, 

Cormac rose, and said, 

" Words have been spread through Eri, and so 
have they reached the ears of the king, and princes 
and nobles of ITllad, saying, 

" Feaigus the son of Breasal, from Laogaire of 



432 CHRONICLES 

lolar, hath been seated on the throne of Eri by a 
band of men armed for battle." 

And the words were not denied. 

And Cormac said, " Twere good that Feargus 
took his seat on the i?eatof the king of Laigean, and 
that the kings, princes, and nobles of Eri said who 
shall rule, Ardri? 

And Feargus came down from the throne, and he 
sat on the seat of the king of Laigean. 

And the chief secretary said aloud, 

" The throne is empty." 

And Cormac rose, and said, " Let Feargus king in 
Laigean rule, Ardri." 

And it was so. 

And he went forth to Liqfail, and Ard Cruim- 
tear placed the asion on the head, and Nias king in 
Mumain laid the mantle on the shoulders of Fe- 
argus. 

And Feargus lived all his days of twelve rings in 
peace ; there were not of the princes from Cobta 
many to trouble him ; and when he had ruled twelve 
rings he died. 



CHAP. XIX. 

The reign o/*Aongus Tuirmeac the son of Feargus, 
from Duac the son ofOi\\io\ the son of Laogaire, 
a space of one score and twelve rings, from 131 
to 99. 

Now Aongus the son of Feargus was chosen king in 
Laigean. 



OF ERI. 433 

And he was also chosen Ardri in the presence of 
the assembly of Eri. 

And the boards were spread, and feasts and sports 
were prepared, the like to which had not been seen 
on Tobrad since the days of Maca the partner of 
Ciombaot. 

And Aongus won the hearts of all, he was not like 
unto the race of lolar in any of his ways. 

And he dwelleth in Teacmor now two rings that 
he hath ruled. 

And Cormac king in Ullad died, having ruled for 
seventeen rings, and JEocaid the son of Connor was 
chosen. 

And when Eocaid had ruled one ring, Laoi died, 
and Tuigseac was chosen Ard Olam of Ullad. 

Now when Aongus had ruled six rings, he did go 
with Eocaid to Aodmagnmaca, after the assembly did 
depart to their dwellings: all strove to delight the 
senses of Aongus, and they were delighted. 

And he did meet there Ruidruide the son of Ros 
prince of Er, and they did give the hand of friend- 
ship one to the other, and Eocaid did give many pre- 
sents to Aongus. 

And the disciples of those whom Craftine did in- 
struct did tell the tale of Maon and Moriat on the 
sweet harp; and Fraisgaire, the most eloquent of all 
the bards of Ullad, did tell the story with his lips. 
And Aongus returned to Teacmor. 
Now birds began to sing, the herbs to grow, the 
trees did put the margin of their foliage forth to 
guard the parent from the burning sun; the clouds 
were spent, and fishes now did sport in their own 
streams. 

VOL. II. 2 F 



434 CHRONICLES 

And now it was that Aongus went, as oft he went 
afore, to the western country of the waters of the 
land, to the tents of Cormac chief of Fobar, a friend 
of Laogaires race. 

Aongus was fond of wine, he had a generous heart, 
he delighted in the chase ; but he indulged his pas- 
sion in the enjoyment of many a damsel of the 
daughters of the land, e'en to excess. 

And Aine the daughter of Aongus was at this time 
in Cormac's tent. 

The maid of Taos and Nerida was also there, 
Mara was her name, fairest amongst the fair was 
she. After a while Aongus returned to Teacmor, and 
soon came back again to Cormac 's booth. 

The charms of this maid were present to the fancy 
of Aongus, do what he would, go where he may. 

There happed to be with Cormac then, the youth 
Airt, the son of brave Feargrim the chief of Oir. 
Feargrim and Airt were friends of Aongus, and the 
sons of Duac ; many a time and oft did Feargrim 
stand in the front amidst the heaviest blows of battle 
against Aongus $ foes. 

And Airt did pine for Aine the daughter of the 
king : the sighs of the youth were full of pain, for that 
he felt no hope of a return of his love. 

Aine and Mara, lovely maids, had given vows of 
everlasting love, and Airt had won the ear of Mara 
to listen to his tales of love for Aine his soul's de- 
light. 

Now on an afternoon as Airt and Mara talked 
together, Aongus happed to come the way, and stole 
on their discourse in sport ; and hearing an appoint- 



OF ERI. 435 

ment made the evening next to come, Aongus did 
creep off un perceived. 

Mara sought the means of telling unto Aine the 
words of Airt, but could not speak in full, nor more 
than to say, if Aine come to such a place at such a 
time, Mara hath secret words for Aine's ear. 

Mara thought it best that the daughter of the king 
should hear the words of Airt e'en from himself. 

When the next day came, Aongus went forth to 
hunt ; in the tents of Cormac nought was heard but 
JLittas voice, and preparation for the feast ; all save 
Litta, and her little ones, and the damsels who 
waited on her tongue and eye, accompanied the king, 
the hunters were to chase to-day nigh unto Cormac s 
booth. 

Now all were seated at the board, and they did 
eat, and the full horns went round, and Aongus 
drank, his spirits were raised high, and he was bold. 

And whilst the hunters sat, Aongus slipped off 
alone, and moved to the sequestered spot that A/ora 
told to Aine of, the cloak of Airt about the should- 
ers of the king. 

Aongus had not been long in his retreat, ere thaf 
he heard a footstep on the breeze approaching to' 
where he stood. 

A damsel with timid pace, her breathing half sup- 
pressed, now moving, now stopping, to listen if she 
could hear the sound of any foot, or else, entered the 
bower. 

Aongus desperate in love, from drink quite mad, 
laid his rude hands upon the maid, and in the wink- 
ing of the stars, the moon did hide her face from very 
shame, he spoiled the cheeks of Aine of their maiden 

2*2 



436 CHRONICLES 

bloom, and robbed her peaceful bosom for ever of 
its rest : whilst Aongus, unconscious of the mighty 
havoc he had made, did fancy he had wildly wan- 
toned in the charms of the subdued and bashful 
Mara. 

The conquest gained that ruined her, and made the 
victor poor, he stole away not unlike unto a thief, 
but thief himself, leaving the wreck of his inglorious 
prize in a whirlwind of conflicting passions, on a sea 
of agony. 

And thus did Mara find the friend of her young 
and tender heart, the partner of her every secret 
thought. Alas ! how changed from the fair and 
sprightly Aine, from whom she had parted a little 
while gone by. 

Ah, what availed the piteous words of sobbing 
Mara! poor Ames tongue could answer nought 
save in lamentations of despair more forcibly ex- 
pressed in inarticulate sound than form of speech. 

Long while ere gentle Mara thought to raise un- 
happy Aine from the earth, polluted by the man who 
ought to have preserved the land from any stain. 
When thought did come, friendship gave Mara 
strength, she raised her up, and helped her to the 
dwelling of the chief. 

. But when poor Aine's tongue could speak, and 
she had told her cause of sorrow now in full in Ma- 
ra's ear, the very name of Airt was poison to their 
lips. 

And these two friends did 'say and think, and 
think and utter not, and speak without thought, till 
sense had gone astray. 
. Thus did they pass the whole night through, for 



OF ERI. 437 

Aine said, " Mara will not leave me now." And on 
the morrow when their seats were empty at the 
board, Litta, the mother of Cormac's children, came 
to see what might betide. 

She was told their spirits needed rest ; still they 
did keep the secret under guard. Litta again did 
come, and Mara said, " If Litta would forbear a little 
while." 

And Mara spake to Aine, " This must be told ; 
if Litta was to hear what happed from Mara's lips?" 
And Aine said, " Mara will do as she thinks good." 

And Mara did commit all that Aine knew to 
Littas ear; and off did Litta go in haste to seek the 
hideous Airt. 

She found the youth ; but when he heard the 
words " Perfidious Airt /" he clasped his hands, 
looked on the ground with wonder struck, and 
seemed to dread the meeting of good Litta's eye in 
such a sort. 

That she abhorred him in her very soul ; and ere 
he spoke one word, she vanished from the spot 
whereon she stood, as though the very air by his foul 
breath would tainted be. 

As the lonesome tree on RonarcTs brow, when it 
hath felt the shivering breeze after a night of frost, 
its mantling drapery falling all around, when most 
it seems to want the warmth thereof, so stood the so- 
litary Airt, in life indeed, but motionless and cold ; 
e'en the film of hope in which his youthful fancy was 
attired, took wing unto the clouds, clean out of 
sight. 

'Twas long until a thought, to call a thought, re- 
turned unto the mind of Airt; at length it said, " To 



438 CHRONICLES 

Mara go, she will tell what Litta means." In quest 
of Mara Airt did go, with all the speed he could. 

'Twas long ere that he found the maid. 

She sat in Litta's tent; her left hand round the 
waist, her right hand gently pressing the distracted 
head of her unhappy friend, whilst her eyes looked 
downward OH the almost lifeless form of this child 
of woe. 

But when they upward moved, and met the figure 
of the youth, she uttered such a scream, as one that 
half awaked from a frightful dream, fancied that an 
evil messenger of air was present to his view. 

She fell as into the arms of death, and with her 
sunk the weight of ruinated Aine, 

Whilst Airt stood as the young pine, scorched by 
heaven's own fire, when Baal speaks wrathfully to 
the children of the eartji. 

Thus were they seen by Litta, called to the tent 
by the shrill sound of Mara 's voice, whither she did 
speed to minister unto these fair partners in affliction, 
unconscious of the presence of detested Airt. 

And she did comfort them ; and now revived, 
when Airt did forward spring to raise them from the 
ground, 

They shrieked as though a wolf had darted on 
them, and hid their heads terrified. 

A while, when / itta thus addressed the maddened 
youth, 

" Methought to the dwelling of thy sire that thou 
hadst fled, no longer to pollute the hitherto un- 
stained tents of Cormac ; here thou art no longer wel- 
come, soon will the vengeance of the king overtake 
thee, guilty Airt. 



OF KR1. 439 

" So much my spirit loaths thee, Airt, no greater 
pleasure could I feel than seeing thee weltering in 
thy blood, in variety of lengthened pains." 

When Airt in misery spake, " How long or short 
Airt breathes neither doth he know nor care ; yet let 
him not be wronged. 

" The sun and moon and ail the stars are witnessed 
of his words, he hath no knowledge of the cause of 
Litta's wrath, nor of the terror of these lovely maids 
at his approach." 

" No knowledge, sayest thou ?" Litta enraged, re- 
plied, 

"Hast thou not dared with violent hand to rifle 
the beauteous Aine of her maiden treasure? Callest 
thou this no cause of Litta s wrath, the horror of 
these twain, the vengeance of the king?" 

" Let Litta hear, and Mara, and lovely Aine> for 
whom alone unhappy Airt doth wish to live, Airt is 
as innocent of what Litta saith as Litta self. Airt 
would think his whole of life well spent in service of 
Aine his beloved, alas, now woe begone! 

" Could Airt in rudeness touch the. person of 
the daughter of the king, fire should consume this 
my right hand when it had taken vengeance of his 
false fellow. 

" Harbour not a thought that doth so great a 
wrong to Feargrim's son. 

" Had madness seized on Airt as Litta thought, 
he would have justified him by his proper self ere 
now. 

" But as in me there is no fault towards the gentle 
Aine, if love, chaste love, be not a fault, I'll seek the 



440 CHRONICLES 

taker of this mighty theft throughout the land, and 
take the Eric of his life in hideous sort." 

To hateful loathing amazement did quick suc- 
ceed : now assured of his innocence and faith, Airt 
was admitted to companionship of wretchedness. 
The damsels more composed, Airt went his way, 
breathing revenge, his every thought intent on 
blood. 

Now Aine was laid upon her bed, beside sat -Litta, 
Mara walked forth, a child of Litta in her hand. 

Far they had not moved till Mara heard a footstep 
from behind : she turned to see, and Jo, the king ! 

The air, the words tf Aongus amazed the eye and 
ear of Mara, but when he whispered of the raptur- 
ous joy he felt in the sweet dalliance with her in the 
bower, 

O sun, O moon, what voice, what words, what 
note of song, what harp of many tongues can speak 
the horrors that then filled the perturbed spirit of 
the bewildered Mara ! 

In such a state did her eye dart into the inmost of 
the soul of Aongus, whilst her voice did pierce his 
ear with the fell sound, 

" Of comfort let not Aongus think to taste from 
this time forth for ever more. No virgin day will 
the unhappy Aine see again ! the father hath de- 
stroyed his child !" 

To the spot whereon he stood was Aongus fixed, 
his vacant eyes dwelt on the earth, a while from the 
passages of his heart, whence every drop of blood 
seemed to have downward streamed quite through 
his nether frame did issue forth a hollow sound. 



OF ERI. 441 

" No more of comfort, nor of aught but grief brim- 
ful of despair will Aongus ever taste ! If Mara would 
withhold the dismal tidings from my Aines ear; and 
stay and hide with her, and soothe her sorrowed 
heart my child is guiltless of the horrid deed !" 

And Mara said, " Aine shall be the only care of 
Mara now." 

And Aongus hasted to Teacmor, and shut himself 
up within the house. 

Now the fulness of the time had come, and woe- 
pined Aine did bring forth a child, a son. 

And Aongus did send Leotar, the steward of his 
house, to fetch the child ; and he did bid, let it be 
taken to Binneider straight, and there committed to 
the merciless sea. 

But the waves more kind, took pity on the inno- 
cent babe, and he was saved ; and coming to be 
known by the apparel of his little skiff, he was taken 
to Teacmor. 

And when the melancholy Aongus heard of what 
had happed, he sent unto the Ard Cruimtear to as- 
semble many priests, and he did tell these things in 
the priests' ears, and he did add, " What will the 
servants of the mighty Baal declare?" 

And Ard Cruimtear said, " Let the babe be hither 
brought, and let the king depart, and when the 
priests shall hear the words of Baal they will speak 
them in the father's ear." 
And so it was. 

And now was Aongus called to hear the words of 
Baal, Ard Cruimtear oped his mouth, and he did 
say, 

" Born of earth, loathed of its parents, Feadac 



442 CHRONICLES 

thence named, torn from the bosom, as it sucked the 
pap, thrown to the savage sea, heaved from ocean's 
huge back rejected ly upon the land, let the pure in- 
fant be restored to the sure shelter of a mother's 
arms, no longer Feadac but Fearmar called. 

" It may be so that one from the loins of e'en this 
hitherto abandoned child, may rule the sea and land 
where Gaal now dwell, of whom we nothing know, 
and who ne'er heard of us. 

" Thus doth JBaals-dy, thus let be done." (a) 

And Aongus did send the child to Aine, and she 
did press him to her throbbing breast ; and Aine and 
Mara did dwell with Litta in the tents of Cormac. 

And when Aongus had ruled seven rings, Nias 
king in Mumain died, and Adamair his son was 
chosen. 

And when Eocaid king in Ullad had ruled seven 
rings, he died; and Ruidruide the son of Ros, from 
Fomar the son of Airgeadmair, was chosen. 

And when Ruidruide had ruled two rings, he took 
his departure from Aodmagnmaca for the land of 
Cruithentuat, and three moons were passed through 
ere he returned. 

And as the king sat in his chamber in Aodmagn- 
maca, Tuigseac, even I, Ard Olam of Ullad, nigh 
unto him, he did say unto me, 

Two moons passed whiles 1 sojourned with the 
Feotar, and I did note the men, they are nothing 
like the children of our Eri. 

" We be subtle, our tongues do run contrary quite 
unto our thoughts, the men of Eri are as the waters 
of the mountain brook, now on the instant swelled 



OF ERI. 443 

beyond their banks, and now subsided e'en beneath 
the larger pebbles of their bed. 

" The men of Eri, I have marked them, Tuigscac, 
are uncertain as the air, superficial as the shadow, 
they are touched with pity exquisite, e'en at the 
hearing of a tale of woe, yet will they do a deed 
more cruel than that they weeped at the bare men- 
tion of, time but passed by. 

" The Cruitnig are the reverse of us in every thing, 
they are growing strong, now swelling to a mighty 
host; they are as one, they war not with their fel- 
lows. 

" They tell how their great fathers came forth a 
land encompassed with waters on every side, and 
traversed woods and swamps, and the Gaal from time 
to time did still keep moving on towards the going 
of the sun, till those in the days of Eocaid the me- 
lancholy reached the limits of that land, and passed 
the sea, and hither came, as the chronicles do tell. 

" But when or how things happed they little know, 
having no means of noting times ; their ignorance is 
great ; they are fierce, and terrible, and brave. Eri 
should keep a watchful eye, least that the Feotar do 
trouble her sore." 

Ullad is in peace and contentment; Ruidruide 
walketh in the steps of his race, he nourisheth the 
spirit of the youth. 

Oldanmact and Ullad are as one. 

And now times passed, and the boy Fearmargrew 
unto a man : he is beloved of Aongus more than Eunda 
whom Aine the daughter of Aongus prince of Lai- 
gean bore unto him. 

And Aongus brought Fearmar to Aodmagnmaca, 



444 CHRONICLES 

and he did present him to Ruidruide, and he did 
obtain for him a portion of land in the country of 
Feargneat, and he did tarry at Aodmagnmaca. 

And Aongus returned to Teacmor, and he died 
there, having ruled one score and twelve rings. 

(a) From this child, Fearmar, is descended the present king of 
England, as shall be regularly traced through the progress of this 
history. 



CHAP. XX. 

The reign of Conal, a space of Jive rings, from 99 

to 94. 

CONAL the son of Eadisceol the son of Feargus, 
was chosen king of Laigean, and he was chosen 
Ardri. 

Now the mind of Adamair king in Mumain was 
evil towards Conal, for his desire was towards the 
throne. 

And when Conal had ruled for the course of five 
rings, and the assembly was on Tobrad, Adamair did 
conspire against him, and he did move the warriors 
towards Teacmor. 

And Ardri did meet the host of Mumain on the 
plain of Almuin, there was the battle fought, and 
there did Conal fall, having ruled for five rings. 



OF ERI. 445 

CHAP. XXL 

The reign of Adamair, of the race oflber, a space of 
seven rings, from 94 to 87. 

ADAMAIR the son of Nias, from Adamair of the 
race of /for, tarried not, but moved to Teacmor, and 
raised up his tents on Tobrad, and was chosen 
Ardri. 

Eunda the son of Aongus Tuirmeac having been 
chosen king in Laigean. 

When Ruidruide had ruled one score rings and 
nine, Tuigseac died, and Treinleor was chosen Ard 
Olam of Ullad. 

And Eunda had a free and generous heart to all 
save Ardri, he never ceased to trouble Adamair. 

And he did strive to move Ruidruide against him, 
in vain; yea, Ruidruide reproved him sharply. 

Still he desisted not, howbeit the men of Laigean 
would not be able to prevail against the warriors of 
Mumain* were not chiefs of that land adhering to the 
race of Duac. 

And these do lead the mightiest of all the warriors 
of Mumain. 

Now Adamair was of a turbulent and uneven spi- 
rit, and he did carry his hand high towards the 
nobles of Mumain 9 friends of Eunda, and Eunda did 
conspire with them against him. 

And ere Adamair was aware, Eunda rose up 
against him ; and Adamair gathered together those 
he could, and he tarried not, but moved towards 
him. 



446 CHRONICLES 

And he bad the heralds say, in the hearing of 
Eunda, " Let Eunda shew his face into Adamair in 
the presence of the Gaal" 

But Eunda followed not the steps of the heralds. 

And the warriors fought; but those who stood 
round Ardri were too few, not one for one score, yet 
did Adamair fight whilst he could raise his hand. 

And darkness did spread itself when he was borne 
to his tent, and ere Baal came forth on the morrow, 
Adamair was no more. 

And his heap was raised over the tent whereon he 
lay in death, his death-song chaunted, and the war- 
riors raised the war-song of the king. 

Having ruled for the course of seven rings. 



CHAP. XXII. 

The reign of Eunda Aine the son of Aongus Tuir- 
meac, from Duac of the race o/^Iolar, a space of 
ten rings, from 87 to 77. 

ADAMAIR being no more, the princes and nobles 
of Mumain did chuse his son Enadamair to rule that 
land. 

And Eunda the son of Aongus king in Laigean, 
\vas seated on the throne of Eri. 

He exceeded all the kings of Eri aforetime in 
magnificence, he was profuse, and over and above 
he did wink at the transgressions of those under him; 
and when complaints came to his ear he did protect 
those that should be punished. 

And he did suffer the oppression of the princes of 
the line of Gialcad. 



OF ERI. 447 

Now Eunda being on the wrong path did scorn 
as it were to turn back ; in the stead of giving con- 
tentment by doing what was right, he sought to win 
men's hearts by largess, till means did lack, then did 
many of those whom he had raised fall off; they did 
set an higher value on the promise the performance 
yet to come, than on favours which had been con- 
ferred : and promises of mighty things did bold Cri- 
omtan, of GialcacFs line, give unto all who would 
accept his words. 

Now Criomtan had taken Beria, a daughter of 
Aongus, a prince of Mumain. 

And when Eunda had ruled for ten rings, and the 
messengers had gone forth to call the assembly of 
Eri to the high chamber of Teacmor, and the Fir- 
cios were moving through the land, they did deal 
with rigour ; they said, " We'll take the number, 
find them where we may." 

And Criomtan did speak unto the king, but he 
was deaf, or else. 

And Criomtan raised his voice, the sound whereof 
did pass from ear to ear through half of Eri ; and 
the land did bear the warrior's foot. 

And the hosts, led by Eunda and Criomtan, did 
meet on Cluan Daire, the pomp of Eunda served 
him not ; it was a fearful day, many were slain, and 
with them Eunda fell, having ruled for the circuit of 
ten rings. 



<48 CHRONICLES 



CHAP. XXIII. 

The reign o/X'riomtan the son of Felimid, the son 
of Eoca\d,from Melga the son o/'Gialcad, of the 
line oflolar, a space of three rings, from 77 to 74. 

THE messengers had gone forth, and when the as- 
sembly were together, Criomtan, who had been chosen 
king in Laigean, was chosen Ardri. 

And Criomtan moved towards Mumain, after the 
manner of the warrior, though he did make pretence 
of the chase, and he raised jealousy in the minds of 
the princes and nobles of Mumain and of Laigean, 
one against the other. 

Now Ruidruide had ruled in Ullad for the course 
of two score anrl five rings : what though he was 
stored with wisdom equal to any of the race, and did 
nourish the spirit of the youth within the schools, 
yet did he fan the fire of the warrior. He delighted 
in the chase, in music, and the dance, and sports ; 
and he had the sons of the nobles instructed accord- 
ing to the rules of Seadna, for he said, as Seadna said 
afore, " 'Twere good the youth were taught the ways 
of war, though they may never step herein." 

And the noise of the movements of Criomtan being 
wafted to the king of Ullad's ear, he did call toge- 
ther all the princes and nobles of the land to a 
chamber within Aodmagnmaca that he had builded 
up nigh unto the house of the king ; and the mes- 
sengers did add, " Let all the sons of Jhe nobles, 
who have put the open mantle on, come with their 



sires." 



OF ERI. 

And when the kings, and all the princes of the 
race, and all the nobles, were in the chamber, and 
all the youths did stand in a circle under the air, 

The king rose from the throne, and he did say, 

" When Calma did take his departure from Jber 
of our great fathers, he did choose companions of his 
way, and Ronaird followed the steps of the brother 
of his blood, the friend of his heart. 

"What if Bresail Rig-Damna be as Calma, and 
Niel as Ronaird; and they and their seven brethren 
do choose out from amongst the youths of the no- 
bles of the land, each nine youths, to be companions 
of their steps through the rugged and uneven ways 
of war?" 

And it was so. 

And the nine sons of the king did go forth, and 
they did choose nine of the youth. 

And when they were chosen, Ruidruide, and all 
the princes of the race, and the nobles of the land, 
came forth, and the circle being formed, Ruidruide 
stood up in the midst, and said, 

" Long time hath passed since Ullad gave or felt 
the stroke of battle : what though the mind of Ullad 
be inclined to peace, Mumain and Laigean, at strife 
one with the other rather than be at rest, are ever 
ready to be one against this land if daring did not 
fear. 

" The Gaol of Cruithen is before ns, our people 
and their people go to and fro. The fall of those 
who hither came with Duac is thought of by the 
warriors of that land the work of Eri, though Ullad 
had no hand therein : moreover Aine, of whom one 

VOL. n. -2 G 



450 CHRONICLES 

half was of the Feotar, weigheth in the scale of 
Laigean. 

" Should war begin to growl and snarl, the princes 
stand too nigh unto each other, let them be scat- 
tered through the host ; and those now chosen fel- 
lows in the battle's rage, will stand on this side and 
on that of Ullad's king. 

" And that, for times to come, the youths may 
learn the art and trick of war, the book of Seadna 
for their guide, I will have builded up a school, that 
they may enter in three rings afore they put the open 
mantle on. 

" That this day's work may be a sure founda- 
tion for our strength to rest upon, let the king, and 
these companions of the king, now say aloud, in 
the presence of the sun, and moon, and all the 
stars, 

" And first, the king doth say, 

" He will not turn his face away, though three 
assail himself. 

" He will aid and comfort his companions in ? 
the calm of peace, his fellows in the storm of war. 

" He will protect the injured, and relieve the op- 
pressed." 

Thus said the king, his hand on high. 

And all raised up their hands, and swore e'en as, 
the king. 

And Maol chief of Ratbot said, " What name 
shall Ullad's champions bear ?" 

And the king said, 

" Let the companions of the king be called CLAN- 

NA RuiDRUlDE."(a) 



OF ERI. 45*1 

And all struck their shields, and shouted, " CLAN- 
NA RUIDRUIDE!" 

Now Criomtan ceased not to vex and trouble 
JLaigean and Mumain; his hand was ever on his 
sword ; he did glory in the name of Cosgrac.(b) 

And when he had carried himself in this sort for 
the course of three rings, ere the messengers had 
gone out to call the assembly to the high chamber of 
Teacmor, 

Men of Laigean, after the manner of Fir Cios> 
did enter into Ullad, and did drive away the cattle 
of the land : and words were sent thereof unto the 
king. 

And Ruidruide did send letters unto Criomtan, 
saying, 

" Hath Ardri been told that a spoil hath been 
taken from off the land of Ullad, called by the spoil- 
ers by the name of Cios ?" 

And Criomtan did answer by the mouth of the 
messenger, 

" The king doth know thereof." 

And Ruidruide did send again a messenger with 
letters, and these are the words thereof: 

" Let Ardri answer in the high chamber of T&- 
acmor when the men of Ullad shall utter words of 
him." 

And Ruidruide did send an herald with a mes- 
senger, to say in the hearing of Criomtan, 

" When Ruidruide shall go toward Teacmor, the 
warriors of Ullad shall follow his thither steps." 

And Criomtan answered nought unto the messen- 
ger, unto the herald he did say, scoffingly, " Is the 
withered branch from the root of Er sprouting?' . 

2c 2 



452 CHRONICLES 

Now noise for the preparation of war was loud 
through Ullad and through Eri. 

And Usgar chief of Oldanmact called together the 
host, and he did send to Aodmagnmaca, to know 
when and whither they were to move. 

And Ruidruide did answer unto Usgar, 

" Let Usgar and the nobles of Oldanmact move 
to Tobrad, there to meet Ruidruide'' 

And Criomtan did speed to assemble the warriors, 
and all that moved did gather together on Magnas, 
and they did direct their steps towards Ullad. 

And the warriors of Ullad had , passed over the 
waters of the Huidaman, and the half of one day 
therefrom, when the host of Mumain and of Laigean 
were espied. 

And the men of Mumain did skip sportively to- 
wards the battle, but such as were not hurted re- 
turned in haste. 

And when the warriors drew nigh unto each other, 
Ruidruide bad the herald say aloud, 

" Let Criomtan advance, and feel if the arm of 
the withered branch of the stock of Er sprouteth." 

And when Criomtan heard the words, he sprung 
as the greyhound on his prey. 

Ruidruide was on his horse Mactire, aforetime 
called Tonn,(c) until a day on which the king did 
chase a wolf, and struck him dead with the spear of 
a man of the Gaal of Feotar, from the back r.f the 
horse : therefore was Tonn called Mactire. (d) 

And when Ruidruide saw Criomtan upon his feet, 
he came down from his horse, and he said, 

" What though my eye hath looked upon my arm 
now threescore and fifteen rings, it shall not be said 



OF ERI. 453 

in times to come, a son of Er took odds of any 



man." 



And Clanna Ruidruide looked on the king. 

And they fought; Criomtan with desperate fury 
beside his judgment, Ruidruide with the prudence 
of the warrior. 

And Criomtan fell into the arms of death. 

And Ruidruide bad all the heralds say aloud, 

" The transgressor hath paid the Eric of his fault ; 
let all move for Teacmor? 

Criomtan ruled for three rings, and he is called 
Cosgrac. 

NOTES TO CHAPTER XXIII. 

(a) This order of Clanna Ruidruide is the origin of the baronets 
created by James the First of England. 

(b) Cosgrac means victorious, but implies, that the victor delighted 
in slaughter. 

(c) Term means a wave. 

* (d M,,ctire, the son of the land, means a uolf. 



CHAP. XXIV. 

The reign of Ruidruide Mor, king o/*Ullad, Ardri, 
a space of seven rings, from 74 to 07. 

THE host of Ullad rolled as a wave till it reached 
to Tobrad. And they raised up their tents in the 
plain beneath, for Ruidruide said, " Let none armed 
stand on the hill." 

And Eri called loudly on Ruidruide to take the 



454 CHRONICLES 

throne : but he said, " Nay the seat of the king of 
Laigean is yet enip'ty ; few of the nobles fell, Ruid- 
ruide did stay the hand of the warriors." 

And Easamon Aine the son of Eunda, the son of 
Aongus Tuirmeac was chosen king in Laigean. 

Now when Baal had been two nights in the last 
chamber of his house Fluicim, the assembly of Eri 
were together, and Ruidruide the king of Ullad was 
chosen Ardri with acclamation. 

And ere he had seated himself on the throne, the 
heralds said, 

" Ard Cruimtear stand eth at the entrance of the 
high chamber of Teacmor to conduct Ardri to Lia~ 
Jail? 

And Ruidruide said, 

" Words are written in the book of Eocaid Olam 
Fodla, from whom Ruidruide is sprung, 

" Memory of two things doth pain my mind 

" The fall of Noid, and that I did sit on Lia- 
fail. When the mention of these twain be coupled 
with my name in time to come, as they will be, let 
the tongue also add my youth thereto. 

" Since which time his sons have not gone forth to 
Liafail, nor will Ruidruide" 

And he added moreover unto Bresail his son, 

" Go forth unto the priests, and bid them to the 
feast." 

And great was the joy on Tolirad, and all around, 
for that a prince of the race of Er sat on the throne 
of Eri. 

And when the assembly took their departure, Ar~ 
dri moved towards Aodmagnmaca, leaving Bresail 
Rig-Damna in Teacmor. (a) 



OF ERI. 455 

Now Ros the son of Ruidruide had taken Alita 
the daughter of Usgar chief of Oldanmact ; and Ros 
did go to Usgar, that he may conduct him to Aod- 
magnmaca, what time the king, princes, and nobles, 
and all the assembly of Ullad shall be together. 

And as they sat in the chamber in Aodmagnmaca, 
Ruidruide rose, and said, 

" Two hundred and one score and eighteen rings 
have been completed since Aodmagnmaca hath been 
builded up by Ciombaot and Maca: from the day 
that she did cease, the sons of Er have not dwelled 
on Tobrad, leaving Mumain and Laigean to move to 
and fro, as passion swayed ; howbeit, the hawk dif- 
fereth not more widely from the owl, than the children 
oflber andlo/ar. 

" The sons of Her are vain without thought, they 
delight jin music and the dance; wisdom hath no 
charms for them, yet are they brave and generous, 
and full of wit 

" The sons of lolar are dark, full of deceit ; they 
think for that lolar ruled Enmionn, Eri should be 
theirs for ever. 

* f In Laigean the Cruimtear is above the king. 

" In Mumain the bard and minstrels, yea, the 
dancing-master lead, whither all do follow. 

" A prince of Mumain asked of me one day, if 
Cruiten Tuat lay not beyond Oldanmact ; nor doth 
one of Laigean better know, though they have more 
art to guard their tongue. 

" Had not Oldanmact stood firm with Ullad, long 
since would Eri have been under tribute to the goo'd 
liking of the sons of Iolai\ 



456 CHRONICLES 

" Easamon hath taken a daughter of the Feotar : 
should Easamon and Brandt join themselves toge- 
ther, Ullad will be between two foes ; therefore let 
Ullad and Oldanmact look to themselves betimes. 

" What if the chief and eight of the nobles of the 
Danan should sit amongst the princes and nobles of 
Ullad even here, and hold talk, and hold up then- 
hand ?" 

And it was so. 

And the king said, " Let the heralds direct the 
steps of Usgar hither ward." 

And Ruidruide did meet Usgar at the door of the 
chamber, and he d?d conduct him to a seat that 
had been placed for him opposite the seat of the king 
on the other side of the table. 

And the secretary did repeat the words of Ruid- 
ruide, touching the chief and nobles of the Danan. 

And Usgar rose, and said, 

" The heart of Usgar will bear this mark of favour 
whilst his memory shall endure." 

And the words of the law were set down to be of 
the custom of Tainistact. 

And the words of the writings were read day after 
day ; and the assembly did not depart for one moon. 

And Clanna Ruidruide did assemble, and they did 
move as the hunter, and the warrior, according to the 
rules of Seadna. 

And Ruidruide preserved Eri in peace, the words 
of the roll of the laws were his guide in every step 
he moved. 

And when he had ruled in wisdom, in justice, and 
in valour, for the circuit of two score and fifteen 



OF ERI. 457 

rings, of which he sat on the throne of Eri for the 
course of seven rings, he sickened, and died. 

And his heap is raised in Cluaneic, nigh unto the 
heap of Airgeadmair, near Dun Sobairce, according 
to his words. 

And Ullad doth mourn for him, calling him liuid- 
ruide Mor. (K) 

NOTES TO CHAPTER XXIV. 

(a) Rig-Damna was the title applied to the prince named by a 
reigning chief to succeed him, but it did not follow that he was to 
succeed ; he must be chosen according to law on the death of the 
king, and he was frequently set aside. The meaning of the term is, 
*' the materials for a king." 

(b) This is my name, translated to Roger. 



CHAP. XXV. 

The reign of Enadamair, king in Mumain, Ardri, a 
space of three rings, from 67 to 64. 

WHEN tidings reached to Teacmor that Ruidruide 
was like to die, Bresail Rig-Damna hasted to Aod* 
magnmaca; and when the princes and nobles of Ullad 
came together, he was chosen. 

And Enadamair did come to Aodmagnmaca, and 
he did speak unto Bresail touching Easamon king in 
Laigean, and he did disclose to Bresail his wish to 
sit on the throne of Eri. 

And Bresail said unto him, " According to the 
wish of Enadamair, so be it." 

And Enadamair was chosen Ardri, and ruled for 
three rings, when he ceased. 



458 CHKO'fc 1CLES 

CHAP. XXVI 

The reign o/ 1 Bresail, king in Ullad, Arclri, for the 
space of nine rings, from 64 to 55. 

JuUGAD the son of Enadamair was chosen king in 
Mumain. 

And Bresail the son of Ruidruide Mor was chosen 
Ardri. 

And when he had ruled for the course of one ring, 
Trein Leor died, and Muintear was chosen Ard Olam 
of Ullad. 

The whole of the time of Bresail, Eri was in 
peace. 

Nevertheless the Gaol were distressed for the num- 
ber of cattle that died by disease, not in Ullad only, 
but throughout Eri, insomuch that Bresail suffered 
not Cios to be taken for Ardri. 

And when he had ruled Ullad twelve rings, of 
which he ruled, Ardri, nine rings, he died. 



CHAP. XXVII. 

The reign of Lugad, the son of Enadamair, a space 
of twelve rings, from 55 to 43. 

GONGAL the son of Bresail was chosen king in 
Ullad. 
And Lugad king in Mumain was chosen Ardri. 



^ OF ERI. 459 

He had taken Masica a daughter ofCriomtan, some 
time Ardri. 

And rumour ran through Eri, that a covenant 
was between the sons of Iber and lolar, that they 
should rule, Ardri, now of one, now of another, for 
ever. 

And the covenant was made, as it was said, be- 
cause of the sitting of the Danan in the assembly of 
Ullad. 

And when Lugad had sat on the throne five rings, 
and the assembly were on Tobrad, Congal did coai- 
m une with Lugad, in the hearing ofmeMuintear, and 
he did say unto him, 

" Beware of the talons of the eagle: son of Marcac, 
put not thy trust in an eye of seeming." 

But Lugad said, " The heart of the brave should 
not entertain fear, nor yet suspicion, invite them who 
may." 

And Congal held his peace. 

And there was friendship between Mumain and 
Laigean all the days of twelve rings that Lugad 
lived ; then he did die, having drank water from the 
spring whilst he was heated in the chase. 



CHAP. XXVIII. 

The reign of Congal king in Mumain, a space of six 
rings, from 43 to 37. 

CAIR BRE the brother of Lugad was chosen king 
in Mumain. 



46*0 CHRONICLES 

And Congal king in Ullad was chosen Ardri 

And when he had ruled one ring, Muintear died, 
and Melts was chosen Ard Olam of Ullad. 

Now words came to the ear of Congal, saying, 

" Suin the son of Oilhol Aron, the son of Fear- 
mar, the son of Aongus by Eithne his daughter, is 
acting craftily, and with deceit." 

And the words were of such sort as were fitting 
to be told in the hearing of the assembly of Ullad. 

And the messengers were sent out. 

And when the assembly were together, Congal rose, 
and said, 

" The chief of largael hath words for the ear of 



And Felimid rose, and said, 

" On a day came Suin son of Oilliol Aron to the 
tents of Felimid. 

" And he did eat, and drink, and was in mirth, 
and he did say, ' If Felimid would come unto the 
land of Sum. 9 

" And thither Felimid did go, and he did abide 
for some few days and nights ; and he did go to 
hunt, and he did fish within the waters of that land. 
And Suin did speak in pieces, and in halves, unt*. 
my ear." 

Here Felimid paused for a while, and Aod chief 
of Larne rose, and said, 

" Doth Felimid ponder ere he tells aloud the se- 
cret whispers of false Suins tongue?" 

And Felimid looked upon Aod, then turned his 
eye towards the king, and said, 

".Should Felimid forget himself so much, as here 
to tell aloud the words of Sum, or of any man, whilst 



OF ERI. 461 

lie did sit at Felimid's board, or Felimid did abide 
with him beneath the covering of his booth, reposing 
in the confidence of hospitality, when mouths and 
ears were open, and our hearts were free. 

" What though the ear of Aod may delight to hear 
the crafty Sums words at such a time, in such a 
place, would Aod, would Ullad's king, think his words 
safe in Felimid's ear, or of one of Felimid 's race, for 
times to come ? 

" The lessons that my father taught me, and I have 
learned in Mur Olamain, and all that I have seen or 
heard, do shew and tell me, never to prove false 
to any one, therefore Felimid must not repeat these 
words. 

" What though? Yet did Sum speak unto me 
words, the substance of which Felimid will tell, 
though all the very words he cannot say in full : could 
Felimid keep those clasped within his lips, he should 
think as poorly of himself, as were he to give out 
what else. 

" On a day, Bresail the king did speak in wrath 
unto my father, ' The king hath ceased, Doncad is no 
more.' Let the cause pass, more than to say, Bresail 
did, after a while, take Doncad by the hand, and he 
did say, ' Can Doncad forget the words of Bresail? 
All men do err many a time and oft ; Bresail is but a 
man' no more of that. 

" It was noised wide, that the king bore Doncad 
hard in hand : his words to Doncad reached not 
beyond our tents, the harsh words only came to 
Suin's ear ; of them he spake to me, as we did ride 
together, having met by chance, to the tents of Clan- 
nadon. 



462 CHRONICLES 

" On that day did Suin say, * When Usgar shall 
die, Oldanmact will fall to Ros the son of Ruidruide 
Mor, who hath taken Alita, Usgar $ only child : then 
will the chamber of Aodmagnmaca be a kennel for the 
dogs of Ullad's kings. 

" * All JEris hopes rest on the sons of Erimionn. 
If Felimid and chiefs of Ullad of his friends would 
hold discourse with Sums self, that he may say to 
Easamon and Cairbre, The bravest of the chiefs of 
Ullad are content that Suin shall rule in Oldanmact 
when Usgar die. 

" ' Then shall Felimid, Suins friend, have all Mag 
Geinter to his race for evermore, and all the sons of 
Erimionn will confirm the words.' 

" And when Suin did make an end of all he said 
in this same sort, 

" I answered then, 

" Felimid will repeat false treacherous Suins words 
in CongaFs ear. 

" And so he did. 

" And Congal bad, ' When Ullad shall together 
be in Aodmagnmaca^ even here, Felimid will tell all, 
it is fit he should/ 

" And so he hath." 

And Aod chief of Larne rose, and said, " Felimid 
is worthy to be chief of Taoscars race." 

And they held talk. 

And Felimid said, " What if Suin be called to 
answer to the words of Felimid even here ?" 

And it was so. 

And the messengers were sent: and when Suin 
read the words, he said, " Suin will answer in the 



OF ERI. 463 

high Chamber of^Teacmor on Tobrad. Suin is a prince 
of Erimionn" 

But this was vain talk, and contrary quite to the 
words of Tainistact, for that Geinter was within the 
portion of Er from the beginning, therefore was he 
under UllacTs laws : but Suin did make sure of his 
escape, if the words were heard in the high chamber 
of Teacmor. 

And when Suin heard that words had passed 
to bring him in, not having answered to the heralds 
when they called his name, he fled from the land of 
Aron into Laigean, and I) egad his son came to Con- 
gal to intercede for his father. 

And Congo! said unto Degad, in the presence of 
me Metis, " No words have been spoken of thee, De- 
gad; wouldst thou that I spake evil of the father in 
the hearing of his son ? Let not my silence, therefore, 
bear the construction, that thy father shall be free : 
what remaineth to be done doth rest with the assem- 
bly of Uttad, the king sayeth not." 

And Congal treated the young man with tender- 
ness ; he did tarry a few days at Aodmagnmaca ; 
and when he took his departure, the king said unto 
me, 

" Melis, if my eye and my ear deceive not HJy 
judgment, Degad hath not been outdone in subtlety 
by Sum, nor by one of the race of lolar." 

The thoughts of Congal were just, Degad did 
work artfully towards all, even his father, whose 
mind he filled with fear, with the design of prevent- 
ing his return to the land of Ullad. 

Now words came to the ear of Cvngal, that Suin 
dwelt in Mumain with Cairbre, the king of that land, 



464 CHRONICLES 

and a messenger was sent to Cairbre with letters, 
saying, 

" Cairbre doth not know of the evil practices of 
Suin in Ullad, for which he hath been called to an- 
swer, or he would not suffer him to dwell in Mum- 



ain." 



And the messenger returned with the words of 
Cairbre: 

" The friend of Cairbre shall repose in safety under 
the covering of his tent: whoso disturbeth Suin, 
inaketh Cairbre his foe." 

And Congal assembled the Clanna Ruidruide; 
and he bad the chiefs to call together the warriors : 
he did not send to Laigean, nor yet to Oldanmact. 

And the king sent an herald to the tents of Cairbre, 
saying aloud, 

" The warriors of Ullad will follow the steps of 
the herald to bring in Suin" 

And they moved to the south, and Cairbre assem- 
bled the host of Mumain. 

And the men of Mumain and the men of Ullad 
saw each the other in Cluain^Tuam, and those of 
Ullad hurted those of Mumain sorely. 

And Cairbre fell by the sword ofCuir, the son of 
Ardfear chief of Ratbot of the Clanna Ruidruide: 
and Cuir bare away the sword and shield of Cairbre, 
but Suin fled. 

And when the men of Mumain found that Suin 
had escaped after the fall of Cairbre, and that Suin 
still lived by flight, the hearts of the people were 
turned away from Suin, he sickened, and died. 

And Congal and the warriors of Ullad returned 
to Aodmagnmaca: and the sword and shield of 



OF ERI. 465 

Cairbre were hung up in the hall of Clanna Ruid- 
ruide, beneath the shield of the son of the chief ol 
Ratbot ; but Congo! would not suffer more than 
the voice of praise to Cuir ; no noise, nor shouting 
was heard. 

And Duac the son of Cairbre was chosen king in 
Mumain. 

Now Congal went to Teacmor, and he dwelt there- 
in : and Factna the son of Cas the son of Ruidruide 
Mor, sat for the king in Ullad. 

And long while had not passed after Cairbre fell, 
and Sum died, till Degad the son of Suin began to 
trouble the land of Ullad ; and the doings of Degad 
were told to Factna. 

And when the mind of Degad had suspicion that 
he was discovered, whilst he yet tarried to be certain 
that his fear was just, a messenger came from Ardri 
to Factna, saying, 

" Let the heralds be sent to the land of Aron, and 
let them say aloud, 

" Let not Degad, nor one of the race of lolar, nor 
of the children of Laigean, be found within Ullad 
what time Baal shall have passed through one ratha 
of his this ring's course, their substance with them on 
their way." 

And thus was Degad driven out of Ullad, with all 
his race. 

And Degad moved to Mumain, where he was re- 
ceived with kindness by Duac. 

And when Degad was gone forth from Ullad, ti- 
dings were brought unto Factna of sayings, yea, and 
doings of Degad to pull down Er and set up Eri- 
mionn of his ovvn race. 

VOL II. 2 H 



466 CHRONICLES 

And Congo! sent a messenger unto Duac with 
letters, saying, 

" Let Duac yield up Degad to answer his mani- 
fold transgressions, as it is said." 

And Duac answered by the hand of the messen- 
ger of Congal, 

" What though Cairbre the father of Duac hath 
fallen for Suin, let Duac perish ere he desert Degad 
his friend in the hour of his distress." 

And Ardri sent another messenger unto the tents 
of Duac, saying, 

" Let Duac and Degad answer in the high cham- 
ber of Teacmor unto Ardri, why he hath refused to 
yield up Degad" 

And when the assembly were together, and the 
feasts were passed, 

Ardri rose, and said ; 

" When Suin, of the race of lolar from Aongus 
Tuirmeac, did practise against Ullad, and he was 
called to answer, he fled to Mumain, and Cairbre did 
protect him to the loss of his own life. 

" When Degad the son of Suin was called to an- 
swer, Duac the son of Cairbre sendeth words, ' Duac 
will not desert his friend.' 

" Doth it not seem hard that Cairbre or Duac 
should be troubled for their generosity? Is it not 
harder still that the Gaol of Eri shall be called from 
repose to slaughter? How much more afflicting, 
that any should soar above the law. 

" Were Degad present, Congal would say, Did 
Suin offend nine times, Devad hath transgressed 
nine fold nine times ; and when he hath been called 
to answer, the king of Mumain saith, 



OF ERI. 467 

" ' Degad is my friend, and I will shield him against 
all censure.' 

44 Degad is not present ; if he were, Congal would 
say, that he is much deceived if he doth not prove as 
false to the race of Iber as he and his race have done 
to the sons of Er" 

And Ardri said moreover, 

" Let Duac answer, Is not Degad in the tents of 
Duac, and hath not he refused to yield him up ?" 

And Duac said, 

" Degad dwelleth in the tents of Duac, and Duac 
will defend all that take refuge therewithin." 

And Ardri rose, and said, 

" Once hath the host of Ullad been compelled to 
unhook the sword, that the laws may be enforced, 
and to move from one extremity of Eri to the other 
extremity thereof, to the no small charge of the chil- 
dren of that land, who give unto the warrior his re- 
ward. 

" And Cairbre hath lost his life, and many of the 
nobles and of the Gaal have been destroyed. 

" Yet Duac abideth in his perverse way, and re- 
fuseth submission, calling his disobedience to the 
laws of Eri by the name of respect for the laws of 
friendship and of hospitality. 

" Such is the estimation in which Congal holdeth 
these last named laws, the first in use; he will once 
more inquire of Duac if he will render Degad to an- 
swer to the law of Eri." 

And Duac said, " Duac will protect Degad to the 
utmost/* 

When Ardri, still standing, said, 



468 CHRONICLES 

" It hath been done in Eri, not by the kings of 
Ullad, that a spoil hath many a time been taken, and 
tribute hath been exacted, the consent of the assem- 
bly not had therefor. 

" What though it hath ofttimes happened, that a 
breach hath been opened for a custom to creep in, 
which, coiling itself, slumbereth and darteth out, as 
power directeth, till it gain the force of law, if might 
can avouch the wrong. 

" One sprung from Eocaid OlamFodla, the just 
lawgiver, and who feeleth within him a portion of the 
spirit of that wise man, will not suffer his wrath to 
subdue his reason, and so stray from the words of 
the law. 

" And as Duac hath declared in the hearing of Eri, 
that he will protect Degad, Congo! sayeth aloud, he 
will protect the laws, else why sitteth he one step 
higher than his brethren of the race? 

" And as it is fitting that the charge fall on the trans- 
gressor, and only upon him, 

" What if Duac pay tribute three thousand cows, 
till he shall yield submission to the laws?" 

And Duac was put to confusion, and to silence. 

And the words were set down. 

And all the writings were read day after day, and 
none stood on Tobrad for justice, and the assembly 
separated. 

And in one moon, Easamon king in Laigean died, 
and Roigne his son was chosen. 

And Congal returned to Aodmagnmaca, and Fact- 
na dwelleth on Tobrad. 

The times are dark and heavy, what though Duac 



OF ERI. 469 

was the friend of Degad, he was the most gloomy 
of all the race of Iber because of his mother, it was 
said she was of lolar. 

And now the season came for Duac to send the 
tribute: and when it was not sent, a messenger went 
to the king of Mumain, saying, 

" Why hath not the tribute been sent to Tobrad, 
according to the words in the high chamber of Te- 
acmor ?" 

And the messenger was told by Degad, " All the 
cattle are not born yet, the oldest cannot move so 
far." 

And when the words came to Congal, he called 
together all the warriors, and ere Duac was aware 
the host was in motion ; and when they had reached 
as far as Eaden Dair, the chief of Oir and a com- 
pany met them, and told that the kine were before 
the drivers on the way to Teacnior. 

And Congal bad, that the cattle should be driven 
to the dwelling of Scandt chief of Oldanmact. 

Arid the host of Ullad returned. 

And so in the ring that next did come. But when 
the time did come about again, Degad yet abiding 
in Mumain, and the tribute was not sent, Duac an- 
&wered to the messenger, 

" The substance of Duac shall be no longer wasted 
on the friends of Congal? 

And words went through Ullad to assemble the 
warriors, and through Laigean to collect the host, 
to be gathered about Ardri on the plain of Ur- 
lann. 

To Scandt Ardri sent not; it being told unto 
him for a truth, and it was true, that Scandt did send 



470 CHRONICLES 

back all the cattle to Duac; for that the mind of 
Scandt was filled with jealousy of the sons of Er, be- 
cause of Alita the daughter of Usgar, whom Ros 
the son of Ruidruide Mor had taken. 

And Congal moved in his own strength : and when 
he had reached unto Urlann, the tents of one-half of 
one Catka of the warriors of Laigean were raised up 
on the plain. And the chief of Maglein said unto 
Congal, " The tents of Laigean are on the bearers ; 
if Ardri would move to the plain of Sith, and abide 
there till the host of Laigean shall be round him." 

And Ardri, in whose mind suspicion was not, 
did according to the words of the chief. 

And on the sixth day that Ardri was on Stih, as 
the scouts looked out, they espied the host of Mu~ 
main behind them, and those of Laigean before 
them. And the warriors of Ullad turned their faces 
towards the men of Mumain. 

Still did Congal stand what time the king of Lai- 
gean should come unto him : but Roigne was not 
with the host. 

And when the warriors of Ullad and of Mumain 
were face to face, the men of Laigean were on the 
backs of the men of Ullad; 

And the warriors of Ullad fought with their right 
hands against Mumain, and their left hands against 
Laigean. 

And Congal bad the heralds call on the name of 
Duac the transgressor; but Duac answered no.t. 
Wherever was the battle the hottest, there was Con* 
gal, till he fell, overthrown by the eleventh wound 
from the hand of one of the Gaal. 

Nor did the warriors give way, they fought, led by 



OF EKI. 47| 

Rosruad, the son of Ros, the son of Ruidruide Mor, 
a youth of the Clanna Ruidruide. 

And they did disengage themselves from between 
Mumain and JLaigean, and they drove them before 
them with a great slaughter. 

And they raised up their tents that night on the 
plain of Sithdruim. 

And they did raise the heap of the warriors slain 

And the host did stand round the form of Congal 
through the night, save the men of Ardtain, Ard 
Deas, and Larne ; they did watch beside the forms 
of their chiefs fallen in the battle. 

And words were heard, till they reached the ear of 
Ros, " Shall we not take off a spoil ?" And Ros 
bad the heralds say aloud, through all the host, 
" Men of Ullad, lay not thy hand upon the spoil." 

And it was so. 

And the form of the king, and of the chiefs that 
were slain, and all those hurted in the battle, were 
borne on the cars of war to Ullad. 

And the heap of Congal is raised at Aodmagn- 
maca nigh unto the heap of Aod. 

And his death-song was chaunted, and his war- 
song raised, the war-song for the king fallen in the 
battle, the first of the kings of Ullad since the fall 
of Airgeadmair, the circuits of three hundred and 
three rings. 

And Ullad mourneth for Congal, the wise, and 
just, and generous, calling him Cloirineac.(d) 

(a) Cloirmeac is, hospitable with abundance. 



472 CHRONICLES 



CHAP. XXIX. 

The reign of Duac king in Mumain, Ardn, a space 
of seven rings, from 37 to 30. 

Now Factna abided in Teacmor ; and when he 
heard that Congal was no more, he raised up his 
tents on Tobrad, and he sent a messenger unto 
Feargus, the son of Laid the son of Ruidruide Mor, 
saying, 

" Let the asion and mantle of Ardri be sent hither." 
And Feargus did come with the messenger, bearing 
the king's attire. 

And they were placed on the throne within the 
high chamber, and Factna gave the house of the king 
in charge of the high steward of Teacmor, and he and 
Feargus moved to Aodmagnmaca. 

And when the assembly of Ullad were together, 
Factna the son of Cos the son of Ruidruide Mor 
was chosen king in Ullad. 

And Duac king in Mumain was chosen Ardri. 

The king, and princes, and nobles of Laigean ad- 
hered to Duac because of Degad the son of Sum, 
the son of Fearmar, the son of OilliolAron, the son 
of Aongus Tuirmeac, from Leogaire of lolar. 

And Factna dwelleth in Aodmagnmaca. 

Now the mind of Scandt, and of the race of the 
chief of Danan, was evil towards Ullad, and they did 
not come to the assembly of the land. 

And Fionlaoc was chosen king in Laigean, in the 
place of Roigne his brother, what time Duac had 
been Ardri for the circuit of two rings. 



OF ERI. 473 

Now Roigne had ceased ere Baal had touched 
larsgith, and the king had not been chosen in Lai- 
gean, therefore the messengers of Eri went not forth 
to call the assembly to the high chamber of Teacmor, 
nor did Ardri abide therein. 

Thus the time of the meeting of the kings, princes, 
and nobles, chiefs of the Olam, heads of the people, 
and judges named, passed by, and Tobrad was void : 
of this Factna contented himself with the noting on 
the chronicles of Ullad. 

And when Duac had ruled for three rings, De- 
gad, having come to the age, Duac removed to 
Teacmor, placing Degad on the very seat of the 
king in Mumain. 

Now Scandt chief of Oldanmact had no child, and 
Degad had given Bocuila his sister to Allat of the 
race of the chiefs of the Danan. 

What though the eye of Oldanmact looked on the 
sons of Er, it was from beneath the half-raised lid of 
doubt and suspicion ; Degad did labour without 
ceasing to excite the nobles of Oldanmact against 
Ullad, setting all his designs in order ready for what 
time Scandt should cease. 

Fionlaoc king in Laigean was as of Iber, whatever 
Duac bad, that did Fionlaoc ; howbeit all that Dua*, 
said, did but pass from the mouth of Degad to the 
ear of Duac, and so through his lips. 

\Vhilst Duac did imagine he was hemming him- 
self in on every side, making himself secure of ruling 
Eri, he, and the race of Iber, for evermore ; every 
eye in Eri, save of Duac, saw that Degad was work- 
ing with all his art to raise up lolar to the destruc- 
tion of Iber. 



474 CHRONICLES 

Now Duac had ruled for the course of five rings, 
and the messengers went not forth to call the assem- 
bly to Teacmor. 

And what time Baal entered the threshold of his 
house Blat, in the ring that followled, Factna did 
call together the assembly of Ullad to Aodmagn- 
rnaca. 

And the king did send forth the heralds, saying, 
" Let the Clanna Ruidruide be in their hall what 
time the assembly shall be in the chamber of Aod- 
magnmaca" 

And when the assembly were together in their 
chamber, and the Clanna Ruidruide sat in their 
hall, 

The king rose, and said, 

" What though the chief and nobles of Oldanmact 
have not come hither according to the words of the 
messenger, this chamber sufficeth not, nor perhaps 
would it be fitting that the Clanna Ruidruide should 
enter herein, nor yet that the assembly should sit 
within the hall of Clanna Ruidruide. 

" Therefore what if the assembly of Ullad, and the 
Clanna Ruidruide do stand round the king on the 
mount of ArdScealact, as before the building of Aod- 
magnmaca, that all may hear the words of his lips, 
which ought to be many to answer to the doings of 
these times ?" 

And it was so. 

And boards were placed the height of one step 
above the ground for the foot of the king ; and all 
the princes of ~Er, and the nobles of Ullud, and the 
chiefs of the Olam, and heads of the people, and 
judges named, stood on one side of the king, and on 



OF ERJ. 475 

the other side stood Clanna Ruidruide t in the arms of 
the warrior ; all forming the eircle. 

And the king raised his voice, and said, 

" From the day that Maca, the daughter of Aod, 
the partner ofCiombaot, did cease, for the full course 
of two hundred one score and fifteen rings, till Ruid- 
ruide Mor did rule, Ardri, the sons of Er did dwell 
within Ullad, declining their eyes, though they could 
not stop their ears, from the sound of many tongues 
speaking of the slaughter of the nobles and the Goal 
of Mumain, and of Laigean, in the battle ; yea, of 
the murder of kings and princes of these lands, be- 
neath the covering of the tent, in the calm of 
peace. 

" And the sons of Laogaire, and the sons ofGial- 
cad have troubled one half of JSri; and nobles of 
Mumain have adhered to the sons of Laogaire be- 
cause ofAine of Coriat. 

" And as the prince of Ib Lugad moved, the one 
was now strong, now weak. 

" And thus it was till Aongus Tuirmeac did hither 
lead the youth Fearmar, the son of Aine, his un- 
happy child ; and here in Geinter was Ruidruide Mor 
prevailed upon, against the counsel of divers of this 
land, to suffer Fearmar to abide. 

" And Fearmar ceased, and Oilliol Aron ceased, 
his son, and after Suin came, whom many an eye 
that looketh here hath seen, as every ear hath heard 
what Suin said and did. 

"And when Suin was called to answer for these 
same, be fled, and Cairbre shielded him, for which 
brave Cairbre fell. 



476 CHRONICLES 

" And Degad the son ofSuin still did loiter in this 
land to perfect the mischief which his sire began. 

" And Factna, even I, did disclose unto Congal, 
UllacTs king, Ardri that was, the secret plottings of 
false Sums crafty son. 

"And then did Congal drive him and all of Lai- 
gean forth of Ullad's land, and unto Mumain Degad 
moved. 

"And Congal did send to have him yielded up 
according to the law, but Duac would protect the 
youth. 

" And Duac was forced to send three thousand 
kine, and these did Congal bad be driven to Oldan- 
mact, and Scandt did restore them by a secret way. 

" Then the third ring came, and Duac would nei- 
ther yield his friend nor yet the kine : and Congal 
moved to enforce the law ; and Roigne was false, 
and Congal fell by Laigeans two-edged sword. 

" And Duac a son of Iber Y \\\et\\ y Ardri, by favour 
of the race of lolar, and Degad of lolar doth rule in 
Mumain as though he were the king. 

" It is known to all that the race of lolar is subtle, 
and seek dominion, and for that lolar first did take 
upon himself the name of Erimionn, whilst all the 
sons of Iber 9 and our great father Er were yet 
in youth; they fancy none but they should rule 
Ardri. 

" The offshoot of their stock, that Ruidruide Mor 
did suffer to be planted in this soil, had not care 
been ta'en in time, might, with the help of Ibers 
hand, have grown to such a size as to o'ershadow 
Eri in a little while. 



OF ERI. 477 

.** And when for that reason Congal did tear it up 
by the root in Ullad, Cairbre and Duac did set it up, 
and nourish it in Mumain, holding the laws for 
nought. 

" And the mind of Laigean and of Mumain is one, 
and Oldanmact is now with them, therefore doth Ul- 
lad stand alone, without a friend save one, the roll 
of Eri's laws; have these not force enough, ill will 
it fare with the children of this land ; yea, and with 
Eri's self. 

" What time Duac hath sat Ardri for the circuit 
of two rings, the assembly have not been called to 
Teacmor, because, as it was said, of Roigne king in 
Laigearfs death, 

" Two rings are run, the messengers have not 
gone forth ; it is whispered that fear for Degad doth 
sway the mind of Duac ; he seeketh to decline his 
ear from what he thinketh would be said of him. 

"These are but whispers of deceitful tongues to 
credulous ears. 

" The eye that looketh far and wide and deeply 
into truth will see much more. Hath Duac the full 
cry of all the nations of Eri save of Ullad, why 
should he fear for Degad? Will not the storm of 
these silence the gentle breeze of Ullad's voice. This 
is not the cause; the race of lolar have desire to rule 
side way of the law, the hand of Iber helping them 
to shove it by. 

" Therefore, what if a messenger be sent unto Te- 
acmor, to say unto Ardri, 

" Let the kings and princes and nobles, and those 
for the Gaol be called to the high chamber of Teac- 
mor, according to the words on the roll of the laws?" 



478 CHRONICLES 

And all the assembly held up their right hands. 
And the king still standing, said, 
;< Let all abide in Aodmagnmaca, and hereabout 
till the messenger shall hither come again, and then 
we will hold talk." 

And the messengers did go, and they did return, 
bearing the answer ofArdri, and these are the words 
thereof, 

" What though Vllad be too narrow for the pride 
of Er t Factna must be content to abide therein. 
When Ardri needeth counsel, he will ask of those 
whom he doth will." 

And the assembly and Clanna Ruidruide were 
called together, and the words of Duac were repeated 
in their ears. 

And the king rose, and said, 
" Will Vllad submit that Eri should be ruled by 
one who sets up his will against the law ? 

" Or will the chiefs assemble the warriors, and 
pluck Duac from a throne which he is no longer fit 
to fill?" 

And the chief of Magmortiomna said, 
" What if Duac, the treacherous .murderer of Con- 
gal, were swept from the throne, and hidden from 
the eye of man ?" 
And the king said, 

" All the children of Er owe thanks unto the 
young chief of Magmortiomna, for the expression of 
his love for CongaL 

" When Breas shall reflect, he will be satisfied 
that his words were uttered with too much haste; 
Duac and Roigne did deal with craft, the course of 



OF ERI. 479 

the hunter, the steps of the warrior, are full of deceit 
and guile. 

" The death of Congal is not the offence that Ulr 
lad, speaking in the name of Eri, should avenge, 
Duac hath contemned the words of the law in the 
matter of Degad, and that contempt hath he con- 
firmed by refusing to call the assembly to the high 
chamber of Teacmor; for these must he atone. 

" With leave of Breas y the king of Ullad would be 
heard to say, 

" What if Duac be made to answer for his insult 
to the laws ?" 

And it was so. 

And the king said, " Let the chiefs gather together 
the warriors, let none remain behind, Ullad must 
move in all her strength." 

And of the priests came to the king, and whis- 
pered in his ear, " Will not the king suffer the priests 
to attend his steps, moving towards the battle?'' 

And the king answered, " Nay ; the priests speak 
in whispers with a false tongue, ye went between 
Suin and Laigean, and between Degad and Mum- 
am, and between Mumain and Laigean, and now ye 
seek by favour of my voice, to practise the deceit 
that lieth lurking in your hearts against the sons of 
Er. 

" Hear the words of JEocaid Olam Fodla y the just 
. awgiver : 

" ' Let the priests guard the fires, and mark the 
seasons.' 

" So saith Factna his son ' Priests, live in peace.' " 

Now Ardri prepared for battle, and heralds were 
sent through Laigean. 



480 CHRONICLES 

And Degad gathered together the host of Mumain, 
and he practised with the chiefs of Oldanmact: what 
though it was told unto him that they would abide 
within their own land, judging of them e'en by him- 
self, his hitherto success in the bye-ways of craft, 
did speak with flattering tongue, and tell him he 
might yet prevail ; he never knew, or now seemed to 
forget, the Danan never spoke one word with which 
their heart went not. 

Still full of the hope, proud of the day that Congal 
fell by Degad's wiles, the warriors of Mumain and of 
Laigean were gathered together on the plains of 
Sith, and round about. 

And knowing that Factna would seek them out, 
there they did raise their tents. 

Now when the host of Ullad were together in Ard 
Deas, so mighty were they, it being thought the pro- 
vision would not suffice, the young men of Clanna 
Ruidruide said, " Our stock will lack not whilst we 
stand on Ullad, then Laigean and Mumain shall 
yield supply." 

And the words were brought to the ear of the 
king, and he hasted to the tents of Clanna Ruidruide, 
and he entered into the midst of the circle, and he 
reproved them sharply, saying, 

" Shall we follow the example of Mumain and of 
Laigean ? Shall the warriors of Ullad become cattle- 
drivers, ravishers of the spoil? Let no such words be 
heard now, to be told in times to come." 

Moreover Factna added, 

" Let words pass from mouth to ear, that the old 
men and boys do follow the host with all the cattle 
of the king, and of the sons of Er, wherever had. , 



OF ERI. 481 

And as the warriors of Ullad moved through Lai- 
gean, the land was desolate, all were on Magsith. 

And what time they reached within view of the 
plain, the warriors of Mumain and of Laigean ap- 
peared in their thousands, their tents on the bearers 
moving towards Ardbreisgte, and on the side of the 
hill did they raise them up, till ere long the hill was 
covered. 

And the men of Ullad camped on the plain. 

And on the morrow when Baal came forth, all the 
warriors were in motion, and the men of Mumain 
descended into the vale. 

And Factna bad the heralds say aloud, 

" The king of Ullad standeth on the land of Mum- 
ain to hear the answer of Ardri, why he protecteth 
Degad an outlaw ? 

" And why he hath kept the doors of the high 
chamber of Teacmor closed ?" 

And Duac bad the heralds answer, 

" Ardri will soon make the lawgivers of Ullad skip 
from off the soil of Mumain" 

And Factna called on the name of Duac to 
spare the Gaol; but Duac followed not the steps of 
the herald, the first time that one of the race of Iber 
shrunk from the combai. 

And the battle began midway of morning, and 
abated not till Baal was about to take his de- 
parture. 

Ullad drave Mumain and Laigean before them ; 
the Clanna Ruidruide sought Duac among the host, 
cutting a passage through and through, overbearing 
all that stood in their course. 

And Duac was slain. 

VOL. II. 2 I 



482 CHRONICLES 

Degad they found not, he escaped with men of 
Laigean, leaving those of Mumain to bear the weight 
of the battle. 

The earth did groan, oppressed with the weight of 
the warriors that lay in death. 

Eri wept blood. 

So many ceased not at one time since the Gaal of 
Sciot touched Eri, as the day when Duac fell in the 
battle of Ardbreisgte, 

Having ruled seven rings ; and he is called Duac 
Dealta Degaid (a) 

(a) Duac, the fosterer of Degad. ? 



CHAP. XXX. 

The reign q/Tactria the son of Cas, the son of Ruid 
ruide Mor king in Ullad, Ardri, a space of one 
score and three rings, from 30 to the year 7 be- 
fore Christ. 

GREAT was the slaughter of Ardbreisgte ; with Duac 
fell many of the princes of Iber and nobles of Mum- 
am, and of Laigean ; howbeit the princes of Laigean, 
did not tarry to feel the weight of the battle, they es- 
caped, and with them Degad, as Suin his father had 
done, when he did leave Cairbre the father of Duac 
lifeless on the ground. 

And Factna bad that the bodies of Duac, and of 
the princes and nobles of Mumain should be sought; 
and the men of Ullad did raise their heaps on the plain. 

And the death-song was chaunted, and the war- 
song was raised for the princes and nobles, but not 



OF ERI. 488 

for Duac, he did not answer to the voice of the her- 
ald, calling on his name. 

And the host of Ullad moved towards Teacmor, 
and Factna raised his tents on Tobrad; what though 
his desire was not towards the throne, it was thought 
better by those on whom he did call for counsel, 
that he should sit thereon, if but to stop the foot of 
Laigean. 

And Lugad the brother of Duac was chosen 
king in Mumain. 

And Factna did send forth the messengers to call 
together the kings, princes, and nobles to choose 
Ardri. 

And Factna king in Utlad was chosen. The 
minds of the prince of Ib Lugad, and many of the 
nobles of Mumain were turned away from Degad, 
nearly all the princes of Mumain able to bear the 
sword were slain. The princes arid men of Mumain 
knewqot fear, till Duac; and what did it avail him, 
yea, did he not fall thereby? 

And Factna having ruled one ring Ardri, sent out 
the messengers to call the assembly of Eri to Tobrad. 

And the king did see Scandt the chief of Oldan- 
mact, and he did wipe away the jealousy which lay 
on his mind of the sons of Er. He did move evenly, 
keeping in friendship with all, and the nobles were 
pleased at meeting each other in peace. 

And Factna went to Mur Olamain,and he did de- 
plore the state thereof, even the short time since he 
did abide on Teacmor, for Congal, Ardri; and he 
did encourage the Olam, and he did speak tenderly 
to the few of the youth that were within the school 



484 CHRONICLES 

And the king moved for Aodmagnmaca, leaving 
Feargus the son ofSeid in Teacmor. 

And he did call together the assembly of Ullad, 
and the chief, and the nobles of Oldanmact were in 
the chamber. 

And as they sat at the boards, and the horns went 
round, Factna said to Scandt, Rosruad the son of 
Ros and Alita, hath words for the ear of Scandt and 
his race. 

And Rosruad rose, and presented his hand to 
Scandt, and said aloud, " Whilst a son of the Danan 
shall breathe, the mind of Ros shall never entertain 
a thought of ruling Oldanmact; and the like sen- 
timent he will instil into the minds of his race as 
long as he shall live." 

And they did exchange hands of friendship. 

And the king said, " Now is the peace of Eri 
fixed." 

And when the chief and nobles of the Danaq were 
preparing to return to their own land, the king did 
give many presents to them. 

Factna ruleth in wisdom and justice, he doth love 
peace, yet doth he keep the minds of the youth ready 
for the battle. 

And when he had ruled for the course of seven 
rings, Melis died, and Felimid the son of Mtrarda 
was chosen Ard Olam of Ullad. 

And when Factna had ruled for the course of six- 
teen years, Fionlaoc king in Laigean died, and Eocaid 
his son was chosen. 

Now Factna had ruled in peace during seventeen 
rings, and the Gaol were in content and happiness, 



i OF ERI. 485 

when words came to his ear that Eocaid the king of 
Laigean had been practising evil, and that he had 
sent of the priests through Oldanmact, to speak in 
whispers to the nobles of that land. 

Moreover that Degad did abide in Oldanmact not 
for good. 

And Factna sent letters unto Eocaid of what he 
had heard, but the words thereof have not been set 
down on the chronicles ofUllad; however peace en-, 
dured. 

Now Factna had ruled one score and three rings, 
Ardri, and he went to Dun Sobairce ; and he did 
move in the boat of the king on the waters of Foist, 
with an intent to pass over to the land of Ardtain. 

And the vessel had not gone far, when a great 
fire was espied beyond Dun Sobairce ; and the king 
feared for Mur Olamain, and he did return ; and as 
he was preparing to quit the boat, his foot slipped, 
and he fell into the water, and he was wetted all 
over him. 

The fire blazed from some tents of the Gaal, and 
the king mounted on a horse, and all followed as 
could to the place. 

It was some time ere he did return to Dun So- 
bairce: he was heated by exercise and by the fire, and 
on that night he was ill at ease, yet did he not yield 
till it was too late ; in twice nine days fee was no 
more. Thus perished Factna the son of Cas the son 
of Ruidruide Mor ; he was not surpassed by one of 
the race of Er. 

Brave and gentle, mild yet assured, he cherished 
peace, but feared not the battle, therefore is he 



486 CHRONICLES OF BRI. 

called Fatac in the roll of Ullads kings, in Ullad 
and Teacmor. 

And his heap hath been raised nigh unto the 
heap of Eocaid Olam Fodla, and Cairbre his son, 
and all the children of the land did mourn for Fact- 
na many days. 

Note. Fatac means prudent. 



CHRONOLOGY. 



OF THE HEBREWS. 

CHRONOLOGY is the just keeping of time, essential 
to the perfect understanding of history ; yet may a 
date be correct, and the relation attached thereto 
false. The most correct measurement of time doth 
not authenticate events, though it doth serve to de- 
tect errors so decidedly as to shake, and not unfre- 
quently to overthrow the credit of an historian alto- 
gether. 

Chronology hath been rendered imperfect in a 
great measure by vanity in divers people of the earth, 
in order to prove their high antiquity; but nothing 
hath tended to the confusion of this science in Europe 
so much as the attempt of the Christian priesthood 
to bend and twist times and seasons to the writings 
of the Hebrews ; the absurdity of which that I may 
demonstrate, I beg leave to lay before you a few pre- 
fatory observations, which peradventure may have 
the effect of weaning your inind from any predilec- 
tion it might have conceived for the accuracy of that 
people. 



488 CHRONOLOGY. 

And first let me notice, that in the Septuagint 
translation, and the Bible as we now have it, 
there is a difference between the Hebrews' cre- 
ation and the time of Noah, of years, nearly - 600 

Between the time of JNoah and of Abram - 900 

Between the Greek and Roman churches, 
from the creation to the Christians' era, the for- 
mer making the number of years 5508, the lat- 
ter 4004, there is found a difference of - - 1504 

And that between Josephus and the sacred 
writings, such as have escaped to our times, there 
exists a difference, from the creation to a flood, 
of, though Josephus expressly declares that the 
sacred writings themselves were his sole guides, 906 

B. c. 

Here it is worthy of observation, that all the 

accounts meet at the remarkable event of the 
overthrow of the ancient Scythian empire, re- 
corded by the Hebrews under the figure of a 
flood of waters, which, says Josephus, happened 
after a creation - 2656 

Which, saith the Bible, occurred after a crea- 
tion, years - - 1656 

The present Bible informs us that Abram 
emigrated from Haran after the flood 427 years 1921 

From the Bible in the days of Josephus, he 
informs us, that Abram emigrated from Haran 
years after the flood 367 - - 1981 

From the present Bible we are told that Jo- 
seph died in - 1635 

And from the same authority we learn, that 
the generation after Joseph passed away, com- 
puted at 33 years - - - 1602 



CHRONOLOGY. 489 

B. C. 

And we are instructed to believe, from the 
13th verse of the 15th chapter of Genesis, 

"That the Lord said unto Abram, know of a 
surety that thy seed shall be a stranger in a land 
that is not theirs, and shall serve them, and they 
shall afflict them four hundred years" 

And this is confirmed to the letter by Jose- 
phus, in the 1st section of the 9th chapter of his 
2d book of the Antiquities of the Hebrews, 
wherein he says, speaking of the afflictions of his 
nation within JEgypt, 

" For four hundred years did they spend 
under these afflictions." 

No part of which 400 years is, either by the 
Bible or Josephus, included in the time of the 
sojourn of Abram, Isaac, or Jacob in the land 
of Canaan, nor of the days of Joseph, nor of the 
next generation in Egypt : the afflictions of the 
children of Israel not having commenced till the 
generation after Joseph had passed away ; there- 
fore the exodus from Egypt by these accounts 
would be 1202 

Moses being then 80 years old, and having 
lived to 120, he would have died in - - 1162 

Whilst the era of his death, according to Bible 
chronologers is, before Christ, 1451. 

And, according to Josephus, he lived 1910 
years before Christ, that is, but 1 1 years after 
the present Bible saith, Abraham came into the 
land of Canaan, and 71 years according to Jose 
phus, whereby Abraham and Moses were con- 
temporaries. 



4PO CHRONOLOGY. 

B. C. 

.Now you will please to remark, Josephus hath 
expressly affirmed frequently, that every word 
he wrote was taken from the sacred writings of 
his (the Hebrew) nation, therefore there can be 
no question, either that Josepbns hath uttered 
multitudes of falsehoods gratuitously, or that 
the Bible that hath been handed to us has been 
sadly mutilated, which as to the 400 years of 
servitude in Egypt, cannot be the case, as both 
it and Josephus are in accord in that particular; 
and when it is considered that .Josephus in the 
preface to his work, saith, " For he (Ptolemy 
king of Egypt) did not obtain all our writings 
at that time, but those who were sent to Alex- 
andria as interpreters, gave him only the books 
of the law, whtKst there were a vast number of 
other matters in our sacred books, tttey indeed 
contain in them the history of five thousand 
years;'' thus making the creation nearly 1000 
years older than the Bible doth, as before men- 
tioned. 

When these things are considered, and when 
to them is added the fact of these sacred writ- 
ings having passed through the fiery ordeal of 
the pandemonium of Rome ; the demigods of 
which frequently decreed what should, and 
should not be considered part of the sacred 
writings; the actual word of God; for my 
own part 1 am not at all surprised at the 
blessed confusion that riots through not only 
the chronology, but various other branches of 
science, contained in that amazing work. Yet 



CHRO.NOLOG1. 491 

B. C. 

those who protest against divers absurdities of 
the Roman doctrine, still cling to the havoc the 
conclave hath made in divers other absurdities. 
Here it may be asked, have 1 any method of 
rectifying what I condemn ? If I presume to . 
pull down, can I raise up any thing better? 
To which I reply, yes. Whether what I offer 
be or be not preferable you will judge; of this I 
am certain, no one can frame or fancy any thing 
worse than what I have laid before you as stand- 
ing in the sacred writings. With your leave then 
let us remove the hollow reed of miracle, set up 
the standard of reason, and apply the unerring 
mete yard of nature to the chronology of these 
Hebrew people Nature, whose laws are laws of 
equality, and were not transgressed in favour of 
the children of Israel, to whom events have ever 
occurred as to other men. 

For the sake of clearness, and for the sake of 
common sense, I will not meddle with the word 
creation as a point of commencement : how can 
it be done with propriety, when we hear of the 
Egyptians affirming that they kept note of time 
scores of thousands of years before the Hebrew 
creation ? 

That the Chinese have preserved record of 
time hundreds of thousands of years. 

And that the Assyrian Chaldeans had ob- 
served the stars 473,000 years. 

Therefore I shall count upwards from the 
Christians' era, and as I have as good authority 
as the Bible for saying, that the Hebrew flood 



492 CHRONOLOGY. 

B. c. 

preceded the commencement of the building of 
Babel but one year, instead of one hundred and 
one years, which if I mistake not, will appear 
from the Hebrew chronology itself, J shall date 
the flood, that is, the Assyrian invasions of 
Mesopotamia, at the year before Christ - 2247 

From the invasion of the Assyrians to the 
birth of Abram, being nine generations, at 100 
years to three generations - 1947 

From the birth of Abram till the generation 
after Joseph had passed off, 166 years - 1781 

The exodus of the Israelites, after 400 years 
of affliction in Egypt - - 1381 

The tribe of Garchad invade Egypt - 1374 

The time of the fifteen judges of Israel, from 
Moses to Samuel, both inclusive, therefore to be 
counted but as fourteen, part of the time of Moses 
being included in Egypt, and part of Samuel in 
the time of Saul, made king, at nearly 21 years 
to a generation, in - 1095 

From which you perceive, all the times from 
the founding of Babel, till the termination of the 
next generation after Joseph in Egypt, are cal- 
culated by the technical scheme of the Greeks, 
which computed three generations to one hun- 
dred years; a most suspicious circumstance, 
that the chronology of the Hebrews was woven 
on that frame, when it is recollected that the 
Septuagint was the work of Greeks ; and what 
is not a little extraordinary, the Bible chrono- 
logers have observed that rule in the ten gene- 
rations from Babel to the emigration of Abram ; 



CHRONOLOGY. 49^. 

B. C. 

though they have given 307 years to the three 
generations of Abram, Isaac, and Jacob, where- 
by, as you have seen, the exodus must have 
taken place in 1202, which [ date in 1381, from 
which time to the end of the Judges, I make 
28f> years, which allows between 20 and 21 
years to each ; which, considering their age, and 
the actual duration of all kings and rulers of 
every denomination in all countries of the earth, 
the time of whose government is ascertained, is 
rather over than under the length of time that 
should be ascribed to these men. But if you 
should be inclined to follow Bible chronology, 
that makes this space amount to 350 years, al- 
lowing 28 years to each, which is more than ever 
rulers lived, though 33 years is not too much, by 
heads of families, I have only to request of you 
to read the 30th verse of the 3d chapter of 
Judges: 

" And Moab was subdued that day under 
the hand of Israel, and the land had rest fourscore 
years" 

And then read the 1st, 2d, and 3d verses of 
the 4th chapter of Judges: 

" And the children of Israel again did evil in 
the sight of the Lord, when Ehud was dead ; 

" And the Lord sold them into the hand of 
Jobin king of Canaan, that reigned in Hazor, 
the captain of whose host was Sisera, which 
dwelt in Harosheth of the Gentiles. 

"And the children of Israel cried unto the 
Lord, for he had 900 chariots of iron, and 



494 CHRONOLOGY. 

B. C. 

twenty years he mightily oppressed the children 
of Israel" 

Though immediately before it is said, they 
had rest for fourscore years. 

After this sample, and I could cite scores as 
nonsensical, methinks it would be more decent 
to surrender the infallibility of the chronology 
at least, of the children of Israel. 

Newton dates the commencement of Saul's 
reign at 1069, and allows him to live but ten 
years afterwards. I cannot conceive on what 
data he founded his judgment : I prefer the 
Bible; whereby he begins to rule in 1095, and 
dies in 1056, having reigned 39 years, ground- 
ing my opinion upon the words in the 2d verse 
of the 9th chapter of 1 Samuel. 

" And he (Kish) had a son whose name was 
Saul, a choice young man." 

Upon the fact of his being occupied in look- 
ing after stray asses, and his saying to a servant 
sent with him, 

" Come, let us return, lest my father leave 
caring for the asses, and take thought for us." 

All which things denote youth. 

On the events of his rule, which demand the 
space of time the Bible hath allotted to his 

reign ; 

And on his son Jonathan having grown up a 
man of prowess, leading armies during the life- 
time of Saul. 

To Saul succeeded David, in - 1056 

To him succeeded Solomon, and marries the 
daughter of Amrnon, king of Egypt. Josephus 



CHRONOLOGY. 49S 

B. c. 

says, Solomon lived 94 years, and reigned 80 
years : I have followed the Bible, - 10J6 

He is succeeded by his son Rehoboam by the 
daughter of Ammon, in the kingdom of Judaea; 

And in the kingdom of Israel, or Samaria, by 
Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, in - 975 

From this time the land of the twelve tribes 
of the children of Israel were divided into two 
separate kingdoms, and so continued. 

Sesostris, king of Egypt, sacks the temple of 
Jerusalem - 971 

Isaiah began to prophesy in - 760 

And mentions Cyrus by name, who was not 
born till 600, "Credat Juda3us Apelles ; non 
ego." 

Shalmon Assur conquers Samaria or Israel, 
takes away the people, and distributes them in 
cities through Media - 721 

Nebochadon Assur, the king of the Assyrians 
invades Judrea, carries away all the treasures of 
church and state, and the king and all the 
princes, and all the smiths and craftsmen, cap- 
tives to Babylon ; setting over the poor people 
that he suffered to remain in Judaa, Zedekiah, in 
the room of Jehoiachin - - 599 

This cannot be the captivity of 70 years that 
was to end with Cyrus. 

Ezekiel had hisy?rs vision in 595 

Zedekiah having rebelled against Assyria, 
Nebochadon Assur takes away all he could find 
into captivity to Babylon - - 588 



496 CHRONOLOGY. 

B. C. 

This cannot be the captivity of 70 years, that 
was to end in Cyrus, and I know of no other. 

The return of the children of Israel from cap- 
tivity - - 536 

The remainder of the history of the Hebrews 
doth not avail. 



OF THE SCYTHIANS. 

THE Magsagiotig commenced their chronology 
before Christ - - 5359 

When one thousand and eleven years were 
completed, a colony of them moved southward, 
invaded the land of the Arabs, and dwelled be- 
tween the Indus and the Tigris, which river they 
passed in - 4055 

They war with the Egyptians and Vexores, 
in the days of Tanaus - 3746 

They hold the government of Western Asia, 
till invaded by the Assyrians in - 2246 

Noah, the supreme chief of the ancient Scy- 
thian empire, flies to Ardmenia, which he rules, 
and dies in 2215 

Is succeeded by lapheth, who dies in - 2173 

Who was succeeded by his youngest son Og, 
when a tribe called Ogeageis, led by laban, 
(lavan) emigrated to Thrace by the way of the 
Bosphorus - - - - 2172 



CHRONOLOGY. 497 

Of the Scythian tribes of Greece. 

B. C. 

The Ogeageis ad vanned south ward, and poured 
into the country afterwards Boeotia, called the 
flood of Ogyges - 1180 

A multitude of the tribe of Garchad (Gerga- 
shites) who had emigrated from Canaan to 
Egypt, on the invasion of Joshua, fly from Egypt 
to the southern extremity of Greece, where they 
commenced to build the towns of Cecropeia in 
Attica, and Lycosura, Phoronicum, and JEgia- 
leum, in Peloponnesos, the first towns in Greece; 
the tribe having assumed the name of Pelasgoi 1120 

Hemon, a Pelasgian, moved from Pelopon- 
nesos northward with a colony, who seat them- 
selves in Thessaly - 1060 

Cadmus emigrates from Phoenicia to the coun- 
try afterwards Bceotia, and introduces the six- 
teen Phoenician letters, called by the Greeks the 
Phoenician or Cadmean letters - 1045 

The tribe of Ogeageis that advanced to Boeo- 
tia, who assumed the specific name of Ellenes, 
invaded the part of Thessaly occupied by the 
Pelasgoi, called the flood of Deucalion, Ellen 
being called a son of Deucalion - - 1043 

Oenotrus, a Pelasgian, led a colony from 
Greece to Italy: he is the Janus of the Romans, 
and these were the first Scythians who emi- 
grated to Italy - - 1028 

The council Amfictain established at Ther- 
mopylae - 100 

Saturn leads a colony from Crete to Italy 1015 

VOL. n. 2 K 



498 CHRONOLOGY. 

B. C. 

Sesostris king of Egypt invades Thrace, kills 
Lycurgus, and sets Oegrus, father of Orpheus, 
over that nation - - 967 

Sesostris invades Greece - 96*6 

Differences composed in the council Amfic- 
tain between Sesostris and the Greeks - 965 

Armais, or Danaus, flies to Greece from his 
brother Sesostris, and introduces the twelve gods 
of Egypt, the Dii magni major um gentium 964 

Evander leads a colony from Greece to Italy 943 
Sesostris king of Egypt being dead now six- 
een years, and that country being convulsed, 
the council Amn'ctain determined on sending 
an embassy to all the Scythian nations on the 
Euxine and Mediterranean that he had reduced, 
and commence building the ship Argo - 937 

Chiron delineated the asterisms for the use of 
the Argonauts - 936 

The equipment completed, the Argonauts set 
out on their expedition - 935 

The Heraclides driven out of Peloponnesus 907 
Troy taken - - 886 

JEneas leads a colony to Italy 883 

Hesiod and Homer live - 840 

The, Heraclides, after three generations, return 
to Peloponnesus - 807 

The Olympiads restored - 776 

Lycurgus frames a code of laws for Sparta 705 
Rome built about - 620 

The bloody Draco makes laws for Athens 572 
Solon makes laws for the Athenians - 5t>2 

Solon dies i - - - 549 



CHRONOLOGY. 



B. C. 

Kingly government abolished at Rome 508 

Battle of Cheronea, the extinction of the liber- 

ties of Greece - - - 338 

Alexander the Macedonian overthrows the 

Persian empire - 332 

Wars between Carthage and Rome began 263 
Ended - 148 

Marius destroys the Cimbri or Germanni 102 
Brutus and Cassius conspire against Julius 

Caesar, the tyrant, and puthira to death - 44 



OF THE ASSYRIANS* 

THE Assyrians, under the conduct of Bel, in- 
vade Western Asia, and establish themselves in 
Mesopotamia ' - - - 2247 

Commence building Babylon - 2246 

Recommence their astronomical observations 2233 
Nin succeeds Bel about . - 2220 

The Assyrians go up from Babylon, and com- 
mence building a city on the eastern bank of 
Tigris, which Nin calls from himself Nineveh 2210 

The great Assyrian empire, under one su- 
preme chief, ended in Assurhadon Bel, com- 
monly called Sardanapalus - - 747 

On this event Arbaces becomes king in Nine- 
veh, and Belesis king in Babylon. 

Arbaces dies, and is succeeded by his son , 
Shalmon Assur, - 7*28 

Who is succeeded by his son Sennacherib - 714 
2K 2 



CHRONOLOGT. 

The Medes revolt from the Assyrians 71 1 

Dejoces chosen king of the Medes, builds Ec- 
batana - - 709 

Sennacherib dies, and is succeeded by his 
son Assurhadon - 706 

On the death of Messimordacus, Assurhadon 
king of Nineveh unites the kingdoms of Nine- 
veh and Babylon in his own person - 680 

He is succeeded by his son Saosduchinus - 667 

Dejoces dies, and is succeeded by his son 
Phraortes - 656 

Saosduchinus dies, and is succeeded by 
Chyniladanus - - 647 

Phraortes dies, and is succeeded by his son 
Cyaxares - - 636 

The Scythian Goths, led by Og-eiscean, in- 
vade Media - - 635 

Nebobelassur revolts from Chyniladanus, and 
becomes king of Babylon - 625 

Cyaxares king of the Medes, and Nebocha- 
donassur, son of Nebobelassur king of Babylon, 
utterly destroy the famous city of Nineveh 609 

Nebochadonassur succeeds his father in Ba- 
bylon - - 606 

Astyages succeeds his father Cyaxares - 594 

Evilmerodoch, king of Babylon - 561 

Nirgalassur succeeds him - 59 

Astyages dies, and is succeeded by his son, 
Cyaxares II. - - 559 

Belassur, commonly called Belshassur, rules 
in Babylon - 555 

Cyrus, the Persian Scythian, having gained 



CHRONOLOGY.. 501 

B. c. 

over Daniel, the Hebrew Scythian, minister of 
Belshassur, enters Babylon by night, whilst a 
great feasc was celebrating in the palace, and 
Daniel Knowing what had actually taken place, 
that Cyrus and the Scythians were already with- 
in the walls of the city, prophesied that the king- 
dom of the Assyrians would pass to the Medes 
and Persians; of both which nations the in- 
Taders were composed - - 538 

Cyrus subdues Lis uncle, Cyaxares, and thus 
ended the empire of the Assyrians, having con- 
tinued in one shape or another, at Babylon, Ni- 
neveh, or Ecbatana, for the space of 1711 
years. . . ^ . . 53(5 



OF THE PERSIANS. 

THE ancient name of this part of the vast Scy- 
thian empire was Elam, which preserved its in- 
dependence against the Assyrians, yet is little 
mention made of it till the birth of Cyrus 590 

Cyrus takes Sardis - 544 

He takes Babylon - 538 

He overcomes Cyaxares his maternal uncle, 
and translates the empire of the Assyrians, both 
Medes and Babylonians, to the Persians - 536 

Cyrus dies, is succeeded by his son Cam- 
byses 529 

Who is succeeded by Darius Hystaspes - 52 J 
Who dies, and is succeeded by Xerxes, in 485 



CHRONOLOGY. 

B. c. 

Xerxes invades Greece - - 480 

Darius Nothus reigns - - 424 

Artaxerxes Mnemon reigns - 405 

Ochus reigns - 35U 

Darius Codomanus reigns - - 336 
The ancient Persian empire overthrown by 

Alexander, the Macedonian Scythian * 332 



OF THE SCYTHIAN GOTHS. 

THIS tribe emigrated from Maghog in Ard- 
menia, and crossed Caucasus - 1950 

From whence they passed the Tanais into 
Europe, and advanced south to the Isser, west 
lo the Tobiscus, and northward, how far is not 
ascertained : nor did they preserve any register 
of time; if they did I know nothing of it, save 
that Og-eiscean invaded Media in about - 035 

Which they held till - - - 612 



OF THE EGYPTIANS. 

MispHRAGMUTHOsiskingof Egypt expels many 
of the Scythian shepherds (who had fled from 
Joshua), who now steered for Greece, and there 
called Pelasgoi, in - 1 120 

Ammon is king of Egypt - 1034 

Sesostris. the son of Ammon, invades Arabia 10 10 



CHRONOLOGY. 503 

% 

B. C. 

He invades Spain, introduces idolatry, and 
sets up pillars at both sides of the entrance into 
the Mediterranean, to perpetuate the memory of 
his conquests - - 1008 

Ammon dies, and is succeeded by his son 
Sesostris - 1002 

Who places Jeroboam the son of Nebat on a 
throne in Samaria - 979 

He invades Judea - 974 

He is slain by his brother Neptune, or la- 
petus - 956 

Is succeeded by his son Orus, who was drown- 
ned in the Nile on the invasion of Egypt by the 
Ethiopians, in 947 

(Here ends the dynasty of the gods.) 

Menes, or Amenophis the Ethiopian, rules in 
Upper Egypt 946 

The government of Egypt committed to twelve 
princes - 67 1 

Psamiticus becomes king of all Egypt - - 655 
Egypt reduced by Cambyses the Persian 527 
Egypt falls under the government of Ptolemy 
Lagus the Macedonian - - 323 

Falls under the dominion of Rome, about 48 

It now remains that I give my reasons for assign- 
ing the dates 1 have assigned to the four grand epochs, 
viz. 

THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE COUNCIL AMPHICTYON, 

Which by chronologers is placed in - 1485 



504 CHRONOLOGY. 

a. c< 

THE AGE OF SESOSTR1S, 

Which by chronologers is set down at - 1484 

THE EXPEDITION OF THE ARGONAUTS, 

Which by chronologers is stated at - 1267 

AND THE FALL OF TROY, 

Which by chronologers is said to be in 1 184 

By looking back to my chronology of Greece, 
you will see the date assigned to the arrival of 
the Pelasgoi in that country to be 1120 B. c., 
and the establishment of a colony from Pelo- 
ponnesus of these Pelasgians, led by Haemon, 
in Upper Thessaly, 1060. Upon which event 
history records, that Ellen, called a son of 
Deucalion, invaded the lands on which Haemon 
had seated himself. For the purpose of adjust- 
ing the differences between these tribes, the 
council Amphictyon, composed of deputies of 
Pelasgoi, Ellenes, and Cadmeans, but not Pe- 
lasgoi of Attica (who took no part in these con- 
tentions)," was instituted ; and it not being pos- 
sible to assign a more early date to the institu- 
tion than to the events that gave birth to it, 
which events could not well have occupied a 
less space] than 100 years, I have placed the 
date of the institution at - 102C 

As to the age of Sesostris, chronologers merely 
conjecture; and when I consider the many 
proofs that can be adduced for ascertaining his 
era, I am astonished that there are two opinions 
concerning it. 

Saturn did not lead the colony from Crete 



CHRONOLOGY* 505 

B. C, 

to Italy till about 1015; and history testifies, 
that when Sesostris marched from Spain, after 
the reduction of that country, he found Saturn 
in Italy in 1008; and the chronicles of Gaelag, 
wherein he is called Sru, positively assert, that 
he then over-ran Spain, where he introduced 
idolatry, and erected columns to perpetuate the 
memory of his victories. 

Besides, see the proofs of his identity with Se- 
sac, or Shishak, the son of Ammon, king of Egypt, 
whose daughter Solomon married : "And it 
came to pass in the fifth year of king Reho- 
boam, Shishak king of Egypt came up against 
Jerusalem. And the people were without nun> 
ber that came with him out of Egypt, the Lu- 
bims, the Sukkiims, and the Ethiopians." And 
no king before Shishak ruled over these nations. 
And Josephus says, that " Herodotus, in de- 
scribing the expedition of Sesostris, related the 
expedition of Shishak, and attributed his actions 
to Sesostris, erring only in the name of the 
king," as is to be found in the tenth chapter of 
the eighth book of his Antiquities. Moreover, 
it was by his brother Danaiis, that the gods of 
Egypt were introduced into Greece. And to 
the whole let it be added, that the mother of 
Rehoboam, who was the daughter of Ammon, 
who was the father of Sesostris, or Sesac, is 
called, by the translators of the Bible, Naamah 
the Ammonites* ; which should be rendered, the 
daughter of Ammon, Naamah, in the Phoeni- 
cian language, meaning a female ; for, be it re- 



506 CHRONOLOGY. 

B C 

membered, that it was in the old age of Solo- 
mon that he took to him women of the nation 
of the Ammonites and of the Moabites, of none 
of whom could Rehoboam, by any possibility, 
be born, being above forty years old when his 
father died ; which synchronises with the date of 
the marriage of Solomon with the daughter of 
Ammon, Pharaoh of Egypt. And to conclude i 
this part of our subject, Orus the son of Sesostris, 
who succeeded him, and reigned but nine years, 
concluded the dynasty of the gods: after whom 
came Meues, who, by the concurrent testimony 
of antiquity, was that king of Egypt who reign- 
ed immediately after the gods. For all which 
reasons, and raaay more, I date the death of 
Sesostris in - 956 

As to the Expedition of the Argonauts, it 
was undertaken in consequence of the distrac- 
tion which prevailed in Egypt, Ethiopia, and 
Lybia, after the death of Orus. The ship in 
which the Argonauts sailed was constructed 
after the pattern of that in which Danaiis the 
brother of Sesostris, made his escape to Greece. 
To which 1 shall add, that when the Argonau- 
tic expedition was in preparation, Musaeus, the 
master of Orpheus, an Argonaut, formed a 
sphere, and Chiron described the asterisms for 
the purpose of the Argonauts; and that this 
sphere and these asterisms were then done, is 
evident from the fact, that the expedition itself, i 
and many antecedent events, were therein de- 
scribed, and nothing posterior. 



CHRONOLOGY; 507 

B. C. 

\\hen this sphere was formed, the solstice 
\vas in the fifteenth degree, or the middle of the 
constellation of Cancer ; and Melon, in the 
316th year of the era Nabonassur, which was 
the 431st year before Christ, observed the sum- 
mer solstice in the eighth degree of Cancer ; of 
course it had gone back seven degrees, and as 
it goes back one degree in 72 years, and seven 
degrees in 504 years ; these 504, added to 431, 
make 935, consequently the true era of the Ar 
gonautic expedition will be - 935 

As to the fall of Troy, the proofs are full and 
abundant, that in placing that event in 1184, it 
has been antedated full 300 years. 

If I have assigned a just date to the expedition 
of the Argonauts, a later date must be assigned to 
the war between the states of Greece and Priam of 
Troy ; and to shew that the era I have given to tha 
event, viz. 886, is correct, I appeal to the 53rd chap- 
ter of the Euterpe of Herodotus, written about 440 
before Christ, wherein he says, that " Homer and 
Hesiod lived about 400 years before that time:" and 
to Hesiod I appeal, who says that, "he lived in the 
age next after the war of Troy, and that his age 
would conclude when the men then on the earth 
grew grey, and descended into the grave;" from 
which it appears, that the true age of Homer and 
Hesiod was about 840, to which add the allowance 
for the generation immediately after the war of Troy, 
which commenced in 895, we find about 870; to 
which add what had passed of the generation in 
which Homer and Hesiod then existed, say 25 years 



508 CHRONOLOGY. 

from the commencement, and 15 years from the 
conclusion of that war, and the date above assigned 
will be correct; to which, if the authority of Thu- 
cydides be considered, when he says in his first 
book, " It is somewhat more than 400 years from 
the conclusion of this present" (the Peloponnesian) 
" war, that the Lacedemonians have enjoyed the 
same polity," that is, since the return of the Herac- 
lides and Dorians to Sparta, which return is stated 
by Thucydides, in his first book, to have taken place 
in 80 years after the Trojan war. Now the Pelo- 
ponnesian war ended in 404, therefore the return of 
the Heraclides would be in 804, to which, if eighty 
years be added between the Trojan war and the re- 
turn of the Heraclides to Peloponnesus, we find 
804; to which permit me to subjoin (for the vin- 
dication of the Mantuan poet, '.whose delicious writ- 
ings have afforded so much delight to all who are 
so fortunate as to be able to read them in his 
native tongue), that Virgil hath described ^Eneas 
with Dido y or Elissa, at Carthage, which was not 
founded till 883 : and as it is apparent, from no- 
tices of antiquity, that JEneas was a false traitor 
to his country, and, therefore, was permitted by the 
Grecians to abide in Troy for three years after the 
termination of the war, to equip twenty vessels, and 
bring away afcolony with him ; subtract these three 
years from 885, you have 882, the year after the ar- 
rival of Dido in Africa, and the commencement of 
the building of Carthage: on consideration of all 
which things I call on the present generation to re- 
consider the judgment of other times, and now to de- 
liver a verdict. Doth not every hour's experience 



CHRONOLOGY. 509 

teach, that judgment? delivered by jurors, are not al- 
ways verdicts ? 

And now, my companion, whoever you may 
happen to be, I have but to express my hope that 
you will derive instruction from my delightful la- 
bour, with which if you are pleased, my reward is 
full and ample. Should you find fault with, or 
reject my words, let it be done according to reason, 
not prejudice, and before you condemn, be sure you 
have sufficient grounds therefor. And now 1 take 
my leave for the present, wishing health and happi- 
ness to all the good people of the earth, and speedy 
amendment to the vicious ; and if my health will 
permit (I shall certainly carry the victory over my 
adverse circumstances), I hope early in the year that 
is to ensue, to present the world with a continuation 
of the history of my adored Eri. 



THE END. 



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